Summary of “Best Workouts for 40 Year Old Men”

Periodize your regimen The importance of periodizing and the risks of not doing so have been drilled into my head by the likes of soccer coach Raymond Verheijen and exercise scientist Trent Stellingwerff, Ph.D.For an elite athlete, periodizing can mean creating a structured program of buildup and tapering that yields peak fitness at a precise time.
Emphasize recovery Elite lifters end their workouts differently than the rest of us do.
A percentage of your workouts should be high intensity, and the balance – say, 80 percent – should be performed at very low intensity.
Elite older athletes stay competitive by being more deliberate in their training, focusing their limited time honing specific skills, and correcting their fitness weaknesses.
If you’re looking for a new challenge to get in the best shape of your life after 40, check out Muscle After 40, the latest 12-week workout program from Men’s Health.
I’ve increased the protein in my diet as well as the number of times I consume it during the day, following the advice of triathlete and nutrition scientist Asker Jeukendrup, Ph.D. A side benefit: Adding protein to anything you eat effectively lowers its glycemic index, says Chris Jordan, M.S., C.S.C.S., director of exercise physiology for the Johnson & Johnson Human Performance Institute.
Challenging your body in the same ways day after day for decades is an efficient way to chew up your body.
There’s nothing like trying something new and sucking at it, and then sucking a little less every day.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Leader’s Calendar”

On top of that, the CEO must be the internal and external face of the organization through good times and bad. CEOs, of course, have a great deal of help and resources at their disposal.
A CEO’s schedule is a manifestation of how the leader leads and sends powerful messages to the rest of the organization.
In the study each CEO’s executive assistant was trained to code the CEO’s time in 15-minute increments, 24 hours a day and seven days a week, and to regularly verify that coding with the CEO. The resulting data set reveals where, how, and with whom the CEO spent his or her time and on what activities, topics, and tasks.
On the basis of these discussions and those with the hundreds of other CEOs in our workshops, we are convinced that every leader can improve his or her time management.
Finally, we will reflect on what our rich data reveals about the overall role of the CEO. A CEO has to simultaneously manage multiple dimensions of influence, which all contain dualities, or seeming contradictions, that effective CEOs must integrate.
Keeping time allocation aligned with CEOs’ top priorities is so crucial that we suggest that every quarter CEOs make a point of looking back at whether their schedule for the previous period adequately matched up with their personal agenda.
Should the CEO follow up with that person right away to make sure everything is OK? Should the CEO just wait and let the team member cool off? Sometimes emerging problems seem small at first but balloon into larger distractions if the CEO doesn’t attend to them.
Though the CEO’s presence can be important, overseeing and managing such work does not require the CEO and can be delegated to direct reports, for whom it is motivational and provides professional development opportunities.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The court’s decision to let AT&T and Time Warner merge is ridiculously bad”

AT&T and Time Warner won a historic court victory this week, convincing Judge Richard Leon in the US District Court for the District of Columbia that they should be able to merge over the antitrust objections of the Department of Justice.
The decision surprised almost everyone – not necessarily that AT&T and Time Warner had won, but that Judge Leon allowed the merger to go through with no conditions or prohibitions on their behavior at all.
Watching vertically integrated, data-informed entities thrive as television subscriptions and advertising revenues declined, AT&T and Time Warner concluded that each had a problem that the other could solve: Time Warner could provide AT&T with the ability to experiment with and develop innovative video content and advertising offerings for AT&T’s many video and wireless customers, and AT&T could afford Time Warner access to customer relationships and valuable data about its programming.
An excellent summary of AT&T’s pitch to its investors! But did you spot the glaring foundational error? Judge Leon thinks Facebook and Google are vertically integrated, data-informed competitors to AT&T and Time Warner.
AT&T and Time Warner aren’t trying to catch up to Netflix by merging; they’re trying to step ahead of them in line by marrying Time Warner’s content to AT&T’s network.
With such strong industry tailwinds in favor of mobile video consumption, this strategy will increase viewership, making Time Warner content “Worth far more.” At the same time, AT&T will bring to bear its consumer relationships and data to begin to tailor Time Warner’s advertising and increase its value.
Let’s pick up again on page 150 with the second argument, that AT&T will block virtual MVPDs like Sling and YouTube TV from showing Time Warner channels like CNN. According to the Government, the challenged merger would give AT&T the “Ability to harm competition by slowing the growth of emerging, innovative online distributors” – that is, virtual MVPDs.
Nowhere does the Government explain why AT&T would deploy valuable Time Warner content to prop up a rival’s businessmodel, while harming its own.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Future of TV Is About Couch Shows vs. Phone Shows”

