Summary of “The Bookish Life by Joseph Epstein”

By the bookish life, I mean a life in which the reading of books has a central, even a dominating, place.
The first question is “How can one tell which books qualify as good, beautiful, important?” In an essay of 1978 called “On Reading Books: A Barbarian’s Cogitations,” Alexander ­Gerschenkron, a Harvard economist of wide learning, set out three criteria: A good book must be interesting, memorable, and rereadable.
Some of the best of all books are those one loved when young and finds even better in later life.
Reading may not be the same as conversation, but reading the right books, the best books, puts us in the company of men and women more intelligent than ourselves.
A precondition for reading good books is not reading bad ones: for life is short.
I’ve twice before made a run at Burton’s book, but it now begins to look as if I may have to finish finishing it in the next life.
In The Guermantes Way volume of his great novel, Proust has his narrator note a time when he knew “More books than people and literature better than life.” The best arrangement, like that between the head and the heart, is one of balance between life and reading.
You can get along without reading serious books-many extraordinary, large-hearted, highly intelligent people have-but why, given the chance, would you want to? Books make life so much richer, grander, more splendid.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 3 Rules Of Writing Successful Pitch Emails”

After “Failing” many times, I created 3 rules for sending pitch emails that actually work.
You open the email by saying something nice about the other person.
I know how much time it takes to craft one of these emails.
It will NOT work when you email people who get dozens of pitches per day.
Why? Well, if you’re able to describe exactly what your email is about in one short sentence, you’ve already accomplished your task.
So please keep this in mind: NEVER “FOLLOW UP” WITH PEOPLE. “What?” Yes, never mention in your emails that you’re following up.
“I never refer to a failed pitch attempt. Instead, I give it some time and reach out again. But the next time, I try an entirely different approach. It’s clear the first time didn’t work. So you need to be creative.”
That, my friend, is the key to sending good pitch emails.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The lost art of concentration: being distracted in a digital world”

We have known for a long time that repeated interruptions affect concentration.
“My mind would get caught up in the narrative or the turns of the argument, and I’d spend hours strolling through long stretches of prose. That’s rarely the case any more. Now my concentration often starts to drift after two or three pages. I get fidgety, lose the thread, begin looking for something else to do. I feel as if I’m always dragging my wayward brain back to the text. The deep reading that used to come naturally has become a struggle.”
Put simply, better concentration makes life easier and less stressful and we will be more productive.
Every time your concentration is interrupted by a stray thought, wait until the second hand is at the 12 again, and start again.
In an effort to improve concentration skills, it’s worth considering how looking at and then visualising something, can reinforce concentration.
There is no right or wrong way to do this, it’s just an opportunity to practise focus and improve concentration.
Music is often just a background noise but real, complicated musical notation can be more than just pleasurable, it can be a real boon to helping relearn concentration skills.
Like anything, single-minded attention may need relearning in order to enjoy reading for pleasure again, but close reading in itself can be a route to better concentration.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I Built My Multimillion-Dollar Side-Hustle While Working a Full-Time Job and So Can You”

Juggling a side hustle alongside a full-time commitment will stretch you in every way possible, but the rewards are even more fulfilling.
According to estimates, more than 44 million Americans have a side hustle.
Side hustles are a low-risk way to earn extra cash or explore a passion – and there’s always the chance they could become full time.
Within 11 months, my side hustle was generating more than $250K a month.
Use them as you launch your side hustle to maximize your chance of success.
Time is your biggest obstacle when running a side hustle.
Building a successful side hustle will change your life thanks to the new experiences, insane personal growth, and freedoms that come from being your own boss.
Juggling a side hustle alongside a full-time commitment will stretch you in every way possible.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Most Powerful Lesson My Cancer Taught Me About Life and Work”

My chemo experience taught me something I’m trying not to forget: The stories that we generate and tell ourselves can have huge effects on our behaviors and the results that we create.
Cancer changed my life by encouraging me to reexamine the stories I’d been telling myself, and to re-craft them with higher levels of construal.
My advice is don’t wait until you get cancer to improve your story of why you’re doing what you’re doing.
It doesn’t take much to craft a more meaningful story, and once you’ve developed one, you can leverage it to improve all aspects of your life and work – not just the big things.
If we choose more-meaningful stories about our work based on personal values, perspectives, and experience, we can interpret our impact in better ways and light ourselves up.
I experimented with this new story about teaching, and I found that it was not only more inspirational to me but also truer to my past and more consistent with what I had learned: Life is short, and we should get the most meaning that we can from it.
You will find that it is possible to change the story you tell about your work activities, and the evidence suggests that you will feel more inspired, energized, and resilient.
Change your behaviors to match the best story you can believe in, and you are more likely to inspire others and make your work more meaningful.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Will Guidara spends 5 percent of company budget foolishly”

