Summary of “Why 99 Percent of All Meetings Are a Complete Waste of Money”

Here’s an elephant in the meeting room that no one ever discusses: Meetings are hugely expensive.
If the money came out of your pocket, would you have the meeting?
Any meeting that won’t directly generate revenue or cost savings-either in the form of a key decision or a concrete plan of action-is a complete waste of money.
If the group needs to make a decision during a meeting, shouldn’t they have the information they need to make that decision ahead of time? Send documents, reports, etc.
Holding a meeting to share information wastes the entire group’s time…and the company’s money.
So a meeting that will start at 9 is usually scheduled to run until 9:30 or 10, even if 10 minutes is all that is required to make a decision.
Don’t forget…if you only need 10 minutes, do you really need to hold the meeting?
Great meetings result in decisions, but a decision isn’t really a decision if it’s never carried it out.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Netflix Prize: How a $1 Million Coding Contest Changed Streaming”

The contest didn’t just catch the attention of college students with time to kill: An hour east of Princeton, in Middletown, New Jersey, the Netflix Prize announcement caught the eye of Chris Volinsky, head of a statistics research group at AT&T, and his team, who regularly read blogs to see what was going on in the emerging data science world.
“This was before ‘Big Data,'” he tells me, and therefore a Big Deal.
He pulled his group together and asked who wanted to poke around at the data set.
He didn’t know the contest would stretch on for years.
Hobbyists, academics, and professionals weren’t just drawn to the contest by the potential payday.
The revelations were just as enticing; because the winners would retain ownership of their work, a contestant like Volinsky could also pitch management at AT&T on devoting time and resources to the project.
Most importantly, the data was just plain interesting: an unruly mess of insights into taste, behavior, and pre-streaming viewer psychology.
As Chris Volinsky put it, “Everyone likes movies.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 Little Shifts that Will Make Your “Stressful” Life 5 Times Easier”

All the results in your life come from the little things.
You become successful over time from all the little things you do every day.
All the little things – if not corrected – become big things, over time.
Are the little things you’re doing every day working for you or against you?
These strategies gradually strengthen common weak points we’ve seen plaguing thousands of our course students, coaching clients, and live event attendees over the past decade – little things people do every day that stress them out and stop them from moving forward with their lives.
In his book, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, Stephen Covey explains that some things in life are important, and some things are just urgent.
Too often we spend our time and energy thinking about the desired end results of a big goal, instead of actually doing the little things that need to be done today.
You will have a hard time ever being happy if you aren’t thankful for the good things in your life right now.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The $5,000 decision to get rid of my past”

Someone broke into my apartment and stole my video game collection exactly four days later.
The collection included most of the important Dreamcast games.
The tyranny of a collection I was never not collecting video games.
Part of me believed that if I recreated the collection carefully enough, one evening I would wake up and she would be there, playing games in front of the TV in one of my shirts.
If I owned enough of those same games, I could create a portal back to the past and never have to move forward.
You carry your past with you The replacement collection, about 450 games deep when I stopped looking for the classics, was carried from house to house as I grew older.
One day, short on money to buy a certain Nintendo Switch game, I took down a few Super Nintendo games hoping to trade them in.
If GameStop gives you $1 for a game, that means it’s worth at least $5. I began to price out that long-dormant collection.

The orginal article.

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If you tell me that you desire a fig, I answer you that there must be time.
The basic message is that great things-projects, inventions, works of art, personal goals-take time and effort to produce.
Still, there’s something more to Epictetus’s comparison to figs and other fruits.
Not only does it take time to grow a fig, but there are several stages and transitions for the fig to reach its complete, edible stage.
You may hear tales of overnight successes from time to time, but you’re not getting the whole story.
You may be seeing their “Fig” for the first time, but they spent a lot of time and energy growing it.
Even a success as small as a fig, a fruit you can devour in a matter of seconds, requires time, growth, and milestones that must be met along the way.
Focus on turning your work into a plump, juicy fig that dangles temptingly from the tree of life.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Making the Most of Working From Home”

How is it possible to work from home and be productive with so many distractions and temptations? Your mindset and environment are just as important as good old-fashioned self-discipline as a recipe for remote work success.
Offsite workers tend to be productive even when they’re sick, and typically work five to seven more hours per week than their on-site counterparts.
One of the biggest perks of working alone in your home is boundary blurring.
Working in a chaotic house full of teens or kids, or just an elbow’s length away from a sink full of dirty dishes are both distractions you don’t need.
Work in small, intense periods of time, and can get work done in significant chunks.
“I work from home three days a week and am able to keep work and home separate simply because I have a six-year-old that demands my attention once she gets home from school,” says Beth Faris.
Many off-site workers stay glued to their work space all day, even when they can take breaks.
Ultimately, working off-site is best if you’re disciplined.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Chance The Rapper: Tiny Desk Concert”

