Summary of “How Would You Do in Supermax? The Answer May Lie with Imagination and Grit”

Sitting across from Perez, you wonder how he feels in this space, a tiny, harshly lit conference room at the Urban Justice Center on Wall Street in Manhattan.
A prisoner in supermax can use mental imagery to create the space and time that confinement strips away.
“I used to lie in bed with my eyes closed,” says Perez, “Thinking about my past, thinking about my future, planning for the future. Some of it was based on reality, and the other-borderline fantasy.” He tapped into a tunnel-like experience, creating a personal space for himself inside the tiny physical space of his cell.
Over time, he got more intentional about how he was using his time in his “Mental workspace,” as Schlegel refers to the overlapping networks that allow intentional imagination to take place.
Isolation naturally encourages the generation of mental imagery because imagination and perception occur along parallel neural pathways and are constantly competing for attention.
For this article, Perez and Jewell took an online test through the University of Pennsylvania’s Grit Lab that measured their grit on a scale from 1 to 5.
Jewell agrees that grit may have played a role in his anomalous supermax experience, and says that his upbringing may have made him “Grittier than his counterparts.” For his part, Perez says that the experience of confinement has made him even grittier.
Grit and imagination got him through and helped make him who he is today.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Case for the 6-Hour Workday”

The internet fundamentally changed the way we live, work, and play, and the nature of work itself has transitioned in large part from algorithmic tasks to heuristic ones that require critical thinking, problem-solving, and creativity.
Jason Fried, co-founder of Basecamp and author of It Doesn’t Have to Be Crazy at Work, said on my podcast, Future Squared, that for creative jobs such as programming and writing, people need time to truly think about the work that they’re doing.
“If you asked them when the last time they had a chance to really think at work was, most people would tell you they haven’t had a chance to think in quite a long time, which is really unfortunate.”
“People waste a lot of time at work,” according to Grant.
Cal Newport, best-selling author of Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World, echoes Grant’s sentiments, saying that “Three to four hours of continuous, undisturbed deep work each day is all it takes to see a transformational change in our productivity and our lives.”
The team maintained, and in some cases increased, its quantity and quality of work, with people reporting an improved mental state, and that they had more time for rest, family, friends, and other endeavors.
Block out time in your calendar, work on one thing at a time, do the hardest thing first, try listening to binaural beats or use the Pomodoro technique, a time management method that uses a timer to break work down into intervals, traditionally 25 minutes in length, separated by short breaks.
Organizations are spending big money on digital transformation, but they could reap an immediate, and far more cost-effective transformational benefit just by changing the way they work, instead of what they use to work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I pay my kids to get dressed, do homework and more. It’s the best decision I ever made.”

“Please get dressed – we have to leave in five minutes,” I pleaded for the 20th time, my patience waning.
All three of us have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and we struggle with time management and executive functioning.
To correct a specific bad behavior, Beurkens recommends rewarding positive behavior in 15-minute intervals – they’ll receive a check mark for each block of time they behave well.
“First,” he said, “You did the damage with the word ‘didn’t.’ Next time, ask her, ‘What is that in your hand? How does it work? Can you show me?’ Ask questions to avoid saying she didn’t brush her hair. Every time she comes up with the right answer, you have an opportunity to say, ‘Great, that’s perfect.’ You set her up for three to four positives in a matter of seconds.”
My home is less chaotic and more peaceful this year, and my kids are getting to school on time.
Several of the experts I interviewed suggested I break it down further and reward them for each task completed within a certain time frame, even if they don’t finish all of them on time.
If my daughter requests extra time to complete her homework but she’s focused the entire time, she can still receive her reward.
Rewards can be anything – toys, stickers, screen time, special privileges or money.

The orginal article.

Summary of “My life with ‘Super Smash Bros.'”

If gamers must insist on being taken seriously, their arguments dissolve when talking about Super Smash Bros.
The original Super Smash Bros., released in 1999 for the Nintendo 64, featured 12 playable characters; Ultimate, released last Friday for the Nintendo Switch, and the fifth game in the series, features 76 for now.
Franchise has remained the most prominent game throughout my life.
Unlike more sprightly video game protagonists, Arthur moves sluggishly, forcing you to appreciate the game’s thousands of interlocking ambient details.
In the same way one buys new books even though they have a stack of unfinished ones on the nightstand, I’m sure to distract myself with other games – for example, Super Smash Bros.
Exploring the massive fictional world of a game like Red Dead Redemption 2 can be fun, in a sense, but many of these labyrinthine games, several of which are released every year, lack the narrative propulsion required to keep going instead of meandering and crapping out.
The same randomly generated, repeatable element fuels the success of online games like Call of Duty and Fortnite, but unlike those Smash Bros.
Though it’s fundamentally a kid’s game – again, Mega Man vs. Pikachu – these inherent traits make it an ideal fit for the unpredictable schedule and winnowing time slots of adult life, as well as a reassuring presence considered how wildly unforgiving some newer games can feel to those who aren’t willing to log the dozens of hours required to learn the mechanics.

The orginal article.

