Summary of “Brazil’s Museum Fire: 200 Years of Work Lost”

Over the past five years, the museum faced severe cuts and didn’t even receive its full allotted funds from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro.
“For many years, we fought with different governments to get adequate resources to preserve what is now completely destroyed,” Luiz Fernando Dias Duarte, the museum’s deputy director, has said.
The museum’s herbarium, its main library, and some of its vertebrates were housed in a different building that was untouched by the fire.
These reportedly account for just 10 percent of the museum’s collection.
For comparison, the remaining 90 percent includes twice as many specimens as the entire British Museum.
Museum staff carried out whatever they could by hand, including parts of the mollusk collection.
The museum’s archeological collection had frescoes from Pompeii, and hundreds of Egyptian artifacts, including a 2,700-year-old painted sarcophagus.
Older still was the museum’s rich trove of fossils, from crocodile relatives like Pepesuchus to one of the oldest relatives of today’s scorpions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Anonymous New York Times Op-Ed and the Trumpian Corruption of Language and the Media”

Let’s get the obvious points out of the way first: the anonymous Op-Ed published by the Times on Wednesday was a ploy by someone who wants to distance himself from what he perceives to be an imperilled Administration, while capitalizing on whatever credibility and popularity the Presidency still retains.
Only the day before the Op-Ed was published, excerpts from Bob Woodward’s new book, “Fear,” added to the ever-accumulating picture of chaos, mendacity, fear, embattlement, and contempt for the President even within his senior staff.
While the content of the anonymous Op-Ed is not newsworthy, in the sense of providing new information, the fact of its publication certainly is.
The article asserts that the country is, to some extent, governed not by the President but by a group of people who have taken it upon themselves to moderate, modify, and even block the President’s actions, or, as the anonymous author puts it, his “Worst inclinations.” We suspected as much-Woodward, for one, described how the former economic adviser Gary Cohn swiped documents from Trump’s desk, lest he act on them precipitously.
By publishing the anonymous Op-Ed, the Times became complicit in its own corruption.
The way in which the news media are being corrupted-even an outlet like the Times, which continues to publish remarkable investigative work throughout this era-is one of the most insidious, pronounced, and likely long-lasting effects of the Trump Administration.
The media are being corrupted every time they engage with a nonsensical, false, or hateful Trump tweet.
The anonymous Op-Ed was a corrupting event not only because the Times allowed itself to become the keeper of a secret that shouldn’t be kept but also because it was a remarkable example of the Trumpian corruption of political language.

The orginal article.

Summary of “”Female” Is Not a Musical Genre-It’s a Strength”

It’s an incredibly romantic declaration, but Mitski has admitted that most of her love songs are not about other people so much as they are about “Music and trying to pursue it and not feeling loved by it. A lot of the ‘yous’ in my songs are abstract ideas about music.” On “A Pearl,” she tells what seems this time like a human “You”: “Sorry I can’t take your touch.” The problem is that she’s been through a war that “Left a pearl in my hand and I roll it around every night, just to watch it glow.” And so our heroine rides solemnly into the sunset, away from the world of flesh and into the realm of creativity, art, and ideas.
Its lyrics are partially a collage of things disbelieving men have said to Camp Cope over the years, about how their success was the result of luck rather than hard work, about how they should book a smaller venue because they might not be able to fill up the room, about how promoters aren’t the ones at fault for booking all-male shows because there “Just aren’t that many girls in the music scene.” Drummer Sarah Thompson was astonished at the breadth of the song when Maq sent her the demo: “I was so impressed Georgia literally rhymed all these things.”
“The Face of God” is one of the most devastating songs the band has ever released, and although Maq wrote it before the #MeToo movement, the recent onslaught of similar stories gives the song a new power.
Nashville-born Allison had been playing guitar her “Whole life” and every summer attended the Southern Girls Rock Camp, where she was free to unleash her inner rockstar-“Every year I would get my hair done up in a mohawk, full-on teased and sprayed up”-she did not feel emboldened to share her songs with other people until college, because she “Didn’t feel like people would take it seriously.” But within a few years recording under the name Soccer Mommy, that has proved untrue.
At its most raging, Allison has said that the record is about “That feeling of wanting to be perfect but not being perfect.” Her songs are alive with the energy of a young woman realizing, after so many years of being constantly told otherwise, her faults are not her fault.
“Mary has a heart of cold, she’ll break you down and eat you whole,” Allison marvels, as friend-crush-struck as Kathleen Hanna is in “Rebel Girl.” “I saw her do it after school-she’s an animal.” Allison sings the song to a boy, but they’re linked in their mutual awe of Mary: “I wanna know her, like you.” It’s the most romantic song on the record.
The songs, she’s said, form “a nice mix of not giving a fuck and giving a fuck,” which feels like as good as any a description of what’s required for a girl who’s alive in the United States in 2018.
Decades of lazy “Women in Rock” articles have polluted the atmosphere so thoroughly that it seems impossible to talk about more than one female artist together without conjuring images of wind machines gently mussing tresses, leather pants, and god-awful adjectives like “Kick-ass.” I don’t want to suggest that all of these bands sound alike, or that they are the only exciting female artists making rock music, or that female is ever, under any circumstance, a genre.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Work 40 Hours in 16.7”

