Summary of “5 Research-Based Strategies for Overcoming Procrastination”

In one time log I kept, I found that over the course of one week, I spent six hours putting off tasks – and that’s just the procrastination that was apparent from my time log.
The more averse you find a task, the more likely you are to procrastinate.
When a task sets off procrastination triggers, we resist doing it.
What about 30 minutes? Shorten the amount of time until you find a period with which you’re no longer resistant to the task – and then do it.
That’s because the tasks that induce procrastination are rarely as bad as we think.
Getting started on something forces a subconscious reappraisal of that work, where we might find that the actual task sets off fewer triggers than we originally anticipated.
There are proven ways to combat procrastination so that it doesn’t get in the way of accomplishing your most important tasks.
The next time you resist a task, consider whether it sets off any of the procrastination triggers, work within your resistance level, force yourself to get started on it, list the costs of putting the task off, or disconnect from the internet.

The orginal article.

Summary of “We have a pretty good idea of when humans will go extinct”

Several decades ago, Princeton’s J. Richard Gott got the idea of applying the principle to our position in time.
If his visit took place at the very beginning of that middle portion of the Wall’s existence, Gott reasoned, that eight years would represent exactly one quarter of the way into its history.
In the case of Gott’s visit to the Berlin Wall, to achieve 95 percent confidence on his prediction he’d have to say the Wall’s future life span was somewhere between 0.2 and 320 years, instead of the 2.66 to 24 years predicted at the 50 percent accuracy threshold.
Assuming that you and I are not so special as to be born at either the dawn of a very long-lasting human civilization or the twilight years of a short-lived one, we can apply Gott’s 95 percent confidence formula to arrive at an estimate of when the human race will go extinct: between 5,100 and 7.8 million years from now.
Mammalian species typically last around 1 million years before going extinct.
As Gott points out, our Neanderthal ancestors were around for only 300,000 years, while Homo erectus survived for about 1.6 million.
Gott has put his Copernican formula to the test in a number of different ways over the years, with some surprising results.
There’s not much reason to suspect that we’ll remain one forever: Using the Copernican formula several years ago, Gott estimated that “If our location within the history of human space travel is not special, there is a 50 percent chance that we are in the last half now and that its future duration is less than 48 years.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘TRL’ First Episode Recap: Where Does the Show Go Without Music Videos?”

On a day where the music world – really, the world entire – was reeling from the unspeakable tragedy that left over 50 dead and over 500 injured at the Route 91 Harvest Festival in Las Vegas, music fans were asked to divert their attentions to a resurrection of the music video program that set new standards for frivolity in pop music two decades earlier.
With everyone’s eyes on the horrors in Las Vegas, a revelation about Nu-TRL that might’ve started a torrential backlash before the show even started did go largely unnoticed: EW reported that in addition to certain other notable differences from the original series, the TRL reboot would pivot away from the first show’s video-countdown format.
As ironic as it may be to have a show whose name stands for “Total Request Live” do away with any notion of requests, commenting on that irony is a largely joyless enterprise, considering its parent channel, whose name stands for “Music Television,” now openly acknowledges that music is no longer its particular focus.
What was staggering about Monday’s TRL re-premiere was not just that it lacked music videos, but that it didn’t even acknowledge their absence: No explanation was given as to the show’s new format, and if you weren’t old enough to have seen the show a decade-plus ago, you might assume it was always just a combination of studio chatter, fan engagement and live performance.
To be fair, this would’ve been an impossible situation for any show to properly address in its first episode, especially with a roster of rookie hosts and an untested, unproven new format.
Given the tone-deafness of original show runner Albert Lewittin’s response to questioning about whether or not he would consider having President Trump as a show guest, it’s hardly surprising that wokeness isn’t a strength of the early show – though in truth, social conscience is one of the few things MTV has actually excelled at with their event programming the past year, so it might’ve been wise for the show to lean into that with their TRL reboot.
The show has a very long way to go in re-establishing itself at the core of American pop culture.
Making music videos essential again would’ve been the simplest, if not necessarily the easiest, path towards doing that – but if it hopes to do so as an all-things-to-all-kids entertainment show, it needs to get a lot better at being entertaining, and finding exactly what its lane is.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Technology is destroying the most important asset in your life”

