Summary of “9 CEOs Share Their Favorite Productivity Hacks”

A study published in Harvard Business Review found that each week CEOs work an average of 62.5 hours and attend 37 meetings.
Moskovitz wants managers to be makers some of the time, so NMW ensures they get some flow time, too, he said.
“At the rate at which StockX is growing, it’s a 24-hour job and I spend 70 to 80 percent of my time on the road across varying time zones, which can be hard on your body. I take 11-minute naps once or twice per day and find that it makes for increased energy and efficiency.”
Katia Beauchamp, cofounder of Birchbox, says one of her best productivity tricks is something simple: She insists that her team includes a deadline in their email.
“Having fewer things to do is the best way to get things done. I’m very careful with my time and attention-it’s my most precious resource. If you don’t have that, you can’t do what you want to do. And if you can’t do what you want to do, what’s the point?”.
“The way to solve this is allow free flow of information between all levels. If, in order to get something done between depts, an individual contributor has to talk to their manager, who talks to a director, who talks to a VP, who talks to another VP, who talks to a director, who talks to a manager, who talks to someone doing the actual work, then super dumb things will happen. It must be ok for people to talk directly and just make the right thing happen.”
LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner sends fewer emails to receive fewer emails.
“If you have a list of 20 things to do, you end up realizing, ‘I don’t need to do 20 things,'” Chesky said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “4 Common Reasons Husbands Resent Their Wife”

Here’s the complicated brew of feelings actually at play when you feel like you hate your wife, according to experts, and what to do if you want to save your relationship.
“Every long term relationship has the opportunity to become a breeding ground for resentment, hurt feelings, anger, disappointments,” says Dr. Lisa Marie Bobby, marriage counselor, therapist, and life coach.
Bobby points out that many wives resent their husbands because “They often feel frazzled, frustrated, and resentful about the higher level of mental energy and material energy they are expected to devote to their household, career and families.” That can leave her little room for some soul-replenishing me-time, let alone you-and-she time.
“Male anger tends to be rooted not in frustration over tasks and responsibilities, but in a longing for love, fun, meaning, and a desire for a deeper connection with their partner. All of which they feel increasingly cut off from.”
“What I’ve often seen in my marriage counseling and couples therapy practice is that men are more likely than women to feel emotionally neglected by their partners,” Bobby says.
“When men lose any sense of their value, the feeling of failure or inadequacy can seep into everything,” D’Angelo continues.
“For women, the first step is often understanding, sometimes for the first time, that their husbands are just as in need of love, affection, and compassion as they are. Many women I talk to have little awareness that their husbands are craving hugs and kisses, time and attention, empathy, and to simply feel like they’re enjoying each other.”
Feeling too angry to even know where to begin talking to your wife about it? D’Angelo says seeing a therapist on your own is the best place to start.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Ultimate Guide for Reinventing Yourself”

The wonderful thing about proactively reinventing yourself is that it could serve to prevent the unnecessary and very uncomfortable need for reactive measures.
Now is a good time to consider whether or not there are things going on that call for a big change in your life or business.
For many years ahead, there would be more foreclosures than home purchases; the nosedive that Rebecca’s business took had no foreseeable end.
Rebecca had two choices: change careers or reinvent her current business.
Since the change was deliberate and well-executed, my client quickly became a sought-after expert for members of the press, both local and national.
If your current market is evolving or affected by change it may be wise to stop the struggle and reinvent yourself and your business now.
Our business coaching journey took a turn that Charlotte did not anticipate when I suggested she reinvent her business altogether.
If your business isn’t working out for any reason, examine your other gifts, experience, and knowledge.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Ultimate Guide for Reinventing Yourself”

The wonderful thing about proactively reinventing yourself is that it could serve to prevent the unnecessary and very uncomfortable need for reactive measures.
Now is a good time to consider whether or not there are things going on that call for a big change in your life or business.
For many years ahead, there would be more foreclosures than home purchases; the nosedive that Rebecca’s business took had no foreseeable end.
Rebecca had two choices: change careers or reinvent her current business.
Since the change was deliberate and well-executed, my client quickly became a sought-after expert for members of the press, both local and national.
If your current market is evolving or affected by change it may be wise to stop the struggle and reinvent yourself and your business now.
Our business coaching journey took a turn that Charlotte did not anticipate when I suggested she reinvent her business altogether.
If your business isn’t working out for any reason, examine your other gifts, experience, and knowledge.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Silicon Valley’s Crisis of Conscience”