No matter how many hours I worked, it never seemed to fill it up.
Everything in just 16.7 hours a week?!Right now you’re probably thinking, “I work more than that in two days! And you’re trying to tell me that’s all I need to work in an entire week?”.
I truly work 16.7 hours each weekand I get about five times more accomplished in those few hours than in the other 25 hours.
You can work smarter without having to work harder.
I’d be equally enthusiastic and motivated about each one, wouldn’t be interrupted, and would finish my day’s work in less than three hours.
My energy level and attitude affect my work and output, so I had to stay present to how I was feeling, and master myself.
Of course, I also had to find work I enjoyed, that fulfilled merather than work that drained me.
Want to go further?Slowly but surely, Pomodoro has forever change how I work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to minimize jet lag? Here’s what the doctors order.”

Caldwell explains that while our bodies are able to adjust to about one time zone change per day, jet lag sets in when we cross three or more of them, because it wreaks havoc on our circadian rhythms.
Work to align your sleep schedule with your destination: Because your body can naturally adjust to about only one time-zone change per day, you’ll want to manually adjust your schedule, and that means changing your bedtime to be better mesh with the destination to which you’re traveling.
To be ready to hit the ground running when she arrives, she starts adjusting her bedtime two to five days in advance to match the local time at her destination.
Caldwell creates a timetable so that, at a glance, he can see what time it is at home and at his destination and plan accordingly.
“Similarly, bright light exposure after waking up also will help advance our biological clock to suit the new time zone.” When traveling westward, he adds, the biological clock is ahead of the latest time zone.
It provides a brief plan to avoid jet lag, sharing the ideal time to get to sleep and the ideal time for light exposure.
“Taking a very small dose helps to recalibrate its release so that it is in sync with the time zone of your destination,” says Kern Singh, a spine surgeon in Chicago with Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush.
Turn your wine into water: Having a glass of wine or two on the plane may sound tempting, but it could negatively impact your sleep, which could worsen jet lag, says Quay Snyder, president and CEO of Aviation Medicine Advisory Service of Centennial, Colo., who advises pilots on staying in top condition while in the air.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Scientists found brain’s internal clock that influences how we perceive time”

Now, a team of Norwegian scientists has confirmed the mechanism the brain uses to make sense of the passage of time as we experience something, thanks to the help of a chocolate-loving lab rat.
Manmade clocks may precisely measure time from a human perspective, the passage of time is remarkably fluid.
Isolate yourself from any markers of time and you will feel less time has passed than actually has, because under those circumstances, the brain condenses time.
How the brain fixes the timing of the events we experience depends on episodic memory.
Our time tracking system has to be flexible because the perception of time depends on context.
How your brain records the passage of time when you are engaged in a mundane repetitive task like playing Solitaire will be different from how it does so if you are experiencing Thai food for the first time.
“The time signal became more precise and predictable during the repetitive task.” They were seeing the changing shape of time in response to different experiences.
“We have found an area with activity so strongly relating to the time of an event or experience, it may open up a whole new research field,” he said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “3 Tricks to Get People to Actually Listen to Your Presentations”

As challenging as it can be, the reward is far greater when audiences walk away remembering and acting upon what you shared.
Sharing a story is a great way to immediately engage your audience, helping them relate to the topic in a personal way.
Presenters quickly lose their audience’s attention when they fail to recognize when it’s time to stop talking.
Successful presentations use a variety of mediums to make their point, such as slides, props and audience participation.
Even if you’re trying to train your audience on using a gadget, process, system or device, balance prop interaction with your presentation.
Allow the audience to interact and process what they see you do without being distracted by your gabbing.
If you encourage open questions, engage the audience by inviting them to do so during topic transitions.
If you’re going to engage your audience from the beginning to the very end, the takeaway must be strong and purposeful.

