Summary of “Fund managers are preparing for a crash”

The signs are starting to add up that the United States is at the top of the economic cycle, and therefore headed down, likely into a bear market and recession, an increasing number of economists and money managers say.
“Liquidity drives markets and liquidity is shifting,” Yusko said at the Inside Smart Beta conference last week in New York.
Neither Yusko nor Beinner called for an immediate market turn, but say investors should be mindful of risk and hedging their bets, particularly in risky assets.
Looking at the upsideBut not everyone sees the economy in immediately dire straits or expects that a crash is on its way.
Many investors say they remain bullish on the stock market, citing strong U.S. data prints and government spending on the horizon that should further stimulate the economy.
Group, told Yahoo Finance he’s expecting the bull market to continue through the rest of this year.
“While the magnitude of the current tech-mania is far less than it was in 2000, the character of today’s stock market increasingly mirrors dot-com,” he said in an earlier note to clients called Dot-com Deja Vu.However, Paulsen also issued a word of warning in an email to Yahoo Finance.
Dion Rabouin is a markets reporter for Yahoo Finance.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Deep in the Pentagon, a secret AI program to find hidden nuclear missiles”

Washington is increasingly concerned about Pyongyang’s development of mobile missiles that can be hidden in tunnels, forests and caves.
The Pentagon research on using AI to identify potential missile threats and track mobile launchers is in its infancy and is just one part of that overall effort.
Budget documents reviewed by Reuters noted plans to expand the focus of the mobile missile launcher program to “The remainder of the 4+1 problem sets.” The Pentagon typically uses the 4+1 terminology to refer to China, Russia, Iran, North Korea and terrorist groups.
TURNING TURTLES INTO RIFLES. Both supporters and critics of using AI to hunt missiles agree that it carries major risks.
U.S. Air Force General John Hyten, the top commander of U.S. nuclear forces, said once AI-driven systems become fully operational, the Pentagon will need to think about creating safeguards to ensure humans – not machines – control the pace of nuclear decision-making, the “Escalation ladder” in Pentagon speak.
Experts at the Rand Corporation, a public policy research body, and elsewhere say there is a high probability that countries like China and Russia could try to trick an AI missile-hunting system, learning to hide their missiles from identification.
Dr. Steven Walker, director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, a pioneer in AI that initially funded what became the Internet, said the Pentagon still needs humans to review AI systems’ conclusions.
Although some officials believe elements of the AI missile program could become viable in the early 2020s, others in the U.S. government and the U.S. Congress fear research efforts are too limited.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Most Successful Ethnic Group in the U.S. May Surprise You”

Nigerians are entering the medical field in the U.S. at an increased rate, leaving their home country to work in American hospitals, where they can earn more and work in better facilities.
Last year, President Donald Trump reportedly said in an Oval Office discussion that Nigerians would never go back to “Their huts” once they saw America.
After the war against Biafra separatists in the ’60s, the Nigerian government sponsored scholarships for students to pursue higher education abroad. English-speaking Nigerian students excelled at universities in the U.S. and U.K., often finding opportunities to continue their education or begin their professional career in their host country.
Dr. Jacqueline Nwando Olayiwola was born in Columbus, Ohio, to such Nigerian immigrant parents.
Her parents did return, but with few jobs available in the economic decline of the 1980s, many Nigerians did not.
Makanjuola intended to one day pursue her career in Nigeria as her parents had, but it’s too hard to leave the U.S., she says: “Many Nigerians intend to go back, but it’s impractical because there’s more opportunity here.”
Anyone from the Nigerian diaspora will tell you their parents gave them three career choices: doctor, lawyer or engineer.
What about Nigerians who come to the U.S. and don’t succeed? Wey, the activist chef, says there’s a lot of pressure to fit a certain mold when you’re Nigerian.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Amazon cuts Whole Foods prices for Prime members in new grocery showdown”

Amazon.com Inc and Whole Foods Market are making a surgical strike in the already brutal grocery price war.
On Wednesday, Whole Foods debuted a much-anticipated loyalty program that offers special discounts to Prime customers, including 10 percent off hundreds of sale items and rotating weekly specials such as $10 per pound off wild-caught halibut steaks.
Amazon previously announced free two-hour delivery from Whole Foods stores for members of Prime, its subscription club with fast shipping and video streaming.
The new loyalty strategy will test whether Amazon’s $13.7 billion deal for Whole Foods brings much-feared disruption and an intensified price war to the $800 billion U.S. grocery industry dominated by Walmart Inc and Kroger Co. Whole Foods, with 463 U.S. stores and roughly 1 percent share of the fragmented U.S. grocery market, has gained momentum since the Amazon merger last summer, Whole Foods co-founder and Chief Executive John Mackey told Reuters.
Still, Philadelphia-area Whole Foods shopper and Prime member Heather Kincade, 46, is going to need convincing.
LOWER MARGINS. In Amazon, Whole Foods has found an owner that is famously comfortable spending away profits on new businesses or on lower prices.
“Given how important it is for Amazon to provide value for their customers, and customers value lower prices, I would think they’d be comfortable operating Whole Foods at a lower margin while experimenting with the operating model,” said Tom Furphy, former vice president of consumables and AmazonFresh, and now chief executive of Consumer Equity Partners.
CEO Rodney McMullen told Reuters earlier this month that the chain’s prices will “Absolutely” be lower than Whole Foods on the typical shopper’s basket of about 50 items per week.