At first by circumstance, and now by design, this is how I organize my television diet: couch shows and phone shows.
It’s well known by now that Americans have changed the way they watch TV. People pull content from Hulu rather than have it pushed to us by CBS. DVRs allow for shifted viewing times and skipping ads.
Consumers are now, often unconsciously, sorting every media product-from podcasts to magazine stories to video-into three categories: intentional, interstitial, and invisible.
Intentional media are the handful of offerings that we plan in advance to experience and then carve out particular chunks of time to enjoy.
For me, these are the couch shows like Better Call Saul and very little else.
For me, these are the articles saved on Instapaper, audiobooks, and phone shows like Billions, which I enjoy immensely but have never seen inside my own home and have rarely watched in segments longer than a half hour.
Examining the media ecosystem through these three lenses-which focus less on the technologies of distribution and more on the patterns of consumption-yields new clues about both the economics of media and the design principles of its creation.
Fifteen years ago, when I had no choice but to repair to a particular room to watch television, the imperative for anyone in the TV industry was to secure my attention once I got there.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Best Meditation Apps: Reviews by Wirecutter”

We didn’t think the beginner meditations on Calm were quite as good as those on Headspace.
Some users also complain in Calm’s App Store reviews that Tamara talks too much in the guided meditations.
Calm’s shortest meditations start at 10 minutes long, whereas Headspace has lots of short one- to five-minute options.
Calm offers some things that Headspace doesn’t have.
While the Headspace timers increase in only five- or 10 minute increments, you can increase Calm’s timer in one-minute increments.
While Headspace carries you through its app on its strong narrative thread and clear course sequencing, Calm’s offerings can feel disparate and overwhelming at times.
Like Headspace, Calm offers many of the same perks, such as options to download meditations for offline streaming.
Calm has 4.8 stars across 114,000 reviews in the App Store, putting it among the top-rated meditation apps.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Suiting Up with John Cena”

John Cena is “Grateful” for the earliest incarnations of his wrestling character-“John Cena,” hardscrabble white rapper from New England who wore a Home Depot dookie chain around his neck and thought he was from Compton; a relic from a different time, truly-and for Stephanie McMahon, who gave him his first WWE match after she heard him freestyling on a bus trip overseas with other WWE superstars, including Rikishi, Chuck Palumbo, Mark Jindrak, and Rey Mysterio.
Relatedly, John Cena now prefers his haircut high and tight, skin fade with a six guard up top.
John Cena is also very impressed by Childish Gambino’s “This Is America.” “Holy hell that was powerful,” says John Cena.
John Cena loves Victorian architecture, “The ornate presentation” and the “Overdoing of everything.” Perhaps coincidentally, his favorite wrestler of all time is Hulk Hogan.
No one seems as surprised by the sudden ubiquity of John Cena as John Cena.
There’s John Cena again, currently in the process of playing not one but two animated robots-Bumblebee, in a forthcoming Transformers origin story adaption; and a robot named Robo in Dallas & Robo, a zany if Adult Swimmish cartoon co-starring Kat Dennings that premiered on YouTube Red in late May. Fans will note that playing a robot is a funny choice, since the big knock on John Cena, especially in the early phases of his long career, was his weirdly robotic yes-man rigidity.
There’s John Ce-wait, actually, no you can’t see John Cena this time but his presence is notable in a widely aired car commercial for a 2018 Toyota Camry that merely features John Cena’s WWE entrance theme, produced by his cousin marc “Tha Trademarc” Predka and written and performed by John Cena.
Speaking of animation, John Cena was part of a team that received an Oscar nomination for Ferdinand, co-starring Kate McKinnon, where John Cena plays the voice of a colossal Spanish bull whose defining characteristic is his pacifism and who-not to spoil anything-manages to upend the bullfighting industrial complex and quell the bloodlust of la plaza de toros by refusing convention and doing things his way.

The orginal article.