The orginal article.

Summary of “4 Strategies for Overcoming Distraction”

So how can you gain back control? After reading hundreds of studies, interviewing dozens of experts, and running the gambit of self-experiments, I learned that countless strategies can help us mitigate distraction.
After focusing for 45 minutes, I treat myself to a 10-minute all-you-can-eat distraction buffet.
Distractions happen 64% more often in an open office, and we’re interrupted by others more often in that environment as well.
Our work tends to expand to fill the time we have available for its completion, and any excess time remaining is usually filled with distractions.
Sometimes distractions come from internal and external factors, but other times they happen because we’re not being challenged enough by our work.
If it’s high, that’s usually a sign that you have the capacity to take on more-challenging projects, and perhaps even more work in general.
We can’t help that our minds crave distraction.
What we can do is set ourselves up for success by adopting strategies to block distractions ahead of time, work with greater intention, and reclaim our attention, once and for all.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This Is Why Understanding Time Is So Hard”

In April, in the famous Faraday Theatre at the Royal Institution in London, Carlo Rovelli gave an hour-long lecture on the nature of time.
Unlike general relativity, quantum mechanics, and particle physics, thermodynamics embeds a direction of time.
Its second law states that the total entropy, or disorder, in an isolated system never decreases over time.
Second, since a clock, like every object, is quantum, it can be in a superposition of time readings.
“You cannot say between this event and this event is a certain amount of time, because, as always in quantum mechanics, there could be a probability distribution of time passing.” Which means that, third, in quantum gravity, you can have “a local notion of a sequence of events, which is a minimal notion of time, and that’s the only thing that remains,” Rovelli said.
Events aren’t ordered in a line “But are confused and connected” to each other without “a preferred time variable-anything can work as a variable.”
Listening to Rovelli’s description, I was reminded of a phrase from his new book, The Order of Time: Studying time “Is like holding a snowflake in your hands: gradually, as you study it, it melts between your fingers and vanishes.”
WATCH: Why the nature of time is such a central issue for theoretical physics.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to deal with jet lag”

Someone has probably told you that, in order to combat jet lag, you should fight your urge to sleep and stay awake until it’s nighttime in your new time zone.
You can be pumped full of adenosine because you haven’t slept in a day, but if it’s peak “Daytime” in your circadian cycle you will still have a difficult time sleeping.
“If there’s something known as too much sleep, we haven’t found it yet,” Matthew Walker, neuroscientist and author of Why We Sleep, which explains the state of contemporary sleep science and how the modern world has largely deprived us of it, told me.
Melatonin pills, which contain the natural hormone that our bodies produce to help us sleep, may help you drift off but they won’t make your sleep long or good or address the very common jet-lag problem of interrupted sleep.
Sleeping pills probably aren’t worth taking, for jet lag, or for anything.
“Existing sleeping pills are minimally helpful,” Walker writes in his book, but one study performed on animals indicates that Ambien significantly weakens the brain’s ability to form memories while sleeping, one of the main purposes of lying down in the first place.
When I do need to make the Eastward shift, what will happen is that, no matter how well I timed my first day or whatever, I will soon find myself wide awake from midnight until 6 a.m. It will only be at around 7 a.m. that I can sleep, and by 9 a.m. I will really want to sleep.
In your normal life, you can probably stay up until 3 a.m. But if you are already fatigued from travel, then try to get to bed at your internal 8 p.m., toss and turn for hours only to get a tiny bit of sleep between your circadian 1 a.m. and 3 a.m. and then try wake up for daytime activities, with the full light of the sun in your face, you will feel insane.

The orginal article.