“Money isn’t the most important thing in the world. Your time is.”
The most important asset in your life isn’t time, but attention.
You can spend 80 years of a life with as much free time as you want and still not get out of it as much as someone who only lived for 40 years but managed to appropriately direct attention to the things that mattered to them.
Although time is indeed limited, with attention, it can be diluted to expand beyond what most other people get out of the same quantity.
Naturally, these devices and technologies are an important part of modern life, but in order for them to be a net positive force in your life, you have to set boundaries.
Attention has the power to make you happier by helping you appreciate the little things that are easily neglected in day to day life.
Attention can guide you to a fulfilled life by forcing focus onto the things that really matter to you, rather than the things that steal you away.
If you protect and cultivate your attention, there is almost nothing stopping you from living the life you want, because that’s where it all begins.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How the Original ‘TRL’ Conquered Teen Culture”

The show’s ratings-which per Nielsen peaked in 1999, with almost 800,000 viewers a day- gradually declined until the show closed up shop in November 2008 with an epic, boldface-name-saturated finale.
In the public imagination, the show is synonymous with teen stars and boy bands, especially the great Backstreet Boys vs. ‘NSync war that raged in the late ’90s and early 2000s, giving America perhaps its closest modern-day equivalent to Beatlemania.
The show premiered at a low point for the channel and youth culture alike.
Multiple TRL vets fondly recall Em’s 2002 appearance on the show, just as 8 Mile premiered and made him a movie star, too.
“Literally, you could see the tears in his eyes. It really hit him, I think-it was chilling to see Times Square like that, and just to see that he wasn’t taking it for granted. That he really, really appreciated that moment.” As a major artist, you could turn your nose up at the show and the teen-pop hegemony it often stood for.
Healy says he knew TRL had become a pop phenomenon when the likes of Tom Cruise or Will Smith showed up, and more traditional NYC publicity-tour stops-from The Today Show to Conan to Letterman-started to see the show as legitimate competition, booking-wise.
Like every major TV show, TRL struggled to adapt its tone to the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, but here, too, their target audience’s sensibilities came first.
“Music is so fragmented now, there’s no one central hub to go to be like, ‘Oh, this is cool, this is cool.’ I think that that’s what’s missing from pop culture and music today: There’s not that one place where we can all go to, to gather round and root for your boy bands, or your rock bands, pop stars, things like that.” That’s a tall order for anyone in 2017, but it makes sense to bet on a show that already did it once.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Facebook’s VP of Product on Mastering Focus and Intentional Work”

As Vice President of Product at Facebook, this emphasis on intentional work has helped her team of more than 400 product managers and engineers develop countless innovative products for News Feed across video, news and advertising, including Facebook Live.
By cutting out anything nonessential she was able to focus on the most strategic priorities, not only for the product team, but for herself.
Simo asks these questions during weekly product reviews, when teams come in to present their plans.
To maintain collective focus and maximize the odds of successful product development, her Facebook product team is now organized and mobilized by the intention of their work, instead of the initial name of or label on a specific project or even the proposed product vision.
“One of the main things that team was working on was a Q&A product that helped celebrities respond to fans via text in comments. But in talking with actual celebrities, the team realized most of them found it more fun and efficient to respond with video. That became the impetus behind Live.”.
“Had the team been defined by its product, calling themselves ‘the Q&A team,’ they probably would have been much less open to shifting toward the much better solution: live video,” Simo says.
All the data Simo and her team were gathering pointed to Live as a critical product – the most social form of video they could put out into the world.
What to say when someone else can handle it: “This week, I need to focus all my time on X, but if you need an urgent answer, you can reach out to my team lead, Z, who is focused on that issue.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “8-hour workday may be 5 hours too long, research suggests”

