Summary of “The Single Most Important Interview Technique That Nearly Everyone Leaves Out”

What they lacked was that most important quality that you need to look for in every hire, empathy.
I’m sure these people have some old and deep scars that account for their lack of empathy, but I’m not a therapist and my role isn’t to run a rehab clinic, but to choose people who will add value and integrity to your company.
How do you interview for empathy? Well, the good news is that you can.
The interview techniques most of us use will never surface a lack of empathy.
If you talk to a narcissist, which is the supreme form of a person who lacks empathy, you will get outstanding responses.
An Out Of Body Experience To get at a person’s inherent ability to express empathy you need to get them to step outside of themselves.
It won’t take long to figure out if the person you’re interviewing does in fact have a capacity and a competency for empathy.
These qualities are not in opposition to empathy; it’s not zero sum! If you expect to hire leaders and team players who will build long term trust and committed teams then you need to hire people who have the capacity to listen to and feel for others.

The orginal article.

Summary of “27 Words You Should Never Use to Describe Yourself”

Do you use cheesy clichés, overblown superlatives, or breathless adjectives to describe yourself in your social media profiles and marketing materials? Do you write things about yourself you would never actually have the nerve to say?
Here are some words that are great when other people use them to describe you-but you should never use to describe yourself, along with a few other words that everyone seems to use.
Say you have “Extensive experience in web design.” Fine, but how long you’ve been in business indicates nothing: You could still be the worst programmer in the world.
What matters more is what you’ve done: how many sites you’ve created, how many back-end systems you’ve installed, how many customer-specific applications you’ve developed …. Don’t tell us how long you’ve been doing it.
Some of those terms may truly describe you, but since they are being used to describe everyone, they’ve lost their impact.
You’ve gotten results, made things happen, come through in the clutch … so share a few facts and figures instead. Describe on-time performance rates, or waste percentages, or under-budget statistics; let your track record be proved by your achievements.
Refer to yourself that way, and it’s obvious you’re trying way too hard to impress other people-or yourself.
Try the word focus, concentration, or specialization instead. Or try love, as in, “I love incorporating an elegant design aesthetic in everyday objects.” For whatever reason, that works for me.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Brad Pitt on ‘Ad Astra,’ Faith, and Being a Gazelle”

Pitt made the movie with an old friend of his, the director James Gray, and both men will tell you that-though Ad Astra takes the form of an action film, complete with moon-set buggy chases and space-capsule shoot-outs-it’s really about the ideas and thoughts and fears that seize you as you roll into late middle age.
In the film, Pitt’s McBride is isolated and almost pathologically repressed.
The parallels with Pitt himself were not lost on either man.
In the poolhouse, I asked Pitt if he found it difficult to play a character as alone as McBride is in Ad Astra.
“I’m going down,” Pitt said, trying to regain his balance.
Perhaps because of how infrequently Pitt stars in a movie these days, it’s tempting to try to figure out what in Once Upon a Time or Ad Astra drew him off the sidelines and back to acting.
Pitt will acknowledge that these choices have become increasingly personal as his career has gone on.
It’s when he goes from the Pitt who was a ’90s cinema icon-chiseled, heartthrob-y, gravely standing at the center of whatever movie he was in-to the Pitt we know now, the one who is completely without hang-ups about being looked at, who is confident enough in his absurd beauty and charisma to do weird and character-actor-ish things with it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Happened When I Tried to Learn Something New Every Day for a Month”

In attempt to challenge myself and step out of my comfort zone, I’ve decided to learn a new skill every day for a month.
I already learn new things everyday-reporting inherently prompts you to learn something each time you work on a story, even when it’s about an industry or topic that you’ve covered for years.
Thanks to Fast Company’s extensive coverage of brain science and its effect on productivity, I knew it wouldn’t be as simple as hitting up a new website, and I wanted at least the majority of the things I learned to fall into the category of useful skills.
So I parsed out a projected four weeks of learning roughly along the lines of cognitive and physical skills that ran the gamut between picking up some basic words and phrases of a new language and reciting poetry, to the aforementioned knitting, and the knife skills used in cooking.
I scheduled the more challenging ones for the beginning of the week, and on the weekends I gave myself the opportunity to just learn some fun facts.
From Learning a Language to How to Make Radish Flowers I started the challenge by trying to learn a few simple phrases in Hebrew since I am going to be attending a tech conference in Israel in September.
Making the Knowledge Stick What I tried to do while taking on these new skills and knowledge was to be mindful of how I was learning.
I discovered this through a report in The New York Times in which three experts confirmed that although children naturally learn languages more easily, adults can too, but it helps if the one they are trying to learn is in the same family as their first.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Don’t Change Yourself. Improve Yourself.”