Summary of “You should be sleeping more than eight hours a night. Here’s why”

Why 8.5 hours of sleep is the new eight hours.
A professor I collaborate with at Penn State named Orfeu Buxton says that 8.5 hours of sleep is the new eight hours.
In order to get a healthy eight hours of sleep, which is the amount that many people need, you need to be in bed for 8.5 hours.
The standard in the literature is that healthy sleepers spend more than 90% of the time in bed asleep, so if you’re in bed for eight hours, a healthy sleeper might actually sleep for only about 7.2 hours.
8.5 hours of sleep is the new eight hours.
For optimum productivity, we need around eight hours of sleep, right? But that doesn’t have to be in one go.
Gallup has reported that over the past 50 years, we’re sleeping a whole hour less per night than we did in the 1950s.
There is certainly a false myth that we need eight hours of continuous sleep: I think it’s possible to have your sleep be a little bit broken up and be perfectly healthy-but getting that eight hours is crucially important.

The orginal article.

Summary of “On The Radio, It’s Always Midnight”

“Ultimately, we don’t belong in the world governed by time,” says Michael Cremo, a guest on KNWZ, a radio station in Palm Springs, California.
Cremo is talking about the end-time, which he thinks could well be imminent, but his point is relevant to the experience of listening to local radio from somewhere I am not.
If I am feeling afternoony in the morning, I can leave the world that is “Governed by time” and join whichever community of radio listeners-in Mumbai, Perth, or Hong Kong-is currently experiencing three P.M. The optimism of a morning show somewhere to my west offers a fresh beginning to a day that’s become lousy by midafternoon, whereas the broadcasts of early evening, burbling across the towns and cities to my east, can turn my morning shower into a kind of short-haul time machine past those hours in which I’m expected to be productive.
“When you listen to radio, you are a witness of the everlasting war between idea and appearance, between time and eternity, between the human and the divine,” Herman Hesse writes.
Elsewhere, rather than accommodate through-the-night presenters, many stations switch on a preselected playlist-but even so, I like the hand-picked playlists on KCRW Berlin or Three D Radio in Adelaide far more than any sequence of music selected by algorithm.
They can be beautifully produced, as good as a good book, and perhaps they will supersede radio.
When I listen to radio from other time zones, I am reminded that I do not move through times of day but rather they move through me.
Somewhere in the world, it is always far too late to be up listening to the radio.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Dollar Shave Club Founder: Why Life Is Defined By Choices”

The theme of Dubin’s speech was centered on choices.
“I believe if you want to live a life of purpose and happiness, you have to become familiar with the essence of choices. Choices come in all shapes and sizes. And not all the important choices present themselves obviously as the important ones,” Dubin says.
Dubin splits choices into two categories: big and little choices.
So much so that Dubin argues small choices may matter more than big choices and have a bigger impact on your life.
Dubin proceeds to outline six choices that he believes contributed to his success.
Dubin adds, “Its cousin: don’t worry about what everyone else is doing. Despite how great their choices may seem, or how much they all seem to have it figured out. They don’t.”
Perhaps the most important choice you make in business and in life is to expand your scope of interests to others.
It is about making the little choices every day to be grateful for the opportunities you’ve been given, to thank the people in your life who help you out, and on some level to leverage a career to hopefully create a net positive effect in the world.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Apple iOS 12 update: the 17 biggest new features coming to the iPhone”

We expected coming into WWDC that iOS 12 would focus less on major new features and more on improving performance and eliminating bugs, and that’s partially true based on what Apple showed onstage today.
Grouped notifications Apple is taking a huge, overdue step to fix its messy notifications situation: iOS 12 will support grouped notifications, so you’ll be able to interact with or dismiss multiple notifications from the same app at once.
It’s called USDZ, and Federighi likened it to “Something like AR Quick Look.” A number of companies including Adobe, Autodesk, and Sketchfab have already announced that they’ll be integrating and building apps around USDZ. Measure app iOS 12’s more powerful augmented reality is being put to use right away in a new Apple app called Measure.
Siri opens to more apps Apple claims Siri is the most popular digital assistant in the world, and to help bolster that lead, it’s allowing developers more integration with iOS 12.
CarPlay is getting Google Maps and Waze Apple announced that its in-car platform CarPlay will add support for two of the most popular turn-by-turn navigation apps – Google Maps and Waze – after the launch of iOS 12.
Apple News The Apple News app is getting minor improvements such as a new Browse tab.
Voice Memos is coming to the iPad and adding iCloud syncing Apple announced that the Voice Memos app has similarly been redesigned and will come to the iPad with the release of iOS 12.
iBooks becomes Apple Books Apple is rebranding its ebook app from iBooks to Apple Books.

The orginal article.