Summary of “BuzzFeed Top Traffic Came From Quizzes Made by Teen for Free”

BuzzFeed Top Traffic Came From Quizzes Made by Teen for Free Rachel McMahon is a teen from Michigan you almost certainly haven’t heard of before this week.
Her name appeared in a blog post from BuzzFeed’s former head of quizzes and games, Matthew Perpetua, where he noted that McMahon was the “Second highest traffic driver worldwide” for the site’s quizzes.
McMahon has contributed hundreds of quizzes for free – BuzzFeed has for years allowed and encouraged so-called community users to submit quizzes without paying them – and says she never really had any idea how much traffic, and by extension revenue, she was bringing the company.
We had computers with us all the time and I would always get my deadlines done fast, so at free time me and my friend Katie would take quizzes.
If you go to your BuzzFeed account, there’s a dashboard and it shows you some of the viral trends and it also shows you your top posts in the last 30 days.
What really helped was when I got added to a BuzzFeed community Facebook page by BuzzFeed workers.
Like if it was near Christmas, they’d be like, “Oh it’s a Christmas challenge, make as many Christmas-related quizzes and post them in here and we’ll promote them.” The workers helped give me ideas on quizzes.
Toward the end of the year, BuzzFeed actually sent me a package with some clothes and water bottles, a recipe book, and a coffee mug – BuzzFeed swag stuff, I think you can actually buy it online.

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Summary of “The California Sunday Magazine”

During the Bush years, this rhetorical tic greased our path into the Iraq quagmire, of course, but it also helped shoehorn the country into its massive mortgage crisis: Bush’s “Ownership society” nudged millions of citizens into bad loans on the premise of “More freedom and more control over your own life.” Before that, he launched the USA Freedom Corps in 2002, followed by the so-called Freedom Agenda, his tectonic foreign-policy shift away from “[s]ixty years of Western nations excusing and accommodating the lack of freedom in the Middle East.”.
Eager to shed its establishment vibe, corporate America long ago co-opted the personal-freedom language of the ’60s. The CEO of Dreyer’s has equated ice cream with freedom, and skin-care professionals have linked freedom with the removal of unsightly neck bands.
The Scientologists put out the magazine Freedom, and the Valley Forge Freedom played hockey.
You may “Learn to beat the IRS” at Freedom Law School or live in any of more than a dozen places in the U.S. called Freedom.
Hum “Full Tank of Freedom” enough and you start wondering if commercials like these sell us a desire for freedom as much as anything.
Freedom is what’s been taken, and freedom is what they have left.
Arranged near her was a collection of hats doing just that, ostensibly focused on the Second Amendment but with broader overtones: Don’t tread on my freedom and Freedom isn’t free and Free men don’t need permission.
There is external freedom and there is internal freedom.

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Summary of “The Shortness of Life: Seneca on Busyness and the Art of Living Wide Rather Than Living Long”

It is unsurprising that the best treatment of the subject is also among the oldest: Roman philosopher Seneca’s spectacular 2,000-year-old treatise On the Shortness of Life – a poignant reminder of what we so deeply intuit yet so easily forget and so chronically fail to put into practice.
Life is long enough, and a sufficiently generous amount has been given to us for the highest achievements if it were all well invested.
So it is: we are not given a short life but we make it short, and we are not ill-supplied but wasteful of it Life is long if you know how to use it.
You act like mortals in all that you fear, and like immortals in all that you desire How late it is to begin really to live just when life must end! How stupid to forget our mortality, and put off sensible plans to our fiftieth and sixtieth years, aiming to begin life from a point at which few have arrived!
Living is the least important activity of the preoccupied man; yet there is nothing which is harder to learn Learning how to live takes a whole life, and, which may surprise you more, it takes a whole life to learn how to die.
So you must not think a man has lived long because he has white hair and wrinkles: he has not lived long, just existed long.
Perhaps unsurprisingly, given his own occupation, Seneca points to the study of philosophy as the only worthwhile occupation of the mind and spirit – an invaluable teacher that helps us learn how to inhabit our own selves fully in this “Brief and transient spell” of existence and expands our short lives sideways, so that we may live wide rather than long.
On the Shortness of Life is a sublime read in its pithy totality.

