Summary of “Climate Change Is Likely Killing Ancient Baobab Trees”

When trees are hollow, it’s usually because the wood inside them has died.
Baobab hollows were never filled; instead, these trees periodically produce new stems in the way that other trees sprout new branches.
Through this work, they also learned exactly how old these mythical trees can get.
The oldest tree that Patrut’s team studied-the Panke baobab from Zimbabwe-was more than 2,500 years old when it died in 2011.
The same can’t be said for the Platland tree, which was arguably the biggest and most visited baobab.
No one can say if baobabs have died off in this way in centuries past; these trees decay very quickly, and leave few traces behind.
“But when around 70 percent of your 1,500 to 2,000-year-old trees died within 12 years, it certainly is not normal,” says Erika Wise from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.
Although he originally suspected that Homasi was killed by a disease, none of the fallen trees have shown signs of infection, and the pattern of their deaths doesn’t fit with a spreading contagion.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Do trees sleep at night? Yes.”

Here’s one more, from the journal Frontiers in Plant Science: Birch trees “Sleep” at night.
It’s harder to do with big trees in the forest.
Why are the trees drooping? One reason could be that they’re dropping their internal water pressure, as New Scientist suggests, in response to the cessation of photosynthesis at night.
Another reason could be that the trees are actually resting: It takes energy to raise limbs up toward the light during the day.
Puttonen hopes this research will lead to a better understanding of how trees use water at different times of the days.
Since the study published in 2016, a followup report in 2017 found that different species of trees have different “Sleep” patterns.
So more research will be needed to full understand the complex patterns of tree sleep.
The tree at day is less droopy than the tree at night.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is Nature Deficit Disorder A Thing? Try Forest Bathing To Find Out”

In Japan, the country that has the highest population density in the world but also vast expanses of green forests, an ancient tradition tries to balance out the crush from urban living.
In a book hitting shelves this month, Forest Bathing: How Trees Can Help You Find Health And Happiness, Dr. Qing Li, the world’s foremost expert in forest medicine, introduces readers to the healing practice of forest bathing – and the art and science of how trees can enrich your life.
Here is the scoop: Forest bathing reduces stress, anxiety, depression, and anger.
Essential tree oils, such as phytoncides found in forest air, increase energy levels by more than 30 percent.
Aromatherapy enthusiasts know well that such tree oils conjure a general state of well-being, capturing the essence of forest bathing.
Lest urban-based readers feel discouraged, forest bathing doesn’t require huge expanses to be effective.
Who hasn’t felt an inner sense of well-being when walking along a forest trail, the sun filtering through the leaves to create a kaleidoscope of light and shadows on the ground? We take these walks to feel rejuvenated, more attuned to our bodies, to refresh our minds.
Stepping into a forest, or just into a small grove, is like pushing a life reset button, reestablishing a connection with our deepest needs.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Making a Crypto Utopia in Puerto Rico”

Josh Boles, a tall, athletic man who is another crypto expat, picked him up, and the group headed back to the Monastery.
Once a children’s museum, they plan on making it a crypto clubhouse and outreach center that will have the mission “To bring together Puerto Ricans with Puertopians.”
“We’re going to make this crypto land,” Mr. Larkin said.
Mr. Larkin has mined about $2 billion in Bitcoin and is the chief technology officer of Blockchain Industries, a publicly traded company based in Puerto Rico.Mr. Collins, an internet veteran, had raised more than $20 million from an initial coin offering for BlockV, his app store for the blockchain, whose outstanding tokens are worth about $125 million.
“When Brock said, ‘We’re moving to Puerto Rico for the taxes and to create this new town,’ I said, ‘I’m in,'” Mr. Collins said.
Welcome, Puertopians?All across San Juan, many locals are trying to figure out what to do with the crypto arrivals.
“We’re open for crypto business,” said Erika Medina-Vecchini, the chief business development officer for the Department of Economic Development and Commerce, in an interview at her office.
Ria Satz, 33, who grew up in Old San Juan and works for the Conservation Trust of Puerto Rico, disagreed.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Inside Amazon’s Giant Spheres, Where Workers Chill in a Mini Rainforest”