Summary of “3 Ways to Better Understand Your Emotions”

Dealing effectively with emotions is a key leadership skill.
Naming our emotions – what psychologists call labeling – is an important first step in dealing with them effectively.
Why didn’t the project work? And what’s going to become of her job now? All of these emotions feed into her anger, but they are also separate feelings that she should identify and address.
Like them, we need a more nuanced vocabulary for emotions, not just for the sake of being more precise, but because incorrectly diagnosing our emotions makes us respond incorrectly.
You might be surprised at the breadth of your emotions – or that you’ve unearthed a deeper emotion buried beneath the more obvious one.
These experiments also revealed that over time those who wrote about their feelings began to develop insights into what those feelings meant, using phrases such as “I have learned,” “It struck me that,” “The reason that,” “I now realize,” and “I understand.” The process of writing allowed them to gain a new perspective on their emotions and to understand them and their implications more clearly.
You can also use these three approaches-broadening your vocabulary, noting the intensity of an emotion, and writing it out-when trying to better understand another person’s emotions.
Once you understand what you are feeling, then you can better address and learn from those more accurately described emotions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Neurons That Tell Time”

In a video call, May-Britt Moser explained how the L.E.C. network might do the same for the arrangement of events in time.
“Time cells” identified by researchers at Boston University, in 2011, seem to mark the ticks of a neural “Clock” as seconds elapse; in October, biologists at Northwestern University announced that they had found a set of neurons in the medial entorhinal cortex that “Turn on like a clock when an animal is waiting.” Tsao’s analysis, too, uncovered a few L.E.C. neurons that display timer-like firing patterns.
Speaking with Buzsáki, I found myself wondering what my brain was actually sensing when I seem to feel time flowing, second by second, minute by minute.
“Of course time is change,” Edvard Moser agreed.
The Trondheim group believes that the L.E.C.’s temporal signal is distributed across thousands of neurons, which express time on scales ranging from tens of seconds to more than an hour.
These sorts of investigations could help establish whether other areas of the brain actually rely on the “Timestamps” generated by the L.E.C. In many ways new findings in the neuroscience of time only underscore how little we know about time more broadly.
Do systems in the brain keep “Clock” time, “Interval” time, or some other kind of time? How does their activity contribute to our subjective “Sense of time,” if at all? How does that sense of time relate to the “Absolute time” of the material universe? To sort out what’s known about some of these questions, Buzsáki and May-Britt Moser are organizing a small conference in Costa Rica, where neuroscientists, physicists, philosophers, and linguists will discuss time and the brain.
For now, one lesson we can draw from investigations of neurobiological time applies to science more generally: progress, as it arrives, can yield mystery, too.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Prioritize Your Work When Your Manager Doesn’t”

Prioritizing work can be frustrating, especially if you work for a hands-off manager or a company that doesn’t give you clear goals.
In a world where conflicting and unclear priorities are the norm, how can you learn to prioritize your own work and still feel satisfaction from a job well done?
What is my highest contribution? When we reflect on contribution, we consider both the organization’s needs and how we uniquely bring to bear strengths, experience, and capabilities.
What am I passionate about? Motivation and energy fuel action, so when setting priorities, get clear on what brings you inspiration in your work today.
Quadrant I: Prioritize those areas of your job that hit this sweet-spot intersection of bringing your highest value-add and making an impact that you feel excited about.
Quadrant III: Elevate those tasks that give you a lot of energy but that others don’t see as the best use of your time.
The irony is, as we progress in our careers, things that were once in quadrant I now belong in quadrant IV. If people still come to you for these tasks, redirect them graciously by saying something like, “It’s so great to see you. I know how important this is. I’ve asked Kate on my team to take on those issues, and she’ll be able to get you a more direct and speedy answer.”
Look back on your calendar over the last month to see how much time you allocated across the four quadrants.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Best Video Games of 2018”

In recent years, members of the alt-right have, in blog posts and in YouTube videos, courted young men who share an interest in video games.
Last month, a YouTube user uploaded a clip from the recent blockbuster video game Red Dead Redemption 2, a cowboy playpen set in the late-nineteenth-century American Southwest.
The cultural problems around video games, of course, inhere not just in their young players but in their creators.
There remains a woeful lack of diversity among those who design video games, and, in the industry at large, among those who decide what kinds of games are made in the first place.
While 2018 was hardly a vintage year for video games, there were releases that nevertheless excited, stimulated, and challenged their audiences to think for themselves.
It’s a notable leap forward for the open-world video game, but its success may have come at the cost of those who created it.
There is pleasure to be had, of course, in driving a glittering array of supercars within a video game, where insurance premiums are yet to be found.
Monster hunting has been a theme in video games since Pokémon challenged us to catch ’em all.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stop Doing Low-Value Work”

In the past, time management experts would recommend that you divide up your work into A tasks, B tasks, and C tasks.
Although the jobs went away, much of the work didn’t.
No matter the job, everyone ended up with a lot more work.
It’s actually a matter of professional life or death to get rid of your low-value work – tasks that mean little or nothing to customers or colleagues.
Ask for help reducing your low-value work from your company’s productivity unit or information technology gurus.
Every week, block off the same time for yourself at work.
Use the time to figure out how to get rid of your low-value work.
It may take a while before people learn not to interrupt you during that time, but if you are politely persistent, it will work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to balance full-time work with creative projects”

So think about it: What type of work or situations might you seek out that wouldn’t leave you in a bad mood after working? By spending some time brainstorming about the job that could be a nice complement to your personality and side projects, you’ll put yourself in a better position to find the right type of gig.
Finding the right gig to nicely balance with your personality and creative work isn’t going to happen overnight.
Would you like a job that makes you lots of money? Expands your network? Gets you working with your hands? Trust your brain and your body-you’ll thank yourself when you’ve landed the right job that’s actually helping you get what you want, and are also able to have time and energy to produce creative work you’re proud of.
If you choose to really focus on creative work while continuing to have a full-time day job, chances are you’ll be sacrificing time for friends, family, partners, and all the other ways you could be spending your days.
“Done” is better than “Perfect.” Watching highly creative friends fail to finish a promising project always makes me sad. Regardless of whether or not you ever plan to publish the work, it’s important to make every effort to see your work through.
The environment you make your work in impacts the quality and quantity of your work.
You can chip away at creative work and over time, it will add up.
Finding balance between full-time and creative work is a process.

The orginal article.