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Summary of “Meet the man behind a third of what’s on Wikipedia”

Steven Pruitt has made nearly 3 million edits on Wikipedia and written 35,000 original articles.
Pruitt was named one of the most influential people on the internet by Time magazine in part because one-third of all English language articles on Wikipedia have been edited by Steven.
“My first article was about Peter Francisco, who was my great great great great great great grandfather and if we had an hour I could probably go into the full story,” Pruitt said.
Still living with his parents in the home he grew up in, Pruitt has always remained true to his interests.
“Because I edit Wikipedia all the damn time, I think that one sort of goes without saying,” Pruitt said.
“People like Steven are incredibly important to platforms like Wikipedia, simply because they are the ones that are the lifeblood,” said Kui Kinyanjui, WikiMedia’s vice president of communications.
“The last statistic I saw was that 17.6 percent of the biographical articles on Wikipedia area about women, on the English Wikipedia I should say,” Pruitt said.
To put in to perspective what it took for Pruitt to become the top editor, he’s been dedicating his free time to the site for 13 years.

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Summary of “Time for Happiness”

Some of the best time diary research suggests that in the United States, men’s leisure time has increased by six to nine hours a week over the past 50 years, and women’s leisure time has risen four to eight hours a week.
If the solution to time poverty is so simple – just make choices that give you more time – then why are we all still stressed?
Because we overestimate the amount of time needed to enjoy an experience, we end up wasting small pockets of free time that we could use more effectively.
Last, we suffer from something called future time slack – the belief that we’ll have more time in the future than we do in the present.
HR departments may think that how employees choose between time and money has little to do with them, but a large body of research shows that organizational factors shape the way employees perceive their time and can increase their feelings of stress and undermine social connections and happiness.
The Long View We should also think about how our money and time decisions might have consequences for our happiness farther down the road. If we choose a job in which we make a lot of money but work 80 hours a week, our personal relationships and happiness could suffer in the long term.
My data suggests that as people age and have objectively less time left in their lives, they naturally start to favor more time over more money in their decisions.
Ask yourself whether you make it easier for your employees to ask for more time to complete projects, to spend less time stuck in traffic, to waste less time taking cheaper indirect flights, to reduce their stress and improve their productivity.

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Summary of “How Bulletproof Founder Dave Asprey Became the Ultimate Biohacker”

Ten days before I met him at his home in British Columbia, Dave Asprey went to a clinic in Park City, Utah, where a surgeon harvested half a liter of bone marrow from his hips, filtered out the stem cells, and injected them into every joint in his body.
Currently, Asprey is best known as the founder of Bulletproof Coffee; he’s the reason everyone started slipping a pat of butter into their coffee a few years back.
While the coffee is what put Asprey on the map, his aspirations are much bigger than that-and having the longest human life span ever recorded is just one part of his plan.
Asprey happily shares his opinion on how often men should ejaculate and how long they should sleep.
At the same time, Asprey didn’t feel like his best self.
At first, Asprey followed the standard medical advice for losing weight-restrict calories, exercise-but even when he was working out for 90 minutes and eating 1,500 to 1,800 calories a day, he wasn’t dropping pounds.
Finally the time was ripe for Asprey, a guy who had been tweaking his own internal systems for years; who knew how to help you get a better return on your meditation investment; who claimed he could feel when his mitochondria were underperforming; who promised strategies for turning humans into superhumans.
In 2017, Asprey opened Bulletproof Labs, a gymlike facility in Santa Monica where you can play around with his favorite biohacking tools.

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Summary of “Stop Trying To Do Everything”

There’s one important thing about all this working, hustling, striving, and achieving more: You can’t do everything at the same time.
So if you take on too many things, you end up spread too thin.
Success Adds Up. Real success happens when we focus on one thing at a time.
“Where I’d had huge success, I had narrowed my concentration to one thing, and where my success varied, my focus had too.”
Are you working on a lot of things? Is your attention not on one thing? There’s a big chance that you will not achieve the best possible results.
Another thing: Buffett acquired 99% of his net worth after he became 50.
You can achieve big things with small actions, that build up over time.
If you want to see the impact of compounding in your own life, it requires you to focus on one thing at a time and always look at the bigger picture.