The orginal article.

Summary of “After a week of Russian propaganda, I was questioning everything”

Like its sister outlet RT, Sputnik is a Russian government-funded media outlet, widely seen by Russia experts as a vehicle to disseminate disinformation for the Kremlin, and, like its space-dwelling namesake, to make the West look bad. While RT is television, Sputnik lives on the radio, a wire service and website.
Today, Sputnik operates in 34 countries in more than 30 languages, including, as of this past summer, on an FM station in Washington, D.C. When Sputnik launched stateside, the investigations into Russia’s supposed interference in the U.S. election were accelerating, and the media outlet was greeted with critical coverage.
Because its provider is now a foreign agent, Sputnik is now required to disclose that it is funded by the Russian government.
Over the last month, questioning the chemical attack in Douma dominated the news at Sputnik.
While at Sputnik’s offices, I also sat down with Mindia Gavasheli, a Russian national who runs Sputnik’s D.C. newsroom.
When I sat down with Lee Stranahan, the former Breitbart reporter, who calls himself a “Political futurist,” he shrugged off the idea that Sputnik was Russian propaganda by employing some whataboutism of his own.
“When you work for Sputnik, you get called a traitor and a Putin puppet But why does no one bring up the coup we fomented?” he said, referring to Russian allegations that the U.S. fomented a coup in Ukraine.
As one last attempt to better understand Sputnik, I put myself on a weeklong Sputnik media diet.

The orginal article.

Summary of “China’s Carmakers Want to Dominate World’s Next Era of Driving”

On a bright spring day in Amsterdam, car buffs stepped inside a blacked-out warehouse to nibble on lamb skewers and sip rhubarb cocktails courtesy of Lynk & Co., which was showing off its new hybrid SUV. What seemed like just another launch of a new vehicle was actually something more: the coming-out party for China’s globally ambitious auto industry.
Li is spearheading China’s aspirations to wedge itself among the big three of the global car industry-the U.S., Germany and Japan-so they become the Big Four.
He’s not alone: At least four Chinese carmakers and three Chinese-owned startups-SF Motors Inc., NIO and Byton-plan to sell cars in the U.S. starting next year.
Carmakers may get better visibility of their futures, and those Chinese companies that fear losing sales at home may sense a greater impetus to go abroad. “They are in a better position now than they ever have been,” Anna-Marie Baisden, head of autos research in London with BMI Research, said of Chinese carmakers.
The creeping global influence of China’s industry isn’t limited to getting their wheels on U.S. and European roads.
“China does intend to lead and dominate the electric-vehicle industry.”
China’s knack for speedy adaptation has put the country in a position to lead the auto industry in new technologies, Toyota Motor Corp.’s China Chief Executive Officer Kazuhiro Kobayashi said.
“Developing new-energy vehicles is the only way for China to move from a big automobile country to a powerful automobile hub,” he said when visiting SAIC Motor Corp., a Shanghai government-owned company that partners with GM and Volkswagen in China.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tammy Duckworth: ‘The Military Has Seen the Writing on the Wall’ in North Korea”

