Summary of “To the Driver Who Hit Me and Ran”

You fractured vertebrae in my neck and back and damaged my spinal cord, paralyzing my left leg and compromising my bladder and bowel function.
Just a few months prior, a distracted driver had hit Gillach with her car while he was riding his bike near his home in Arvada, Colorado.
“They put my 58-year-old body back together, and they will put your body back together,” he said to me.
The first person charged with putting me back together was Dr. Laughlin McCollester, attending emergency physician at the Boulder Community Health emergency department.
It’s the work that was needed to repair my back that now haunts me.
The violent impact with your vehicle did so much damage to my spine that it required two separate operations-one from the back to fuse it and another from the front to remove fragments of bone and to insert metal cages.
I’m barely able to reach my left arm above my head. And there’s nerve pain that constantly sparkles, radiates, pulses, and tingles up and down my paralyzed left leg.
I know it’s highly unlikely that you hit me with your car, but I also know that it’s likely you exhibit dangerous behaviors when driving-every driver does from time to time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Coronavirus Disproportionately Affects Boomers. Here’s How Millennials Can Help Them.”

There are the people who are taking the threat of the spread of COVID-19 seriously, and are doing their best to prepare and socially distance themselves from others, regardless of their current health or vulnerability.
Add in inconsistent messaging from the government and differing “Recommendations” from state to state, and it’s easy to understand why people have developed such disparate attitudes about how to proceed in their daily lives.
Here’s what is clear: Even though many people who contract the coronavirus will only experience flulike symptoms, 15% to 20% will develop serious, life-threatening symptoms that demand hospitalization.
Too, has the number of people living over the age of 85, which has grown from 2.2 million to 6.3 million.
Many boomers, even retired ones, think of those people as old and at risk – not themselves.
Another option is appealing to their sense of care and compassion for those people they consider “Old” – especially if they’re related to them.
Another woman named Jaime told me she’d had little trouble convincing her parents to take preventative measures, but her 88-year old grandparents were incredibly resistant: They’re volunteering, hugging people at church, and keeping themselves as busy as possible.
“I’ve found the best strategy is telling my grandparents they would be protecting people like me – which has at least convinced them to stop hugging literally everyone during the passing of the peace at church. They are more worried about others than their own health.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “How a Stroke Turned a 63-Year-Old Into a Rap Legend”

Undeterred, Hershfield put aside his Tchaikovsky records and listened to NWA and Run-DMC. He played rap music in the bath, Michiko told me.
One evening in October 1999, Hershfield heard that KRS-One was speaking about rap history at an event for hip-hoppers in Hollywood, and decided to swing by.
A few days later, the rap icon arrived at Hershfield’s office.
He asked Hershfield whether he’d like to be part of an experiment, and offered him rap lessons.
In early 2000, Hershfield attended a talk about violence and rap music at the California State University at Los Angeles.
“They were so shocked. Let’s just say none of his friends showed up at open-mic night.” By choosing rap nights instead of night shifts, Hershfield soon fell into another financial crisis.
Though he never recorded an album with KRS-One, Hershfield owed his underground rap career to the Blastmaster.
“I can’t clearly tell you whether [rap] helped him,” said Michiko, “But I can tell you he was happy when he was doing rap music.” Hershfield represented Project Blowed until ill health forced him to quit both music and medicine.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The End of Egyptian Cotton”