Another iconic image of Esalen is a fictional one: the final scene of “Mad Men.” Don Draper sits, cross-legged and ill at ease, on the Esalen lawn.
Esalen is just outside Silicon Valley, so the executives who visit it have come from the likes of Intel and Xerox PARC-and, more recently, from Apple and Google and Twitter.
“There’s a dawning consciousness emerging in Silicon Valley as people recognize that their conventional success isn’t necessarily making the world a better place,” he told the Times.
“The C.E.O.s, inside they’re hurting. They can’t sleep at night.” If the tech tycoons were already going to Esalen for ethical and spiritual guidance, then perhaps Esalen could guide them toward a less rapacious business model.
For a long time, the prevailing posture of the Silicon Valley élite was smugness bordering on hubris.
For all the talk of Esalen becoming a beacon of moral guidance for the tech √©lite, the institute’s public schedule looks much as it did in the seventies.
After the piece about Esalen ran in the Times, a new C.E.O. was installed in Tauber’s place, and Esalen’s leadership tried to reassure its Aquarian customer base that their beloved sanctuary would not be overrun by tech bros.
“Esalen played its own part in the collapse of Soviet Communism,” Jeffrey Kripal, a professor at Rice University, wrote in his 2007 book, “Esalen: America and the Religion of No Religion.” If hot-tub diplomacy could help thaw the Cold War, surely it can help diminish human downgrading.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Forgotten History of New York’s Bagel Famines”

A bagel served with lox and cream cheese at Kutsher’s restaurant in New York, 1977.
As hundreds of thousands of Jews swept into New York ahead of the First World War, dozens of Jewish bakeries opened on the Lower East Side, mostly staffed by young Jewish men providing their friends and families with challah, rye bread, and bagels.
At first, bagel truck drivers did not strike with them-but the ire of the bagel bakers was considerable.
Now, New York City, the paper decreed, was “The bagel center of the free world, and will doubtless be kept that way by the hundreds of thousands of residents who find that a bagel makes breakfast almost worth getting up for.”
With near-unlimited control over the bagel market, they struck for 29 days in 1962, resisting state attempts at mediation and reducing the city’s bagel supply by 85 percent.
The bagel makers vowed to picket the machines “Round the clock” if they made it into New York, but their machismo was no match for automation.
Some opened their own stores outside New York and introduced bagels across the country.
In the space of less than a century, New York’s bagel bakers had gone from making a niche product and being exploited for it, to being one of the city’s strongest unions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why More Knowledge Won’t Make You More Successful”

In today’s startup climate, it’s tempting to think that learning more will strengthen your competitive advantage.
Because what matters is not how much you learn, but the ability to home in and apply what you learn strategically.
According to Bloom’s Taxonomy, a hierarchy of learning objectives used by K-12 teachers and college instructors, the highest level of learning happens when we create – generating, planning and producing original material or ideas – using new knowledge.
That’s probably why the world’s most successful entrepreneurs intersperse knowledge acquisition with creative experimentation – to immediately put their learning to use.
With a beginner’s mind, you not only identify blind spots in your knowledge, you learn to approach new areas with humility and curiosity.
We learned to eat, to crawl, to walk and to talk because of an innate interest.
By returning to the pursuit of those things that genuinely interest us, we can learn more effectively.
When it comes to learning, sometimes less is more – because less quantity can mean more quality and increased efficacy as a leader.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Be a Better Friend in the Digital Age”