When Senator Tammy Duckworth returned from a recent trip to South Korea and Japan, she brought back a sobering message: “Americans simply are not in touch with just how close we are to war on the Korean peninsula.” In a speech at Georgetown University, she laid out the U.S. military maneuvers over the past several months-including a nuclear-powered submarine heading to South Korea, the movement of three aircraft carriers to the Western Pacific, and the Army testing out “Mobilization centers” for deploying troops and training soldiers to fight in tunnels like those beneath North Korea-that inform this worry.
In an interview with me, she said the U.S. military seems to be operating with the attitude that a conflict “‘will probably happen, and we better be ready to go.
Even though the administration continues to emphasize its preference for a diplomatic solution, “I feel like the military hears the war-mongering tendencies coming out of the executive branch and many in the legislative branch and have seen the writing on the wall and they said, ‘Holy cow. We’re more likely to be called on now than we were two years ago,'” Duckworth said.
“But it’s painfully clear from my visit to the and these movements that I am seeing that we shouldn’t ignore the signals that our military is sending with these actions. We know that the North Koreans and our allies in the region are certainly paying attention.”
The drums of war are not booming; there have been no major U.S. military movements or public-messaging campaigns by the Trump administration or new advisories to American civilians or companies, for instance.
Robert Neller, the commandant of the U.S. Marine Corps, acknowledged the limitations of military plans during an appearance at the Center for Strategic and International Studies on Thursday.
Alexander Vorontsov, a Russian Korea scholar, recently wrote that North Korean Foreign Ministry officials he visited in Pyongyang in November told him they did “Not want war” but would “Not hide from it either.” They “Feared that the U.S. was already trying to shape the battlefield for a military operation against the North.” And, Vorontsov continued, the North Korean government “Is not bluffing when it says that ‘only one question remains: When will war break out?’ [O]ur counterparts emphasized that ‘our soldiers have long been sleeping without removing their boots.'”.
Gallego worries that “We [could] trip ourselves into a war” no one wants-if, “For example, the North assumes one of our moves is a strike and they decide to do a preemptive strike.” Neller might respond that one of the points of U.S. military preparations is to prevent war by deterring the adversary.

The orginal article.

Summary of “U.S. soldiers are revealing sensitive and dangerous information by jogging”

An interactive map posted on the Internet that shows the whereabouts of people who use fitness devices such as Fitbit also reveals highly sensitive information about the locations and activities of soldiers at U.S. military bases, in what appears to be a major security oversight.
Zooming in on those areas brings into focus the locations and outlines of known U.S. military bases, as well as of other unknown and potentially sensitive sites – presumably because American soldiers and other personnel are using fitness trackers as they move around.
Adam Rawnsley, a Daily Beast journalist, noticed a lot of jogging activity on the beach near a suspected CIA base in Mogadishu, Somalia.
The site does not identify app users and shows many locations that may be connected to aid agencies, U.N. facilities and the military bases of other nations – or any group whose personnel are likely to use fitness trackers, said Tobias Schneider, an international security analyst based in Germany.
The data also offers a mine of information to anyone who wants to attack or ambush U.S. troops in or around the bases, Schneider said, including patterns of activity inside the bases.
The map of Afghanistan appears as a spider web of lines connecting bases, showing supply routes, as does northeast Syria, where the United States maintains a network of mostly unpublicized bases.
At a site in northern Syria near a dam, where analysts have suspected the U.S. military is building a base, the map shows a small blob of activity accompanied by an intense line along the nearby dam, suggesting that the personnel at the site jog regularly along the dam, Schneider said.
The perimeter of the main Russian base in Syria, Hmeimim, is clearly visible – as are several routes out of the base that are presumably taken by patrols, he said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Dark Side of America’s Rise to Oil Superpower”

Almost five decades later, with oil hovering near $65 a barrel, daily U.S. crude output is about to hit the eight-digit mark again.
It’s a significant milestone on the way to fulfilling a dream that a generation ago seemed far-fetched: By the end of the year, the U.S. may well be the world’s biggest oil producer.
U.S. shale is “Seemingly on steroids,” says Amrita Sen, chief oil analyst at consultant Energy Aspects Ltd. in London.
A decade ago, U.S. net oil imports stood at more than 12 million barrels a day.
With shale surging, U.S. imports of Saudi oil plunged to a 30-year low last year.
It’s now possible for the U.S. to argue that other countries should help shoulder the burden of policing the shipping lanes leading to Middle Eastern and North African oil exporters.
The quality of shale oil is so high that it yields little diesel, the fuel that powers manufacturing.
There’s a chance the world will witness that rarest of market loop-de-loops-high oil prices as well as rising U.S. production.

The orginal article.

Summary of “China’s breathtaking transformation into a scientific superpower”

The report’s main conclusion lies elsewhere: China has become – or is on the verge of becoming – a scientific and technical superpower.
China has become the second- largest R&D spender, accounting for 21 percent of the world total of nearly $2 trillion in 2015.
Only the United States, at 26 percent, ranks higher, but if present growth rates continue, China will soon become the biggest spender.
Although the United States and the European Union each produce more studies on biomedical subjects, China leads in engineering studies.
American papers tend to be cited more often than the Chinese papers , suggesting that they involve more fundamental research questions, but China is catching up.
Technology is mobile, and gains made in China could be enjoyed elsewhere, and vice versa.
In our contentious world, China’s technological prowess is potentially threatening, as the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission, a congressional watchdog group, has often pointed out.
If China makes a breakthrough in a crucial technology – satellites, missiles, cyberwarfare, artificial intelligence, electromagnetic weapons – the result could be a major shift in the strategic balance and, possibly, war.

The orginal article.