Chance The Rapper knew he wanted to try a different approach for his Tiny Desk performance, so he decided to do something he said he hadn’t done in a long time.
Calling it “The Other Side,” Chance debuted it in the middle of his remarkable set, reading from his notes written out in black marker on sheets of typing paper.
Chance didn’t get much further before he was interrupted by one of the hazards of performing in an actual, working office: a building-wide page for someone to call the mailroom.
Chance rolled with it, cracking a quick joke before starting over again.
The night before arriving for his Tiny Desk set, Chance performed for more than 23,000 people at Jiffy Lube Live, an outdoor theater in Bristow, VA. The sold out arena and amphitheater shows of his current tour offer a stark contrast to the first time I saw Chance in concert back in 2013.
He was a 19-year old upstart rapping and singing for a handful of people at a tiny club in Austin, Texas.
Chance’s most recent mix tape, Coloring Book, was widely ranked among the best albums of 2016 and featured collaborations with a cast of hip-hop luminaries, from Kanye West to Lil Wayne and T-Pain.
Chance’s poem “The Other Side” was sandwiched between an opening version of “Juke Jam” from Coloring Book and another special gift just for his Tiny Desk appearance, a moving cover of Stevie Wonder’s 1974 song “They Won’t Go When I Go.”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Science Says This 1 Daily Practice Can Literally Change Your Brain and Make You More Successful”

Actually, mindfulness is increasingly backed by hard science.
According to a new scientific study published in Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, subjects who meditated for about 30 minutes a day for eight weeks had measurable changes in gray-matter density in parts of the brain associated with memory, sense of self, empathy, and stress.
You don’t need to sit in the lotus position on a beach to become more mindful.
If you have 30 minutes on the train every morning, why not use that time to close your eyes, slow your breathing, declutter your mind, and become mentally prepared for the day ahead. 3.
Ending a meeting in the same way can help wrap up your thoughts and clear your head for the next task ahead. It’s a simple way of reducing stress and keeping employees focused on one thing at a time.
To become more aware, really notice your surroundings; what can you see? Do you hear people talking? Maybe you can smell coffee brewing in the office kitchen.
Take time throughout the day to center yourself and become aware of your surroundings.
Many of you will find your mind wanders, but mindfulness is like anything – it takes practice and repetition.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The best thing Chief Justice Roberts wrote this term wasn’t a Supreme Court opinion”

Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. delivered eight opinions and two dissents in the just-concluded Supreme Court term.
Sitting up front under a large white tent as John Glover Roberts Jr. took the stage was graduating student John Glover Roberts III. In Canaan, N.H., Head of School Christopher Day said, the 17th chief justice of the United States would always be known as the dad of “Our Cardigan ­­Cougar Jack.”.
You may remember Jack Roberts from his own moment on the national stage 12 years ago, when his father was chosen for the Supreme Court.
Roberts is considered one of the Supreme Court’s better writers, and his public addresses show a quick wit and professional timing.
“From time to time in the years to come, I hope you will be treated unfairly,” Roberts said, “So that you will come to learn the value of justice.”
A commencement speech is supposed to offer “Grand advice,” Roberts said, so his first was to recognize the exalted perch from which they started – a school with a 4-to-1 student-teacher ratio, where students dine in jackets and ties, and tuition and board cost about $55,000.
“You’ve been at a school with just boys. Most of you will be going to a school with girls,” Roberts said.
The New York Times a few years ago noted a study that found Dylan the most-quoted songwriter in judicial opinions, and said Roberts had “Opened the floodgates” by quoting the Bard of Minnesota in a 2008 dissent.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Golden Age of Bailing”

You just pull out your phone and bailing on a rendezvous is as easy as canceling an Uber driver.
People feel free to bail on close friends, because they will understand, and on distant friends, because they don’t matter so much, but they are less inclined to bail on medium-tier or fragile friends.
A high-status person will frequently bail on a lower-status colleague, but if an intern bails on a senior executive, it is a sign of serious disrespect.
In the information age, the highly ambitious are masters of acquaintanceship – making a zillion useful contacts, understanding the strength of weak ties and bailing on a networking prospect with a killer-eyed coldness when a better offer comes along.
I’ve been reading the online discussions to understand the ethics and etiquette of bailing.
I’m delighted half the time when people bail on me.
We could, for example, create three moral hurdles every bail must meet.
Second, did you bail well or did you bail selfishly?

The orginal article.