4 minute Read. Years ago, a family of four from Spain spent the last night of their New York City vacation with us at Eleven Madison Park, at the height of the holiday season.
A chauffeur-driven SUV greeted them after their meal was over and whisked them away for a night of revelry in Central Park.
Before we get into the 5% side of the equation, let’s look at the other 95%. To the general public, Eleven Madison Park is known as a standard-bearer for fine dining, for earning four stars from the New York Times, and three stars from the Michelin Guide.
Those who have dined with us, at Eleven Madison Park and our other restaurants, know that we are also surprisingly fun.
If you join one of our weekly business meetings, you’d see some of the same people who “Host the party” every night in our dining rooms breaking down the bottom line with Terminator-like efficiency.
At Eleven Madison Park, we employ two “Dreamweavers,” whose job it is to create experiences comparable to what we did for that Spanish family.
It’s what makes our restaurants and our company such fun places to serve and be served.
Will Guidara is the co-owner of Make It Nice, a hospitality group that currently includes Eleven Madison Park, the NoMad restaurants, and Made Nice..

The orginal article.

Summary of “Working in quality time instead of clock time”

One of the things I love about our flexible work environment at Basecamp is the freedom to step away from something whenever I need to.
R&D work like this depends on having good mental and emotional energy.
When you’re tired, distracted, or in the weeds on something, it’s usually better to stop working.
I always find this difficult to do, because the working world tells us that full-time employees should put in 8+ consecutive hours no matter what.
The problem is, grinding it out is counterproductive for creative work, because creativity doesn’t happen on a linear time scale.
Then start thinking about productivity in terms of quality time instead of clock time.
I’m usually at my creative peak in the mid-morning and lose steam after lunch, so I shuffle my work accordingly.
You’ll be much happier and more effective, and your work will still get done in the end.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to stop watching TV and have more quality downtime”

So how do you shake up this routine and begin to invest your time in activities that truly satisfy and refresh you?
As a time management coach, I’ve seen that these five strategies can help you feel like you have more free time and feel happier with how you invest it.
Since free time is so limited, it’s essential that you prep in advance to take full advantage of your time.
Another little trick to give yourself the sense that you have more free time is to do more than one activity in an evening.
By doing multiple activities in one evening, it makes you feel like you experienced more within the same amount of time.
You should consider a more intentional approach to your free time.
Some small tweaks to how you spend it can make a huge impact to the sense that you have free time, your overall energy levels, and your satisfaction with life in general.
Elizabeth Grace Saunders is the author of Divine Time Management and How to Invest Your Time Like Money, and a time management coach.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why CEOs Devote So Much Time to Their Hobbies”

Does serious leisure make you a better leader? The few studies that have looked at the job performance of CEOs with strong hobbies show mixed results.
CEOs who are also pilots lead more innovative companies, and CEOs who run marathons show better company performance – but excessive CEO golfing may actually harm shareholder value.
We searched for public information on the hobbies of CEOs whose companies were in the S&P 500 index at the start of 2018.
To validate and enrich our findings from public sources, one of us conducted private interviews with 17 CEOs of S&P 500, Fortune 500, and similarly sized U.S. companies, asking about their hobbies – and if they had a serious leisure activity, what it meant to them and their ability to lead. In public and in private, CEOs state that their leisure interests help them cope with the ever-increasing demands of the top job.
Many CEOs opined that the complexity of the top job has increased dramatically, with diverse constituencies requiring their attention at any given time, and that they can never stop thinking about it, even in their free time.
While competitiveness certainly comes up as a motivation, for most of these CEOs it is truly about reaching one’s highest potential, a lesson they’ve transferred to leading.
CEOs used to be seen as all-powerful leaders who could singlehandedly change the direction and fate of their companies.
Wondering how you could possibly squeeze some room for serious leisure in between the solid blocks of your calendar? A recent HBR article showed that CEOs have, on average, about 2.1 hours a day for “Downtime,” meaning everything from simply relaxing to active hobbies, and even this time is probably highly fragmented during the day.

The orginal article.

Summary of “It’s Complicated: Dating Without Texting Is the Best”

I’d meet someone, and next thing I knew, we were texting more frequently than I text my best friends.
The difference, of course, is that texting your best friends is a fun diversion, whereas texting someone you’re interested in can feel exhilarating but also exhausting.
We would keep texting to logistics, like if one of us was running late, or if we needed the other to pick something up a key ingredient, like limes for the gin and tonics or American cheese for the burgers, on the way over.
Thank god for that; the truth is, texting had already derailed our relationship once.
Not wanting to leave him hanging, but also not wanting to share the details of my family’s situation, I texted back, “Running around text you in a bit 😘.”.
So we found ourselves sitting on his living room floor, with chicken thighs, wine, and later homemade chocolate chip cookies, discussing the possibility of continuing to see each other but ending our texting relationship.
Unlike a friendship, where not responding to a text for two hours is acceptable, in dating, both the act of texting and not texting communicate something.
With texting off the table, I found I could live my own life much more easily.

The orginal article.