Summary of “The Day Treva Throneberry Disappeared”

Then there was that day when Treva’s young niece J’Lisha, who was staying at the Throneberry home, told people that Treva had shaken her awake the previous night and whispered that a man was outside their room with a gun-which turned out to be not true at all.
1985.It didn’t take long for the rumor to spread through town that Treva Throneberry had last been seen down at the police station, where she had given a statement claiming that her daddy, holding a gun in his hand, had raped her.
In court Carl and Patsy insisted that Treva had made up the entire story, and their attorney went so far as to demand that Treva be given a lie-detector test.
“Honey, you’ll be Treva Throneberry until the day you die,” Patsy said in a wobbly voice.
Why? Why had Treva Throneberry used at least eighteen teenage aliases since the early nineties, and why had she spun such gruesomely outlandish tales? Was she nothing more than a con artist, pretending to be a downtrodden teenager to receive free foster care and a free education? Was she afflicted with what doctors call psychiatric Munchausen syndrome, in which she intentionally feigned intense emotional distress to receive extra attention?
Although Clark County senior deputy prosecutor Michael Kinnie said that Treva needed to be treated as a common criminal-“What we are dealing with here is a woman who knows exactly what she’s doing,” he said-a writer for the Vancouver newspaper suggested that Treva’s behavior “Doesn’t suggest maliciousness so much as misery.” As for Kinnie’s contention that Treva was dangerous-after all, a Vancouver security guard went to jail because of her accusation of rape-the writer reminded his readers that the security guard pleaded guilty.
After a long silence Treva said, “This Treva in these pictures. What was she like?”.
“She enjoyed church. She enjoyed tennis. She had a wooden tennis racket. She was always very appropriate, very thankful. She always apologized if she hurt my feelings. There was another long silence. Treva stared down at her notebook, her eyes blinking. Was it possible that the past was returning-that she was remembering the girl she once was?”Was Treva smart?” Treva asked.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The fall of WeWork’s Adam Neumann”

This is the global headquarters of The We Company, and I was there to meet with its CEO and cofounder Adam Neumann.
The fall of Adam Neumann has been so swift and sudden, it’s hard to grasp fully.
Through interviews with executives across different divisions and regions of the company, a complicated picture of Neumann emerges.
Last winter, WeWork led a $32 million investment in a snack company started by surfer Laird Hamilton, one of Neumann’s friends.
Neumann ruled WeWork through a tight-knit crew, which included his wife, Rebekah; his brother-in-law Chris Hill, who served as chief product officer; and vice chairman Michael Gross.
Its directors allowed Neumann to be able to borrow millions from the company.
Also under their watch, WeWork leased space in buildings in which its CEO had financial stakes, though Neumann was not involved in the negotiation of these leases.
“I, Adam Neumann, am not a seller.” In mid-July, in advance of the pending IPO, the Wall Street Journal reported that Neumann had cashed out at least $700 million in cash and loans.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stories About My Brother”

Yush became such an important figure in the development of a new type of telecom laser that Dr. Tansu told me “With absolute certainty” that the research his group submitted in 2006 and 2007, which resulted in two top conference publications, “Would not have been completed and done without Yush’s contribution.”
Yush painstakingly taught our headmaster how to pronounce a vaguely Indian-sounding middle name that Yush had made up: “VakaDakaRamaPutna.” At graduation, our headmaster unwittingly called Yush Pal VakaDakaRamaPutna Gupta to the stage, and the room boomed with laughter.
His former teaching assistant and close friend Boris Lipchin worked at SpaceX upon graduation and encouraged Yush to apply for an internship.
As an intern, Yush helped build software for the Dragon, a space capsule that delivers cargo to the International Space Station.
Susan Farrington, a former CMU administrator and so-called “College mom” to Yush, told me that when she was between jobs, Yush suspected that she might be struggling.
Yush took only one self-indulgence: He spent thousands of dollars on a procedure in Italy that, he believed, would earn him more respect.
“In November 2017, as I attempted to choose a casket and pick out what music would play at his funeral service, I learned the unsettling truth about why he had been in Italy. Though Yush had told me in August that he was going overseas to work remotely on a new start-up company, he had lied. He was there to get limb-lengthening surgery, a lengthy procedure that involves sawing through the bone, drilling a nail and screws into it, and in the months afterward, slowly, painfully pulling the broken bones apart by a few millimeters, every day for months, to add a few inches of height. Yush, who was about 5’7”, desperately wanted to be taller.
Guichet’s website acknowledges that patients like Yush, who pursue limb lengthening for purely cosmetic reasons, “Are really asking the surgeon for a solution to their psychological issue or insecurity,” and “This means that we have to carefully evaluate and coach the patient psychiatrically to ensure their informed decision will have the best possible results.” Yush passed Guichet’s evaluation, and he arranged the surgery in Italy.