“We see our friends, and our friends see us, with a clarity that other people don’t-not even our romantic partners,” says Lauren Mechling, whose novel How Could She explores the complexities of female friendship.
Social media has turned friend into a verb, not just a thing that we are but a thing that we do-or undo, as in the Orwellian-sounding unfriend.
That’s the spirit in which we crafted our guide to being a better friend in the digital age.
If your friend is dealing with something big-divorce, a death, a troubled child, a career shift-your job is to be with her in person or at least call.
Pandora’s Email: An incendiary message that delves into all the faults of a friend you’re angry at-which you accidentally send directly to said friend.
One reason is simply that we know our friends so well: Research has shown that we’re better at describing our friends’ creative skills and intelligence levels than they are themselves.
“I had a friend in high school who was brilliant and very bossy,” says Roz Chast, illustrator of Why Don’t You Write My Eulogy Now So I Can Correct It?, a collaboration with longtime friend and writer Patty Marx.
“I didn’t ask because I thought, It’s not going to be a good reason. It’s not ‘I love you so much that I can’t bring myself to talk to you.’ And eventually, she started talking to me again.The Companion Commandments.Thou shalt not post a photo in which your friend has a double chin or is holding a margarita in a foot-tall plastic cup with a crazy straw.Thou shalt not leave effusive, encouraging comments on the post of your dear friend’s enemy or ex.Thou shalt not divulge personal details on a friend’s Facebook page, no matter how badly you’re wondering,”how did Gary’s vasectomy go??”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I’ll Be Loving You Forever”

Gretchen knew how to suck out mosquito and bee venom with a syringe.
Gretchen knew how to escape from a mugger, if the situation ever arose.
For some reason, despite the fact that I was weird and definitely talked too much, Gretchen wanted to be my friend.
“I’ve liked them since ‘Please Don’t Go Girl’.” Like I said: Gretchen knew everything.
What’cha Gonna Do. The noxious combination of mainstream backlash, an aging fanbase in search of a new transitional object, and a rapidly changing musical landscape – my 1993 anthem with Gretchen was “Smells Like Teen Spirit” – finally caught up with NKOTB in 1994.
It’s nearing 11:00 by the time Gretchen and I sneak onto the MAX along with approximately 400 other ladies of a certain age wearing similar garb.
As the train drops off more passengers and approaches Gretchen’s stop, I’m no longer thinking about Joey McIntyre’s stage presence or Jordan Knight’s unfortunate politics.
Most of the snaps Gretchen takes are kid-only, but I’m in a few of them, still wearing my NKOTB shirt.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Meet the Gamer Grandpas: The Seniors Who Spend Retirement Playing ‘Fortnite'”

“I had an online friend who I knew was a serious gamer – she’d even reviewed games for a magazine for a time – and I asked her to recommend a game and teach me how to play it,” he tells me.
“If I’m really into a game, I’ll play during weekdays as well.” And while Star Wars: The Old Republic is still his favorite – “It’s like comfort food; I’ve played all factions, characters and expansions, sometimes several times” – he also enjoys trying new games.
Obviously, it’s probably inevitable that younger generations who have grown up with video games will wheel a cart full of controllers and game systems into retirement homes.
In retirement Michael plays almost every night, “After supper and time with the wife, for about two hours. I try to limit it to that so it won’t get out of hand. It’s a great way to spend time, and it’s fundamentally good to challenge your brain with puzzles and hand-eye difficulties. People, especially us males, need archetypal hero stories and the means to strive to be that hero. Games are a safe place to achieve those needs.”
“It always bugged me that people will sit and watch eight hours of television, but then say playing video games is a waste of time,” adds John, a 60-year-old in San Francisco who dedicates roughly three hours a day to gaming.
“Loneliness is a growing issue with seniors, but gaming grandpas are able to find community in their favorite video games – whether that’s literally in video games, or simply having something in common with younger generations. John, for example,”spent a lot of time playing World of Warcraft and was in a guild, had a real-life meetup with all of the members in San Francisco to see the Warcraft movie.
“I plan to game for as long as I can,” Michael responds when I ask him if he’ll eventually bring his games to a retirement home.
“Well, my generation invented the internet and all the technologies that go along with it. So for those of us seniors who have been using computers for years, gaming provides a wonderful way to structure our time and to have fun. Honestly, gaming has been nothing less than a great boon to seniors.”

The orginal article.