You might know yourself, but you’re not BEING yourself.
The reason is that we somehow feel we have to be different people in different situations.
“To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment.”
We really live in a world that tries to turn you into something you’re not.
Too often people just try to rebel and say that other people don’t get them.
“The conclusion bears repeating: Do not try to change yourself - you are unlikely to succeed. But work hard to improve the way you perform.”
Who do you NOT want to be? The whole ‘do not try to change yourself’ idea took me many years to apply in my life.
Because that’s one of the few things in life that’s really worth it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Biggest Wastes Of Time We Regret When We Get Older”

When I look back, my biggest time regrets aren’t spending too much time on Twitter or mismanaging my daily tasks.
Not only did I look like an arse, I could’ve also saved a fair amount of time that day by simply asking my boss what he meant.
Like a lot of people, I made some common bad decisions that wasted both my time and the time of the person I was with.
Every time the thought comes back, simply remind yourself that you have already been forgiven, so there’s no reason to feel bad anymore.
It’s easy to waste time worrying about other people, too.
Don’t get me wrong – your friends and loved ones mean a lot to you, and you want to spend time nurturing them.
Regret is another big waste of time, so there’s no point in beating yourself up over these.
The sooner you learn from them the sooner you can free up your time and energy to live the life you want.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ursula K. Le Guin on Being a Man”

One of the most important authors of our time, Ursula K. Le Guin has influenced such celebrated literary icons as Neil Gaiman and Salman Rushdie.
This is what Le Guin examines in an extraordinary essay titled “Introducing Myself,” which Le Guin first wrote as a performance piece in the 1980s and later updated for the beautifully titled, beautifully written, beautifully wide-ranging 2004 collection The Wave in the Mind: Talks and Essays on the Writer, the Reader, and the Imagination.
Le Guin turns to the problem of the body, which is indeed problematic in the context of this Generic He:. I admit it, I am actually a very poor imitation or substitute man, and you could see it when I tried to wear those army surplus clothes with ammunition pockets that were trendy and I looked like a hen in a pillowcase.
Men are people, people are men, that has been well established, and so people, real people, the right kind of people, are lean.
I’m really lousy at being people, because I’m not lean at all but sort of podgy, with actual fat places.
I get born before they invent women, and I live all these decades trying so hard to be a good man that I forget all about staying young, and so I didn’t.
I keep thinking there must have been something that a real man could have done about it.
Sometimes I think I might just as well exercise my option, stop short in front of the five-barred gate, and let the nazi fall off onto his head. If I’m no good at pretending to be a man and no good at being young, I might just as well start pretending that I am an old woman.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Running Ruined My Relationship, Killed My Faith and Saved My Life”

The day my doctor released me from in-patient psych, he said, “Allison, I’ll make you a deal. You can go home on the following conditions: 1) You will take Prozac, the high dose, and you won’t even think about getting off it for an entire year, and 2) You will make yourself run, every day, for at least 20 minutes. Because your life depends on it.”
So began my relationship with running, and my boyfriend’s with organized religion.
An athletic activity consisting solely of running felt like suffering, distilled to its most concentrated form.
Running got into me, somehow, in a way I couldn’t shake; the understanding that my physical ability to finish the practice or the race didn’t really matter.
The parasites he got on his mission ruined him for running forever.
You’d think I’d be done with running after that.
The running deal I struck almost a decade before with my boyfriend had left me a triple-loser: 1) It had ruined, what I thought, was the greatest love of my life; 2) I was losing my entire belief system; and 3) I was so far down in the bell jar I couldn’t will myself to walk down the hospital hallway to eat lunch, much less run, ever again.
I was surprised when he said, “I predict you’re the kind of person who won’t like how life feels on Prozacthat something about you is a little addicted to suffering. I think if you need to suffer, you might as well try to get some adrenaline and endorphins into your brain while you’re doing it. I’m telling you to run because I’m thinking I’ll be lucky if I can get you to stay on Prozac for a year. And I’m hoping that running will carry you through after that. And I’m saying 20 minutes because I hope that number will stick in your brain as something you’ll feel really pathetic trying to talk yourself out of.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to stop apologizing”

Though often attributed to women, apologizing isn’t just a female problem.
What makes some of us fall into this counterproductive habit? It might be performance anxiety, such as our first day on a new job, or when we lack confidence in our ability to run with the “Big dogs.” It’s almost as if we’re apologizing for taking up space, which is no way to make a good impression on a job or with a client.
The over-apology habit may begin innocently when we spontaneously apologize for a real offense.
If you’re constantly apologizing for what you can’t control, try this: “I know I’ve had to reschedule this meeting several times. Thank you for understanding.”
Case study: How to spot when you do need to apologize.
Someone who knows when and how to apologize appropriately has a huge advantage in the empathy column.
Try taking a friend or trusted coworker into your confidence about what you’re trying to accomplish, and agree on a high sign she can give you if she hears you apologizing unnecessarily.
Bottom line: Don’t apologize unnecessarily-know how to recognize when a sincere apology is necessary.

The orginal article.

Summary of “4 reasons you can’t seem to get your message across”

4 minute Read. How many times has your boss told you to get to the point when you’re trying to explain something-whether it’s giving a speech, or outlining the reason why you chose a particular approach over another? No matter how hard you try, you still can’t seem to do it.
To get to the point, you have to learn how to jump to a conclusion.
Just as a diver needs a springboard to launch into a dive, you need a structure to get to the point.
Having observed thousands and thousands of businesspeople talking, I noticed that the speaker who got to the point used an oral bullet point structure.
Next time you feel that pressure to jump into the conversation, begin by rephrasing what you’re trying to connect your message to, and you’ll discover how quickly you can get to your point with power and precision.
To get to the point, you need to focus on strategy-why does the audience care? You need to focus on calculating your best shot, not covering it up.
By shifting from fear to focus, you’ll be able to get to the point and increase your odds of making a difference through your message.
Guess what? Your audience doesn’t want to be dazzled by your brilliance-they want to get your point quickly.

The orginal article.