The orginal article.

Summary of “When the Former Maid Stephanie Land Hired a Maid Herself”

“How much do you usually charge?” I asked, knowing I’d pay her more.
I’d already picked up the kitchen as much as I could, putting away all the dishes and clutter.
I’d grimaced at the thought of scrubbing it, even though that’s exactly what I had asked someone else to do.
As Michelle walked into the kitchen, I fumbled through the story of hurting my back, and Michelle nodded, knowingly, and told me about her herniated disks.
Michelle nodded and walked toward the front door to get more supplies.
I remembered what it was like to talk to a client in the position Michelle was in: on her knees, looking up at a person the same age or younger who has hired you to clean a huge house by yourself, and I told her so, asking her if she needed anything.
“Oh, my daughter would love to read that! She wants to be a writer,” Michelle said.
By the time I saw Michelle again to do a walk-through at my old house, it was the third day I’d been able to walk more than a few feet, and I told her so.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Murders at the Lake”

If Simons had a job at the jail, he could get close to Spence and use him to solve the lake murders.
Spence hadn’t bought his station wagon until two weeks after the murders.
The task force now gathered momentum as investigators found witnesses who told of suspicious things Spence had said the previous summer: that he thought he had killed somebody, for example, and that he had raped two girls at the lake.
“Evidence will show,” he declared, “That David Wayne Spence … not only bragged repeatedly that he was responsible for the murders but that he had details [about] how the murders were committed.” Seven jailhouse informants took the stand.
The more people Price talked to, the more she doubted the case against Washington and Williams-and wondered about the case against Spence, Deeb, and the Melendez brothers in the lake murders.
On October 16, fourteen hours before Spence was scheduled to die, Owen and Schonemann filed a 164-page writ in each court, in which they stated that in only six weeks of investigating they’d discovered “Strong indications of astonishing state misconduct” in the case against Spence for the Lake Waco murders.
A soft-spoken, patient woman who kept journals about the Lake Waco investigation, Thompson had attended Spence’s aggravated sexual abuse trial in 1983, as had Franks; it was there, she told Dannen, that Franks had unexpectedly mentioned to her a phone call he’d received the night of the murders that made him think “Something was wrong” out at the lake.
Everyone believed Feazell and Simons.” He based his first statement on what he’d read in the newspapers and heard from his jail mates; when there weren’t enough details in it for him to testify against Spence, he said, Simons took him out to Lake Waco and showed him around, casually slipping him details.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Narcotics Officer Ends His War on Drugs”

In 2013, Simmers received an unusual phone call from his 18-year-old daughter, Brooke, who was typically defensive of her independence: “I need your help, Dad.” Simmers braced himself and met her for breakfast at a Waffle House near the so-called heroin highway, an intersection of interstates that connects major drug markets up and down the East Coast.
Brooke told Simmers that she was addicted to opioid pain pills and didn’t know how to stop.
The disaster that followed made him reconsider not just his decision to lock up Brooke, but also his role as a willing combatant in the decades-long War on Drugs.
Simmers called friends in the Hagerstown police who had previously turned a blind eye to Brooke’s drug use-“Professional courtesy,” Simmers called it- and asked them to throw the book at her.
“You could just hear whispers down the hallway, ‘It’s Brooke Simmers, it’s Brooke Simmers, it’s Brooke Simmers!'” Having arrested some of the inmates himself, Sergeant Simmers was well known inside the detention center.
Simmers feared Brooke would relapse, so at night he parked his police cruiser close behind her car to prevent her from sneaking out of the house.
Hours later, Dana Simmers received a call from Brooke’s friend Alison Shumaker, who told her she had spoken to Brooke in the predawn hours.
Carefully out of sight behind the Christmas decorations in the basement, Dana Simmers, Brooke’s stepmother, preserves clothing that still carries Brooke’s scent.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Crane Wife”

In my novel there were biologists doing field research about birds and I had no idea what field research actually looked like and so the scientists in my novel draft did things like shuffle around great stacks of papers and frown.
The first thing Jeff said was, “We’ll head back to camp, but I hope you don’t mind we run by the liquor store first.” I felt more optimistic about my suitability for science.
These were small things, and I told myself it was stupid to feel disappointed by them.
You look at the things it relies on to live instead. You ask if there is enough to eat and drink.
More than once I’d said to my fiancé, How am I supposed to know you love me if you’re never affectionate or say nice things or say that you love me.
The thing is, we saw twenty pigs on the drive home that night.
There are ways to be wounded and ways to survive those wounds, but no one can survive denying their own needs.
It’s harder to tell the story of how I convinced myself I didn’t need what was necessary to survive.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Scorned Women and a Casanova Cop Caught L.A.’s ‘Dine-and-Dash Dater'”