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Summary of “Resilience Is About Recharging, Not Endurance”

We race to get all our ground work done: packing, going through TSA, doing a last-minute work call, calling each other, then boarding the plane.
Lack of recovery – whether by disrupting sleep with thoughts of work or having continuous cognitive arousal by watching our phones – is costing our companies $62 billion a year in lost productivity.
We “Stop” work sometimes at 5PM, but then we spend the night wrestling with solutions to work problems, talking about our work over dinner, and falling asleep thinking about how much work we’ll do tomorrow.
The scientists cite a definition of “Workaholism” as “Being overly concerned about work, driven by an uncontrollable work motivation, and investing so much time and effort to work that it impairs other important life areas.”
In her excellent book, The Sleep Revolution, Arianna Huffington wrote, “We sacrifice sleep in the name of productivity, but ironically our loss of sleep, despite the extra hours we spend at work, adds up to 11 days of lost productivity per year per worker, or about $2,280.”
If you’re trying to build resilience at work, you need adequate internal and external recovery periods.
Try to not have lunch at your desk, but instead spend time outside or with your friends – not talking about work.
We are usually tired already by the time we get on a plane, and the cramped space and spotty internet connection make work more challenging.

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Summary of “How to Spend Way Less Time on Email Every Day”

Our team at Zarvana – a company that teaches research-backed time management practices – set out to see if there is a data-supported way to reduce the 2.6 daily hours spent on email without sacrificing effectiveness.
What we found surprised even us: we realized we could save more than half of the time we currently spend on email, or one hour and 21 minutes per day.
If people checked their email hourly rather than every 37 minutes, they could cut six email checks from their day.
Between checking email six times more than needed, letting notifications interrupt us, and taking time to get back on track, we lose 21 minutes per day.
Turn off notifications and schedule time every hour to check email.
If people go to their inboxes 15 times per day and spend just four seconds looking at each email and re-reading only 10% of them, they’ll lose 27 minutes each day.
Roughly 10% of the total time people spend on email is spent filing messages they want to keep, a process that involves two phases: deciding where the emails should go and then moving them to the selected folders.
Move every email out of your inbox the first time you read it.

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Summary of “Does Journalism Have a Future?”

“We are, for the first time in modern history, facing the prospect of how societies would exist without reliable news,” Alan Rusbridger, for twenty years the editor-in-chief of the Guardian, writes in “Breaking News: The Remaking of Journalism and Why It Matters Now.” “There are not that many places left that do quality news well or even aim to do it at all,” Jill Abramson, a former executive editor of the New York Times, writes in “Merchants of Truth: The Business of News and the Fight for Facts.” Like most big-paper reporters and editors who write about the crisis of journalism, Rusbridger and Abramson are interested in national and international news organizations.
In the past half century, and especially in the past two decades, journalism itself-the way news is covered, reported, written, and edited-has changed, including in ways that have made possible the rise of fake news, and not only because of mergers and acquisitions, and corporate ownership, and job losses, and Google Search, and Facebook and BuzzFeed.
“Watergate, like Vietnam, had obscured one of the central new facts about the role of journalism in America,” Halberstam wrote.
The view of the new journalism held by people like my father escaped Halberstam’s notice.
In “On Press: The Liberal Values That Shaped the News,” the historian Matthew Pressman argues that any understanding of the crisis of journalism in the twenty-first century has to begin by vanquishing the ghost of Spiro T. Agnew.
Breitbart left the Huffington Post and started Breitbart News around the same time that Peretti left to focus on his own company, Contagious Media, from which he launched BuzzFeed, where he tested the limits of virality with offerings like the seven best links about gay penguins and “YouTube Porn Hacks.” He explained his methods in a pitch to venture capitalists: “Raw buzz is automatically published the moment it is detected by our algorithm,” and “The future of the industry is advertising as content.”
Even as news organizations were pruning reporters and editors, Facebook was pruning its users’ news, with the commercially appealing but ethically indefensible idea that people should see only the news they want to see.
By some measures, journalism entered a new, Trumpian, gold-plated age during the 2016 campaign, with the Trump bump, when news organizations found that the more they featured Trump the better their Chartbeat numbers, which, arguably, is a lot of what got him elected.

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