Summary of “12 Hiking Destinations You’ll Want to Add to Your Bucket List”

So we decided to go straight to the source and asked 12 expert hikers, adventurers, and explorers to tell us about their favorite awesome, potentially underrated hiking destinations that are worth checking out-and how to make the most of your visit.
From waterfalls in South Carolina to international trails in Myanmar and Nepal, here are some of the picturesque hiking destinations seasoned trailblazers swear by.
“Summit Lake is relatively close to Seattle and makes for a great half-day or overnight backpacking trip. From the top of the ridge above the lake, there are stunning views of Mount Rainier and the Carbon River Valley 3,000 feet below. Because [it’s] located outside the national park, it’s a great place to enjoy Mount Rainier without having to deal with fees, reservations, or permits required for many of the hiking and camping facilities at the park. I always recommend checking the Washington Trails Association website for trail reports before heading out on any trail in Washington State. The trail reports often include recent photos and current trail and road conditions.”
“For an adaptive hiker like me, it isn’t heavily trafficked by other wheelchair users, and that might be because, frankly, it’s not wheelchair accessible at all. [It’s] an amazing adventure because I’m willing to get a bit creative. I rely on a friend to piggyback me up the tough parts and strangers on the trail to carry my wheelchair and gear. I hiked Devil’s Bridge on the weekend, because I knew there would be more traffic and I anticipated that I’d need more help on this trail. It’s all about anticipating your needs and planning for them.”
“There’s so much to love about Turner Falls, but the beautiful turquoise water, the stunning waterfalls, the natural pools, and hiking areas are my personal favorites. The difficulty varies based on the trail you decide to take, but you don’t need any hiking experience to enjoy them. Many visitors also rock-climb and kayak in the area, and the park also offers ziplining for those who don’t want to hike.”
“I love this trail because it offers something for everyone. If you want to do a long backpacking trip or an ultra-run, you can do the entire trail within one to three days. If you want to hike a piece of it for a day trip, you can do that too. It circumnavigates Mount Hood, an active volcano in Oregon, and I guarantee that the views of the mountain will be some of the most beautiful you’ve ever witnessed.”
“Not only does the hike bring you to an amazing waterfall, but it also leads you to the wild and scenic Chattooga River. You really lose yourself in the wild back there. Other people aren’t usually around, and if they are, they’re probably boating. It’s moderate to strenuous at time, and I think most people should have some hiking experience under their belt before trying to take on this trail. To someone wanting to hike it, I’d suggest planning to spend a full day hanging around Chattooga-maybe even book a yurt and a rafting trip to see it from both angles.”
It’s easy to access and not many people are on it because they are hiking the popular destinations in the park.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Mysterious Heir of Extreme Travel”

Despite being a relative newcomer to the insular world of extreme travel – a competitive subculture of people who journey to some of the most obscure and treacherous corners of the globe, often at great monetary cost – Baekeland earned an astonishing amount of trust from the group in a matter of days.
As Mitsidis puts it, Baekeland’s demeanor was convincing enough to gain entry into the travel group’s inner circle.
While sources in the extreme travel world suspect Baekeland had a humble upbringing – records suggest his parent’s home is in a working-class area of Birmingham, England – Radcliffe says his friend hails “From one of the most affluent enclaves in England outside of London.”
Gazarian, who kept a casual correspondence with Baekeland, explains how the young explorer would occasionally send dispatches from his trips abroad. “He was this amazing creative writer,” says Gazarian, recalling an email Baekeland once sent him about extreme violence in South Sudan.
Despite all the hype surrounding Baekeland, one man had long harbored suspicions that the young heir was actually Jesse Gordon, the kid supposedly from Birmingham.
After he confronted Baekeland about his alleged forged identity over email, Mitsidis received a reply from Radcliffe, who claimed to be Baekeland’s personal confidant and business partner in a new venture called Atlas Travel and Expeditions LLC. Since then, Radcliffe has acted as a liaison between Baekeland and those who say he owes them money.
Many of Baekeland’s aggrieved former travel companions have filed complaints against him in several countries across Europe, although most have received little indication that law enforcement is moving quickly to bring charges.
Despite Baekeland’s removal, Bonifas is sure Atlas Travel is nothing but a conduit for more of the same.

The orginal article.

Summary of “In Norway, the Journey Is the Destination”

A friend in Oslo warned me that bad weather often cropped up unexpectedly in October, especially in the north: torrential rain storms or early snow storms that leave cars stranded on a mountain pass or by a lonely fjord.
Above Trollstigen, another project conceived along these routes is the Juvet Landscape Hotel, designed by the architects Jensen & Skodvin, and the creepy, if incredibly appropriate aesthetically, setting for the 2015 film “Ex Machina.”
The perspective created the effect that I was both inside and outside the hotel, part of the natural surroundings, both the voyeur and the inhabitant.
Around the dinner table, we traded stories about what brought us up the mountain and where we came from.
The glossy magazine reading hikers from Britain wanted a sleek hotel after rugged trails.
When I look back now, my Norwegian road trip seems like one of the most surreal and meaningful of any I have ever taken, even after many years of absorbing trips.
For the Atlantic and Trollstigen routes I drove, I flew an hour from Oslo to Kristiansund airport and rented a car from there.
Be sure to reserve well in advance for a night at the Juvet Landscape Hotel, close to the Trollstigen installation and an architectural showcase in its own right, and a boutique property, too.

The orginal article.