Summary of “Reinventing Grief in an Era of Enforced Isolation”

Father Michael, a priest my family has never met, in a city we never identified, gave my father a version of the last rites over the telephone on the night of April 4th. My father, John Collins, had received a diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia in January.
There were cancelled appointments, appointments rescheduled for Zoom; Zoom appointments cancelled, too, when my father’s new, outpatient doctors, having determined that it was too risky for him to continue commuting to Durham, acknowledged that they couldn’t very well devise a treatment plan without being able to physically examine him.
On the afternoon of April 3rd, my father entered a hospice center.
Her friend’s sister-in-law’s acquaintance finally found a willing Father Michael somewhere in California.
I called my mother at 6:19, and she told me that my father had died.
When we’d last pushed for a prognosis, in early March, my father’s doctors had guessed that he had somewhere between a year and eighteen months left to live.
Even if I made it home in time to see my father, I might transmit the coronavirus to my mother, who is seventy, or to other people.
As I spoke to my mother on the morning of the fifth, a nurse came into the room to tell her that my father’s possessions-white socks, a phone charger-would be returned to her.

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Summary of “Bowen Yang Profile: How the Saturday Night Live Star Is Making TV a Little Bit Weirder”

Dad waited in the lobby while Bowen would visit with “Some quack,” and then father and son would make the drive back up I-25-which strangely enough “Became a fun bonding experience,” Bowen says, even if the therapy itself didn’t do all that much.
“Any distortion of what they saw as a normative sexual existence was so foreign to them that they were just trying to figure out how to make sure I was going to be okay,” says Bowen.
Notably around Bowen, the first Asian American person to join the cast provided you discount things like the one-fourth-Filipino part of Rob Schneider.
As the chaos swirled around them, Bowen tracked down Gillis’s contact info, opened up some space in his heart, and texted him something along the lines of: “Hey, this is all really crazy. Let me know if you want to talk.” Bowen didn’t hear anything that night.
Bowen had even gone to Pearl River Mart in Chinatown to get a few gifts for the rest of the crew.
“He deserves some level of progression out of this,” says Bowen.
“We both deserve to not live in this moment that was unfortunate for everybody for the rest of our careers.” Folks on the internet pitted Shane against Bowen when neither of them asked for it, inadvertently showing how tricky it is for a young artist burdened with being a “First”: You might be a product of your different overlapping identities, but you don’t want to be defined by any one of them.
Chris Gayomali is an articles editor at GQ. A version of this story originally appeared in the April 2020 issue with the title “Live From New York, It’s Bowen Yang.”.

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Summary of “How to work from home even if you don’t have coronavirus”

If you’re starting to work from home or just got a remote position, you’re probably looking forward to not spending time on a frustrating commute and staying in your pajamas until noon.
I think the most important thing to remember is to find what helps you stay focused, while keeping your work separate from your home life.
It may take a bit of trial and error to figure out what area of your home is most conducive to getting work done.
Establish a routine, including non-work hours This was the hardest part for me to adapt to when I started working from home: with devices that allow bosses and clients to reach us constantly, you can end up working 24/7. Try to start work around the same time every day if you can, and schedule breaks around the same time if possible.
Know your body I splurged on a good desk chair when I first started working from home, and you may find that’s a worthwhile expense; it’s hard to work if your back is bothering you or you’re not comfortable.
Get the tools you need You’ll get a lot of advice about investing in various work tools, such as a standing desk or a separate work computer.
If your company is requiring you to work from home, find out what tools they’ll provide and what they’ll pay for.
If you end up working from home long term, you’ll figure out what you need and what you can afford.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ursula K. Le Guin on Being a Man”

One of the most important authors of our time, Ursula K. Le Guin has influenced such celebrated literary icons as Neil Gaiman and Salman Rushdie.
This is what Le Guin examines in an extraordinary essay titled “Introducing Myself,” which Le Guin first wrote as a performance piece in the 1980s and later updated for the beautifully titled, beautifully written, beautifully wide-ranging 2004 collection The Wave in the Mind: Talks and Essays on the Writer, the Reader, and the Imagination.
Le Guin turns to the problem of the body, which is indeed problematic in the context of this Generic He:. I admit it, I am actually a very poor imitation or substitute man, and you could see it when I tried to wear those army surplus clothes with ammunition pockets that were trendy and I looked like a hen in a pillowcase.
Men are people, people are men, that has been well established, and so people, real people, the right kind of people, are lean.
I’m really lousy at being people, because I’m not lean at all but sort of podgy, with actual fat places.
I get born before they invent women, and I live all these decades trying so hard to be a good man that I forget all about staying young, and so I didn’t.
I keep thinking there must have been something that a real man could have done about it.
Sometimes I think I might just as well exercise my option, stop short in front of the five-barred gate, and let the nazi fall off onto his head. If I’m no good at pretending to be a man and no good at being young, I might just as well start pretending that I am an old woman.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Some Things That Have Helped Me Worry Less”

I worry about making mistakes, getting criticized, having my business fail, being awkward or rude in social situations and lots of other things.
Things I’ve Done to Worry Less Most problems in life are stubborn, rather than complicated.
This approach is different because most of us spend our time trying to “Stop” ourselves from worrying, or try to “Solve” the worry by imagining a way to avoid the threat.
You may worry that you said something weird to that person one time, and forget about it a few days later.
This worry has often been stoked by seeing highly-public cases of someone having their career ruined because of a relatively innocent mistake.
Ask if a Worry is Actionable, Not Rational I got an email from a reader who also struggles with anxiety, and said that although he can see from a distant perspective that many of his anxieties are irrational, he can’t so easily separate the legitimate worries from the ridiculous ones when they’re afflicting him.
The things I fear are not things that are totally without merit, although I should probably worry about them less than I do typically.
When a worry can’t change your response, it’s not helpful, even if it might be rational.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why the Best Things in Life Are All Backwards”

