Summary of “Plan a Better Meeting with Design Thinking”

The idea is to put the “User” at the center of the experience – an approach that works with meeting design, too.
Start by putting your own expertise and agenda aside and thinking about the people who will be affected by your meeting.
We compare the design and execution of meetings to the driving navigation app Waze: what is the quickest, safest, most effective way to get to your destination? The first step, immersing yourself with people, was about understanding where you need to go.
Their responses will help you gain more empathy, frame new questions, get even more creative in your meeting design, and increase your potential for success at the actual gathering.
Immersing helps people feel heard, and it ensures that meeting leaders are connected to participants.
Framing pushes the meeting leaders to ensure that there are clear goals for each meeting.
Imagining leads to more creativity and experimentation in the meeting design.
Finally, prototyping-something as simple as getting feedback on your plan from a few people – makes people feel valued, more accountable in the meetings, and more invested in their success.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Read More Books”

When people ask me how I read so many books, they’re usually fishing for a speed reading technique that will allow their brains to swallow books whole.
Being amazed at how many books I read in a year would be like being amazed at how many leaky faucets a plumber fixed in a year.
With that said, in addition to the books I read specifically for the Art of Manliness last year, I also managed to read 2-3 books every month for pleasure.
So the #1 secret to reading more is to spend more time reading.
What’s more, studies suggest that reading comprehension increases when you read an analog book compared to reading on digital devices.
As mentioned above, when people ask me how I read so many books, they often assume I’m speed reading.
If you’ve read one personal development book you’ve read them all.
I know a lot about WWII history because I’ve read a lot of books about WWII. I know a lot about Theodore Roosevelt because I’ve read a lot of books about Theodore Roosevelt.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Happens When Athletes Do the Sportswriting?”

The Players’ Tribune originally gave athletes newsroom titles: David Ortiz, the jolly Red Sox slugger, was editor at large; Matt Harvey, the Mets hurler, was New York City bureau chief.
Perhaps The Players’ Tribune can be best understood as an effort by athletes to seize that most precious contemporary commodity – the narrative.
“These guys are the best in the world at what they do, and they can’t catch a break! They’re getting beaten up all day. Mark Zuckerberg doesn’t get beaten up like that.” His point was this: All that unnecessary negativity that ESPN’s TV shows churn out is ultimately a boon to the bottom line of The Players’ Tribune because that negativity is persuading athletes to share their proprietary, much-desired content with The Players’ Tribune.
Conboy had previously worked at Wired and Sports Illustrated and was brought in before The Players’ Tribune concept had been publicly revealed, while athletes were still being recruited as investors.
The Players’ Tribune has an annual tradition called the “Athlete board meeting.” It’s open to just about anyone in the biz; a big room full of obscure Olympians and megastars, retired and active, male and female alike.
You get the sense that he’s quite pleased to be at The Players’ Tribune and that he’s not all that worried about what happens next.
The first time I saw Jeter at The Players’ Tribune, he appeared, fists pounding on the door, at a corner office where I had been chatting with Jon Sakoda, an early-stage investor.
Projecting The Players’ Tribune model forward, we can imagine a world in which athletes simply don’t need to talk to reporters, in an echo of what feels like the unstoppable atomization of all news and information.

The orginal article.

Summary of “In an Era of ‘Smart’ Things, Sometimes Dumb Stuff Is Better”

While riding a bicycle, for example, you often have to let go of the handle bar and lift the watch toward your face to check the time.
Until the Apple Watch manages to constantly display the time without sapping the battery, a normal wristwatch is better for telling the time in all those scenarios.
A kitchen timer vs. Amazon EchoOne of the most common uses of Amazon’s Echo is to set a kitchen timer.
Just say “Alexa, set a timer for 80 minutes” while you’re busy chopping vegetables.
There are reasons a cheap kitchen timer can be superior.
So if you have to check your food for doneness and change the kitchen timer, an old-school timer – either the analog variety or the type with a digital time display and two or three physical buttons – can be easier.
You can also constantly see how much time is left on the timer, whereas with the Echo, you have to open a smartphone app to see the remaining time or ask Alexa to tell you how much time is left.
Over the long term, using a smart speaker as a timer gets tedious.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Live your best life with the help of Tim Herrera of “

The Smarter Living section of the New York Times was created to help its readers live their best life and its editor, Tim Herrera, practices what the section preaches.
We caught up with Tim to ask him about the inspiration behind the new Times section, where he sees it going in the future, and what he’s been reading and saving to Pocket lately.
You are the editor of Smarter Living, the service journalism section of The New York Times that aims to help its readers understand the world and make the most of it.
People expect a lot from The Times, and we do our best to live up to those expectations.
You also write the weekly Smarter Living newsletter, which is a recap of The Times’ best advice for living a more fulfilling life.
How do you decide what Smarter Living is going to cover next?We’re lucky that we’re defined more thematically than topically, so our main driving force behind stories is just anything that helps readers live better lives.
What type of impact do you hope Smarter Living has on its readers? And where would you like to see the section go in the future?We have a pretty simple mandate: Help readers live better lives.
We’re really excited to develop more products and “Things” that help readers do that, so definitely something to keep an eye out for this year.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Be Good to Yourself: 10 Powerful Ways to Practice Self-Love”