The average worker spends most of the eight-hour workday doing many other things beside work, including eating, socializing, or reading the news.
Over the course of an eight-hour workday, the average employee works for about three hours – two hours and 53 minutes, to be more precise.
A study of UK office workers suggests the three-hour workday might be more sensible.
People can’t sustain hard work for more than a few hours, psychologists have found.
Research suggests the smarter change may actually be to work five, six-hour days.
In Sweden, a government study that ran between January 2015 and January 2017 selected roughly 80 retirement-home workers in Gothenburg to work that exact schedule.
At the end of the study, people said they were happier, less stressed, and enjoyed work more.
“Employers may actually be getting much more out of their employees,” he said, “If they only work 50 or 75 percent of the current work hours.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is This the End of the Kobe Generation in L.A?”

In L.A., battle lines were drawn thusly: Kobe was the living embodiment of hard work and dedication, a player whose ease of aesthetic is fortified by his fanatical mastery of the game’s fundamentals and a legendary gluttony for punishment; LeBron is a player spoiled by all his god-given talents, a player whose greatness was bestowed upon him, not seized for himself- all that, and he’s a fucking crybaby.
Around the time Chan ran his first marathon, Kobe, who was only about 22 at the time, began experiencing severe knee tendinitis.
There has been plenty of debate over whether he was the best NBA star of my generation, but it seems undeniable to me that Kobe was the most important.
In 1996, the Lakers traded Divac for the draft rights to Kobe Bryant.
Ball told Kobe he could, but based on how the exchange was depicted by Bleacher Report’s Kevin Ding, Kobe’s vision of the game didn’t correlate with Lonzo’s.
Of the 12 players on Team USA’s 2017 U19 men’s junior national team, only one listed Kobe as his favorite player of all time.
Of the 35 invitees that had a favorite player of all time listed in their team bio, seven chose Kobe.
Kyrie Irving has distilled it all into a near-perfect replica of the Kobe Bryant arc-everything from spouting out obtuse notions of greatness to breaking from the league’s most dominant player in an effort to self-actualize his potential.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Are You Using Social Media or Being Used By It?”

If you, like many people, use social media and generally agree that it’s an important technology, try the following experiment.
Take out a piece of paper and list your most important uses for these services – the activities that social media is well-suited to provide and that unambiguously enrich your life.
The social media industrial complex* likes to point to lists like these to justify its importance.
The average American adult social media user spends two hours per day on these services, with almost half this time dedicated to Facebook products alone.
To be more concrete, I claim that most users could probably reap 95% of the value they get out of social media by signing in twice a week, on a desktop or laptop, to catch up on the latest photos, or check their organization’s group, or to browse the most recent chatter relevant to a movement they care about.
Social media companies cannot reach multi-billion dollar valuations, or return consistent stock growth to their investors, based on controlled use.
The “Like” button? This was added to inject more intermittent reinforcement into the social media browsing experience – significantly increasing the amount of times people check their accounts.
Still use social media, if you must: but on a schedule; just a handful of times a week; preferably on a desktop to laptop, which tames the most devastatingly effective psychological exploitations baked into the phone apps.

The orginal article.

Summary of “8-hour workday may be 5 hours too long, research suggests”

The average worker spends most of the eight-hour workday doing many other things beside work, including eating, socializing, or reading the news.
Over the course of an eight-hour workday, the average employee works for about three hours – two hours and 53 minutes, to be more precise.
A study of UK office workers suggests the three-hour workday might be more sensible.
People can’t sustain hard work for more than a few hours, psychologists have found.
Research suggests the smarter change may actually be to work five, six-hour days.
In Sweden, a government study that ran between January 2015 and January 2017 selected roughly 80 retirement-home workers in Gothenburg to work that exact schedule.
At the end of the study, people said they were happier, less stressed, and enjoyed work more.
“Employers may actually be getting much more out of their employees,” he said, “If they only work 50 or 75 percent of the current work hours.”

The orginal article.