Grown along the Nile, cotton thrived in Egypt, and Ali steadily turned the country into a cotton plantation.
Lawrence Durrell, in “The Alexandria Quartet,” describes the “Cotton kings” who lived in early-twentieth-century Alexandria, “The Hellenistic capital of the bankers and cotton-visionaries.” The Alexandria Cotton Exporters Association is adjacent to the Cecil Hotel-a storied Moorish guest house built in 1929, where Durrell’s characters gather to gossip and broker their affairs with the “Detachment of Alexandrian brokers planning a cotton merger.” Like the hotel, the association has an unobstructed view of Alexandria’s Eastern Harbor, lined with Venetian-style buildings that curve up to the Citadel of Qaitbay.
Two years before the Egyptian monarchy was forced out, in 1952, only two of the thirty-five registered cotton brokers at the Alexandria stock exchange were Egyptian.
Egyptian cotton continues to be picked by hand, to protect the cotton clumps from injury.
“I’ve heard stories of how, in the middle of the night, all of a sudden, bales get switched and high-end cotton bales get mixed with Upland,” a cheaper type of cotton derisively known as “Hairy.” Spinners and weavers can mix different types of cotton together.
“All this came from Welspun.” No one is certain how Welspun was exposed, but a simple look at statistics of Egyptian cotton production, made available by the Alexandria Cotton Exporters Association, would have shown that something was afoot.
“We had to import. Any spinner here would tell you, ‘If I have the option to work Egyptian cotton or Pima, I would definitely pick Egyptian. It’s easier to work. It’s cheaper.'” Yet, according to a U.S.D.A. report, an Egyptian yarn producer told agency staffers that, “Even with the high prices of imported Pima cotton, his yarn importers in Europe are requesting yarn produced from Pima cotton and are willing to pay the extra cost due to its high quality compared to yarn produced from the inconsistent quality of Egyptian extra-long staple cotton.”
“The Supima boys are doing backflips and pirouettes on their desks right now,” Ron Lawson, a cotton broker, told Reuters, soon after the Welspun scandal, referring to an association that provides a trademark indicating that cotton products are made with American Pima cotton.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What It’s Like to Try to Get Treatment for the Coronavirus in China”

On the morning of January 18th, a seventy-nine-year-old resident of the central Chinese city of Wuhan, whom I’ll call Li, eagerly awaited the arrival of his daughter and her family, who were travelling from Shanghai to join him for the most important holiday on the Chinese calendar: the Lunar New Year.
Around 5 P.M., he arrived with his daughter at the Wuhan Central hospital, where he waited five hours to see a doctor, who told him that he needed a CT scan of his lungs, for which there was a four-hour wait.
The dispatcher told her that, without confirmation of a diagnosis from a receiving hospital, he could not help her.
Finally, an ambulance was sent, but Li was turned away from a couple of hospitals, which were already full.
Finally, at the fourth hospital the family tried, Li’s daughter and her husband, despondent and frustrated, started shouting in the E.R. waiting room.
Phoenix Weekly also reported on a thirty-six-year-old Wuhan resident who said that he had been refused by six hospitals in two weeks while battling symptoms of the coronavirus.
The Wuhan coronavirus belongs to the same family as severe acute respiratory syndrome, or SARS, which broke out in the southern Chinese province of Guangdong, in November, 2002, and spread, through infected travellers, to twenty-six countries, killing almost eight hundred people around the world.
The government plans to erect within weeks two emergency hospital facilities to accommodate thousands of patients.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Atavist Magazine”

Back in 2014, after she learned about the lecture on the galleon, La Follette called Scott Williams, the maritime archaeologist who would be delivering the talk.
Williams emailed La Follette a 2011 paper in which he and other researchers revealed that the galleon that crashed on the Oregon coast was very likely the Santo Cristo de Burgos.
La Follette could finally tell me how her story of the galleon ended, where it all went.
La Follette had decided to work with Douglas Deur, the anthropologist, and a few other galleon obsessives to write several articles for the Oregon Historical Quarterly.
Fox agreed to take it all, intrigued not only by the volume of her work but also by its connections to La Follette’s environmental activism in Oregon.
I’d noticed before that when La Follette talked about the galleon, she mentioned the sensory experience of what it must have been like on board the Santo Cristo-how it smelled, what the men ate.
For all her life, even before the galleon business, poetry to La Follette was like prayer or meditation or feeding herself regular meals.
Two months after the OHQ hit local shelves, La Follette began work on her epic poem about the galleon.

The orginal article.

Summary of “N. K. Jemisin’s Dream Worlds”

In a different writer’s hands, the use of the second person might have registered as a gimmick, but Jemisin made the device integral to the plot, and deployed it with personality-a voice with quirks and, occasionally, a sense of immediacy.
The Times called them “Extraordinary.” John Scalzi, the former president of the Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America, heralded Jemisin as “Arguably the most important speculative writer of her generation.”
Jemisin pointed to a photo of her father, Noah, as a young man-thin, confident, smiling-and spoke about his grandmother, a woman people called Muh Dear: “She basically made her living doing fortunes-magic, for lack of a better term.” In a story that Jemisin included in “How Long ’til Black Future Month?,” she envisioned Muh Dear as a shaman named Emmaline, facing down a malevolent fairy, the White Lady, who wants to take away her daughter.
Black writers have been engaged in speculative fiction since at least the nineteenth century, but when Jemisin first immersed herself in the genre their work was either difficult to locate or difficult to recognize.
Jemisin considered applying to the Clarion writers’ workshop, which specializes in science fiction and fantasy; luminaries in the genre teach there.
Online, Jemisin is an active, quick-witted commentator, lacing her posts-about politics or about the writing life-with zingers and tart observations.
Jemisin began to abbreviate her name at the start of her writing career, fearing that an association with sci-fi would interfere with her professional work.
For the first time, Jemisin could devote herself fully to writing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Disease of Deceit”