No matter what happens on the outside, do you treat yourself with love, care, and respect or not?
If you’re in a place today where you don’t love yourself, it’s hard to take a quantum leap and become someone who does.
When you feel good about yourself, it means that what you’re thinking is aligned with how your soul/higher self sees you.
Choose to be most loving and forgiving with yourself when things don’t go as planned.
Ask yourself what you need and then spray that all over yourself.
Because let’s face it: It’s easy to love what you love about yourself and not so easy with the things you don’t.
You don’t need to love everything about yourself to develop self-love; all you need is acceptance.
Next time something happens that makes you want to get down on yourself, see this as your practice to accept what is.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Innocent Man, Part One”

The conviction had triggered a bitter custody battle between Christine’s family-who, like many people in Michael’s life, came to believe that he was guilty-and Michael’s parents.
The sheriff had never tried to reach Michael to notify him of Christine’s death, and once he arrived, their conversation at the kitchen table began with Boutwell’s reading Michael his Miranda rights.
His opinion of Michael was informed by the note left in the bathroom for Christine, which established that Michael had been angry with her in the hours leading up to her murder.
Sensing the drift of the conversation, Michael said at one point, “I didn’t do this, whatever it is.” Boutwell, who had not examined Christine’s injuries, had incorrectly surmised that she had been shot in the head at close range, and many of his questions focused on the guns that Michael kept in the house.
The two men had not known each other particularly well before Michael’s arrest-they had never socialized outside of work before-but Garcia, who had let Michael into the Safeway on the day Christine was murdered, had always been certain that he was innocent.
“They scared the tar out of her. They kept telling her, ‘You need to be careful. You don’t know what this guy is going to do.’ ” By then, Christopher told me, it was clear that Elizabeth’s testimony would be part of the prosecution’s case; she not only had discovered Christine’s body but also had overheard some of Michael’s less charitable comments to his wife.
On February 10, 1987, the morning that The State of Texas v. Michael W. Morton got under way, Michael put on a suit, kissed his son on the forehead, and handed the boy to his mother, Patricia, who had come from Kilgore with his father, Billy, to help out during the trial.
Erson’s portrait of Michael only darkened after DPS serologist Donna Stanley testified that a stain on the Mortons’ bedsheet contained semen that was consistent with Michael’s blood type.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Free Speech and the Necessity of Discomfort”

Intelligent coverage requires intelligent readers, viewers and listeners.
In sum, we cannot be the keepers of what you might call liberal civilization – I’m using the word liberal in its broad, philosophical sense, not the narrowly American ideological one – if our readers have illiberal instincts, incurious minds, short attention spans and even shorter fuses.
Nate Silver, the Times’s former polling guru, said the article did “More to normalize neo-Nazism than anything I’ve read in long time.” An editor at The Washington Post accused us of producing “Long, glowing profiles of Nazis” when we should have focused on the “Victims of their ideologies.” The Times followed up with an explanatory, and somewhat apologetic, note from the national editor.
Just what do these readers think a newspaper is supposed to do?
How can we get our readers to understand that the purpose of The Times is not to be a tacit partner in the so-called Resistance, which would only validate the administration’s charge that the paper is engaged in veiled partisanship rather than straight-up fact-finding and truth telling?
Again, do these readers comprehend that we are in the business of news, not public relations? And does it not also occur to them that perhaps the real problem was coverage that was not aggressive enough, allowing Mrs. Clinton to dominate the Democratic field in 2016 despite her serious, and only belatedly apparent, shortcomings as a candidate?
The word “Modest” might have been a tip-off to modestly educated readers that I was not proposing to ban Jews at all.
How many people bother to read before they condemn? Are people genuinely offended, or are they looking for a pretext to be offended – because taking offense is now the shortest route to political empowerment? Am I, as a columnist, no longer allowed to use irony as a rhetorical device because there’s always a risk that bigots and dimwits might take it the wrong way? Can I rely on context to make my point clear, or must I write in fear that any sentence can be ripped out of context and pasted on Twitter to be used against me? Is a plodding, Pravda-like earnestness of tone and substance the only safe way going forward?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Hot baths, saunas can relieve pain, help heart”

“The hot water makes me just feel so much better that it seems like all my troubles go away,” Benedict said, his wife at his side.
Benedict’s experience with hot water immersion and pain relief has science behind it.
“When you step into a hot bath and your core temperature goes up, a number of things happen that help with pain,” said Dr. David Burke, head of Emory University’s Center for Rehabilitative Medicine.
Beyond just pain relief, studies are finding there might be far more profound benefits to hot soaking and saunas, as well.
Burke says more studies haven’t been done in the United States because there aren’t large groups of people who use saunas and hot water immersion like the Finnish do.
The doctor cautions that soaking in hot baths or saunas is not for everyone at all times.
Benedict says his pain level and his blood pressure have both dropped significantly since he started going to the hot baths four years ago: “I was 150 over 90. I’m now 118 over 68.”.
Still, Benedict says, his pain relief from the hot baths can’t be understated.

The orginal article.

Summary of “When You’ve Procrastinated On Your Goals For Too Long”

In the beginning, when we set the goal, we feel usually motivated, for about a day.
As each additional day passes, the resistance starts to grow.
As more time passes by, we feel more overwhelmed, especially if we have attempted to start several times, and failed.
The biggest problem in this scenario is that we think of the sheer size of the goal, or to be more accurate, the list of the activities we need to do, and how much time it will take us to do them all.
There is nothing wrong with the big picture, on the contrary, we need it, but in the beginning, when it’s the planning phase.
Don’t think about the science or that you need 66 days to establish a habit, it will just overwhelm you additionally, which you don’t need.
Next, to the “ONE DAY” principle, the only other one you need is the consistency.
Let’s get down to concrete steps you can take a right this moment to take action and start working on your goal.

The orginal article.