Valdez easily identified Gonzales and his green eyes from the line-up of five Paul-a-likes, and told Cass a familiar story.
“You meet him right away.” Cass said that based on his own dating experience, he realized that Gonzales was a smooth operator.
Among the avocado crostinis and cucumber margaritas, Cass recognized the two children he had seen in photographs Gonzales had sent victims.
Cass knew the biggest challenge would be to convict Gonzales.
“The experience for women online is vastly different than for men,” explained Cass.
Cass recalled: “My partner, he told me… man, Cass is really cracking down these vendors!” But then he heard the detective make the radio call: “This is footbeat three, we have Paul Gonzales in custody… the Dine-and-Dash Dater.”
Just as Cass predicted, his suspect’s phone was full of dating trophies-photographs of hundreds of women.
At another café in Pasadena, Cass sometimes bumps into Gonzales, too.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Father, a Daughter, and the Attempt to Change the Census”

She mentioned a recent column in the Raleigh News & Observer, in which the journalist David Daley, who has written extensively about gerrymandering, was quoted as saying, “It wouldn’t surprise me at all if on a hard drive somewhere in Raleigh Tom Hofeller has another set of gifts for legislators.” In fact, Hofeller told Pinsky, she had multiple hard drives that had belonged to her father.
In May, with the Supreme Court’s decision pending, attorneys at Common Cause were going through Hofeller’s files when they found evidence that seemed to confirm what many had suspected: that adding a citizenship question to the census was a way to drive down immigrant participation-thus weakening their representation when subsequent congressional districts were drawn-and had nothing to do with enforcing the Voting Rights Act.
Common Cause also found e-mail exchanges on the hard drives between Hofeller and Christa Jones, a longtime census employee who is now chief of staff to the deputy director of the U.S. Census Bureau.
Jones e-mailed Hofeller about the census in 2010, and again in 2015, when she pointed out that the bureau was soliciting public comments, and noted, “This can also be an opportunity to mention citizenship as well.”
In the deposition, a lawyer for the defendants said, of Stephanie Hofeller, “Even a cursory review of publicly available information shows that the respondent’s relationship with her father was strained.” Hofeller remarked to me in an e-mail, “Right, nothing better than a cursory review of publicly available information to unravel the complicated dynamics of familial relationships!”.
The shelter, Moore said, then released the photographs to Hofeller’s father, and they ended up “In the hands of the sheriff’s office.” Hofeller and Moore maintain that Thomas Hofeller suggested to his daughter that, if she “Did not coöperate with the investigation into Peter,” as Moore put it, “He would use the photographs to incriminate her on the grounds of child neglect and then use the photos to challenge Stephanie’s custodial rights in family court. Stephanie did not comply, and everything that Tom threatened came true, except for Peter was never convicted.”
“The one thing my ex-husband and my father had in common was an obsession with putting me in submission, having control over me,” Hofeller said.
A few hours later, the Justice Department sent a letter to the district-court judges in Maryland and New York who have adjudicated the census case, informing them that they planned to “Discuss appropriate next steps in these proceedings.” A lawyer for the New York Immigration Coalition, one of the groups that sued the Commerce Department over the matter, said that the group will file a motion seeking sanctions against the government for their false testimony in the case, citing the evidence on Hofeller’s hard drives.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Suicide Epidemic Has Swept Across American West – Rolling Stone”

For years, a comfortable excuse for the ascending suicide rate in the rural West was tied to the crushing impact of the Great Recession.
“There was hope that ‘OK, as the economy recovers, boy, it’s going to be nice to see that suicide rate go down,’ ” says Dr. Jane Pearson, a suicide expert at the National Institute of Mental Health.
In between Sean Hannity braying at me from every AM station, I listened to Marc Maron’s WTF podcasts with Anthony Bourdain and Robin Williams, two of the more notable recent examples of the middle-aged white-male suicide epidemic.
Morton is a local reporter who had written for an influential series on suicide in the rural West for the Casper Star-Tribune earlier in the decade.
Dr. Christine Moutier, a suicide specialist for the American Federation for the Prevention of Suicide, estimates a suicide can impact the lives of 112 people, from loved ones to co-workers.
She had committed suicide two years earlier, another example of the catastrophic ripple effects of suicide.
Since then he has volunteered at Grace for 2 Brothers, a Wyoming suicide support group started by a mother who lost two sons to suicide.
Gun availability is one of the tangible causes for the rural West’s suicide rate, and Wyoming leads the nation with 73 percent of its households owning guns, while the state is third in per-capita suicide.

The orginal article.