The next showed the same tree as it would look five years later, branches stretching high above the bridge to form a canopy, giving Amazonians the feeling of walking through a rainforest.
The glass orbs were built to let Amazon workers escape from emails, meetings, reports and deadlines to walk along stone paths beside waterfalls, let ferns from South America brush their shoulders and the moist, tropical air fill their lungs.
“Day One” is so integral to Amazon culture that it is the name of the new Seattle tower where Bezos spends most of his working hours.
So the team of plant specialists, architects and construction workers had to put their own twist on the boss’s catchphrase to create a mature, living environment: “Day One is Year Five.”.
The trickiest part of the project was transporting a 55-foot-tall tree nicknamed Rubi from a southern California farm to downtown Seattle, where it was hoisted by crane last summer and dropped through a hole in the roof.
“Accomplishing year five on day one presented a really big challenge for us,” says M. David Sadinsky, an architect with the firm NBBJ that designed the spheres.
The spheres can accommodate 800 people at a time, and Amazon will use employee badges to monitor time spent inside and make sure no one hogs the tree fort.
Besides creating a park-like setting where workers can recharge, the spheres will serve as a recruiting tool, says John Schoettler, who runs Amazon’s global real estate division and oversaw the project.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Cure Yourself of Tree Blindness”

Tree death, like tree sex, can reveal deeper truths.
Neighborhoods built in the 1960s might be lined with once-loved, now-hated Bradford pears; older ones may feature towering willow oaks with roots bulging out of undersized tree boxes.
That’s to say nothing of tree nuts, which carpet the forest floor in fall.
We’re so used to eating domesticated plants that the idea of eating wild tree parts seems strange, primitive and possibly dangerous.
This, reader, is madness! I’ll admit that I’m among the mad. Roadside tree fruit is just an occasional supplement to my diet, and I haven’t yet found the patience to leach the bitter tannins out of acorns.
When you engage with a tree, you momentarily leave the human-created world.
The elm may grow along streets and sidewalks, but there is nothing tame about that tree.
Yes, people may look curiously if you stop to study a tree.

The orginal article.

Summary of “After Oranges”

The groves there, which grew a quarter of the oranges in the world, were putting almost all of their fresh fruit into “Small, trim cans, about two inches in diameter and four inches high,” McPhee wrote, “Containing orange juice that has been boiled to high viscosity in a vacuum, separated into several component parts, reassembled, flavored, and then frozen solid.”
In a small act of defiance, he grabs a couple of oranges off a tree near his motel and juices them on a reamer bought from a hardware store’s dusty shelf.
In some parts of the world, the weather never gets cold enough to change the color; in Thailand, for example, an orange is a green fruit, and traveling Thais often blink with wonder at the sight of oranges the color of flame.
There is a pleasant sense in the book that McPhee has filtered all human knowledge of oranges to this moment, that all the stories of kings and orangeries and poets and groves that he weaves through his version of the history have arrived with him at this age of oranges in Florida.
One night, we pulled his car to the side of the road and ran into a grove with a garbage bag and filled it with oranges we picked from the trees.
If the CREC can develop such a tree, Florida oranges will survive.
Young writers-those of us still looking for a subject to open the world the way oranges did for McPhee-need books to aspire to, guides off in the distance, green fruit glowing on the high branches of a tree.
At the CREC that afternoon, I casually mentioned to several people the scene where McPhee sits down under a tree and reads everything about oranges.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Apple Park’s Tree Whisperer”

The encounter would lead to Muffly becoming the senior arborist at Apple, Inc., in charge of choosing, locating and planting the 9,000 trees that justify Apple’s choice to call its 175-acre campus a park - and in making Apple Park a leaf-and-blossom tribute to the CEO who designed it but would not live to see it built.
Muffly had come to the Cupertino office not long after receiving a cold call on his phone while working a $125 job pruning lemon trees in a Menlo Park backyard.
“That’s what I’ve been doing - planting fruit trees, oak trees,” he said.
“There was a kind of tree that I wanted to use and one that was more common,” says Muffly.
Because the trees they plant might well live a century or more, Muffly suggested they use native trees as the backbone of the ecosystem and then diversify to other oak genetics.
When Jobs presented his plan to the Cupertino City Council in June 2011, he said that Apple would add to the 3,700 existing trees for a total of 6,000.
Muffly looked at the redwoods at some abandoned Christmas tree farms up on Skyline, but the soil was too rocky to grow them to Apple’s specifications.
“So I sent all my little tree elves to help me, telling them we need big trees we can transport to the site. Next thing I know we’re finding these in two abandoned Christmas tree farms in the Mojave Desert, Yermo, and Adelanto. Who knew there were Christmas tree farms in the Mojave?” Apple actually bought the Yermo site.

The orginal article.