The second lesson of drown-proofing is a bit more obvious, but also paradoxical: the more you panic, the more oxygen you will burn and the more likely you are to fall unconscious and drown.
All give back less the more you do them, the more you try, or the more you have.
Control – The more we strive to control our own feelings and impulses, the more powerless we will feel.
Conversely, the more we accept our feelings and impulses, the more we’re able to direct them and process them.
Love – The more we try to make others love and accept us, the less they will, and more importantly, the less we will love and accept ourselves.
Confidence – The more we try to feel confident, the more insecurity and anxiety we will create.
The more we accept our faults, the more comfortable we will feel in our own skin.
The more we try to add meaning to others’ lives, the more profound impact we will feel.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Nine Habits to Increase Your Energy”

If your habits are misaligned, you can get into a cycle where you feel worse and worse, until your it’s a struggle just to keep up.
Here are nine habits you can work on this year to increase your energy levels.
Habit #1: Go to Sleep Early Sleep is the foundation of your energy.
Habit #2: Exercise Every Day Exercise is a long-term investment in your energy levels.
Make a habit of doing some pushups or burpees every day throughout the day.
Habit #4: Do Your Hard Work in the Morning Aim to get your most important work done in the first four hours of the workday, starting as soon as possible.
Start working hard and you’ll overcome procrastination and keep going throughout the day.
Habit #9: Align Your Life The last habit isn’t a one-time process, but an ongoing effort to bring the different elements of your life out of conflict and into alignment with one another.

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Summary of “Still Waltzing: Robbie Robertson on Martin Scorsese, the Band, and 60 Years in Music”

Robertson wrote many of the group’s classic songs, including “The Weight,” “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down,” and “Up on Cripple Creek,” and he and his bandmates frequently recorded and toured with Dylan in the ’60s and ’70s. The five original members of the Band performed together for the last time at a 1976 Thanksgiving concert at the Winterland Ballroom in San Francisco.
Robertson invited Scorsese to chronicle the concert, and the resulting documentary, The Last Waltz, marked the beginning of a 40-plus-year professional and personal relationship between the musician and director, who worked and caroused together during and after the making of that movie and have teamed up for 10 subsequent Scorsese films.
I just worked harder than anybody could ever imagine, and I ended up getting hired at 16 years old playing in a Southern rock ‘n’ roll band.
My life just trying to make that alienation work for me in some kind of way.
We’re still mixing it up, and every time the next movie comes up, we go on this mission of trying to find out, “What does this sucker sound like? What do we do in this?” And sometimes it’s finding an incredible counterpoint, something that should never work in a million years, and it’s absolutely magic.
Once Were Brothers portrays you and Garth as the members of the Band who were slightly removed from the hedonistic side of the experience and more focused on your family and work.
So was working on music for movies a natural transition after sort of subsuming yourself in those collective creations?
When you were working on your first solo album, you said, “It’s easy to be a genius in your twenties. In your forties it’s difficult.” So what is it in your 70s? I’m still trying to find out.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Running Ruined My Relationship, Killed My Faith and Saved My Life”

The day my doctor released me from in-patient psych, he said, “Allison, I’ll make you a deal. You can go home on the following conditions: 1) You will take Prozac, the high dose, and you won’t even think about getting off it for an entire year, and 2) You will make yourself run, every day, for at least 20 minutes. Because your life depends on it.”
So began my relationship with running, and my boyfriend’s with organized religion.
An athletic activity consisting solely of running felt like suffering, distilled to its most concentrated form.
Running got into me, somehow, in a way I couldn’t shake; the understanding that my physical ability to finish the practice or the race didn’t really matter.
The parasites he got on his mission ruined him for running forever.
You’d think I’d be done with running after that.
The running deal I struck almost a decade before with my boyfriend had left me a triple-loser: 1) It had ruined, what I thought, was the greatest love of my life; 2) I was losing my entire belief system; and 3) I was so far down in the bell jar I couldn’t will myself to walk down the hospital hallway to eat lunch, much less run, ever again.
I was surprised when he said, “I predict you’re the kind of person who won’t like how life feels on Prozacthat something about you is a little addicted to suffering. I think if you need to suffer, you might as well try to get some adrenaline and endorphins into your brain while you’re doing it. I’m telling you to run because I’m thinking I’ll be lucky if I can get you to stay on Prozac for a year. And I’m hoping that running will carry you through after that. And I’m saying 20 minutes because I hope that number will stick in your brain as something you’ll feel really pathetic trying to talk yourself out of.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “To Everyone Who Feels Behind: Your Work Matters”

Every time you feel that your life is not the way it SHOULD be, you’re trying to play God.Give yourself a break and understand one thing: Your work matters.
What’s the alternative? Give up? Drink a glass of scotch and say that the world is messed up? Come on – life’s not an Ernest Hemingway novel.
You’re not some kind of puppet master who can control life.
Because we’re all so obsessed with outcomes, we think that life is measured in milestones.
Productivity is about trying to find a way to enjoy your work and life.
You need to realize that whatever you’re doing NOW matters.
You need to stop listening to people who are at a different stage in life.
So what if this person drives a Porsche? So what if that person bought a new house? Don’t make yourself miserable by going faster in life.

The orginal article.