Newly arrived to Brooklyn, Chaya met Laura through mutual friends, and though a newcomer to the city, Chaya was certainly not an unknown quantity.
Like me, Jeremy couldn’t recall a time when he didn’t think of Chaya as sick in some way.
Chaya would talk about wanting to get a dog often, but she felt that she couldn’t care for one.
Nearly five years after first meeting Chaya, my friend Laura texted me a screenshot of a conversation she had with Samantha, Chaya’s younger sister, on Facebook.
Though the chat was conducted through Chaya’s own Facebook account, we had all been under the impression that her sister – not Chaya – was in control of her digital life since her health had taken a turn for the terminal.
Along with the screenshot from the private chat, Laura texted, “This is the third or fourth time either Chaya or her sister has specifically mentioned making this all up I don’t know what’s going on, but I wish I could go over there and talk to Samantha and Chaya in person if only to get a better understanding and try to help”.
Chaya had been telling one truth and one lie about her job: specifically, that she had worked – and still did – in the public sector, and that she was making six figures, outearning much of our friend group.
Chaya understood the type of person Laura is -kind, compassionate, patient – and that she would prioritize Chaya’s well-being ahead of all other considerations.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Caused the Opioid Epidemic?”

The triplicate paper, in essence, makes it look like the opioid epidemic was mostly the fault of Big Pharma’s marketing, not the result of an economic shock.
To get the worst drug overdose epidemic in U.S. history, he says, “You need a huge rise in opioid access, in a way that misuse is easy, but you also need demand to misuse the product.”
The next step will be for researchers to see how the marketing of opioids interacted with economic conditions to increase the likelihood that a given place would succumb to addiction.
In the meantime, researchers working on the ground say opioid addiction looks like the result of a perfect storm of poverty, trauma, availability, and pain.
OxyContin was just a short doctor’s visit away-in one case, a doctor would simply refill opioid prescriptions by phone.
Her interviewees had easy access to opioids, yes, but they also felt betrayed by the world.
In one of their studies, the Princeton economists Anne Case and Angus Deaton, who coined the “Deaths of despair” hypothesis, noted that opioid overdoses, suicides, and alcohol abuse are the results of “Cumulative distress,” or the overall “Failure of life to turn out as expected.”
Silva told me that the opioid epidemic had made some of her interviewees even more resentful, because they saw their neighbors as too weak to pull themselves out of addiction.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Shadow Commander”

If Suleimani couldn’t have the Basij, he settled for the next best thing: Brigadier General Hossein Hamedani, the Basij’s former deputy commander.
Despite all of Suleimani’s rough work, his image among Iran’s faithful is that of an irreproachable war hero-a decorated veteran of the Iran-Iraq War, in which he became a division commander while still in his twenties.
The Supreme Leader, who usually reserves his highest praise for fallen soldiers, has referred to Suleimani as “a living martyr of the revolution.” Suleimani is a hard-line supporter of Iran’s authoritarian system.
In a brief memoir, Suleimani wrote of leaving home with a young relative named Ahmad Suleimani, who was in a similar situation.
On at least one occasion, Suleimani himself was wounded.
During the Iraq War, Crocker sometimes dealt with Suleimani indirectly, through Iraqi leaders who shuttled in and out of Tehran.
“Suleimani is in a tearing rage. He feels compromised.” The negotiator told Crocker that, at great political risk, Suleimani had been contemplating a complete reĆ«valuation of the United States, saying, “Maybe it’s time to rethink our relationship with the Americans.” The Axis of Evil speech brought the meetings to an end.
“Dear General Petraeus,” the text read, “You should know that I, Qassem Suleimani, control the policy for Iran with respect to Iraq, Lebanon, Gaza and Afghanistan. And indeed, the ambassador in Baghdad is a Quds Force member. The individual who’s going to replace him is a Quds Force member.” After the five American soldiers were killed in Karbala, Suleimani sent a message to the American Ambassador.

The orginal article.