Summary of “Uniqlo Is Gap for Millennials”

Quality isn’t an attribute typically associated with fast fashion, but Uniqlo has also managed to build a reputation for durability.
Uniqlo can’t promise anything approaching that longevity, but in an era of disposable fashion, a Uniqlo garment, made from hearty materials and cut in a timeless style, can feel like an investment piece.
Like a mountain outfitter, Uniqlo touts the use of a number of signature technologies in its clothing.
HEATTECH, marketed as an innovative insulating system, and AIRism, which is promoted as moisture-wicking, are woven into a variety of Uniqlo staples-socks, underwear, camisoles, leggings, pants-supposedly making them more comfortable and resilient than competitors’ products.
More than 800 of the brand’s stores are in Japan-where Uniqlo, by its own estimates, accounts for about 6.5 percent of the total apparel market.
To achieve the kind of dominance in the U.S. that the company enjoys closer to home, Uniqlo will need to grow significantly.
“They have less brand awareness.” Many Americans have never heard of Uniqlo, or don’t know how to pronounce it.
As Uniqlo learned when it arrived on American shores, first impressions can be hard to manage.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Understanding Trump’s Trade War – Foreign Policy”

2019 could be a defining moment for U.S. trade policy.
Two years into Donald Trump’s presidency, it should finally become clear whether the U.S. president’s brazen rhetoric on the subject is simply a negotiating ploy in the pursuit of new deals or whether a trade war-and with it the destruction of the post-World War II international order-is his real end goal.
Trump withdrew from the Trans-Pacific Partnership without ever proposing a replacement, and he appeared ready to do the same with the North American Free Trade Agreement.
The Trump administration’s actions could be read as either an attempt to force China to change its economic practices or an effort to simply punish it by dismantling the trade partnership.
Third, Trump will have to take a stand on the World Trade Organization, a body that regulates trade among its 164 members.
Trump has called the organization the worst trade deal ever reached-even worse than NAFTA-and on several occasions has expressed his desire to leave it.
The final area to pay attention to will be how Trump deals with the trade deficit.
Whereas previous presidents have raised trade barriers in difficult economic times, Trump has initiated them during a period when U.S. economic performance is strong and domestic industries are not asking for such help.

The orginal article.

Summary of “10 Conflicts to Watch in 2019 – Foreign Policy”

So too has his flouting of America’s international commitments: tearing up the Iran nuclear deal and, worse, threatening to impose economic punishment on those who choose to abide by it; hinting he will leave the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty if U.S. demands are not met rather than working within it to press Russia to comply; and signaling, through attacks on the International Criminal Court and chest-thumping speeches about U.S. sovereignty, that Washington regards its actions and those of its friends as beyond accountability.
U.S. pressure to end the conflict could intensify in 2019.
Only pressure from Europe, Oman, and Iran on the Houthis; from the United States on Saudi Arabia and the UAE; from those two Gulf countries on the Yemeni government; and from Congress on the U.S. administration stands a chance of making a difference.
U.S. policymakers mostly regard such an arrangement as inimical to U.S. alliances and interests.
Much like 2018, 2019 presents risks of confrontation-deliberate or inadvertent-involving the United States, Saudi Arabia, Israel, and Iran.
The murder amplified criticism in the United States of both Saudi foreign policy and the seemingly unconditional U.S. support for it.
Foreign actors would maintain a fragile equilibrium in various parts of the country: among Israel, Iran, and Russia in the southwest; Russia and Turkey in the northwest; and the United States and Turkey in the northeast.
Nigerians will go to the polls in February 2019 to elect a president and new federal legislature, and again in March to choose state governors and lawmakers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “18 striking findings from 2018”

Unauthorized immigrants are increasingly likely to be long-term U.S. residents: Two-thirds of adult immigrants without legal status have lived in the country for more than 10 years.
While about a quarter of all U.S. Facebook users ages 18 and older say they have deleted the Facebook app from their phone, this share increases to 44% among Facebook users ages 18 to 29.
8The number of refugees resettled in the U.S. decreased more than in any other country in 2017.
Non-U.S. countries resettled more than twice as many refugees as the U.S. in 2017, marking the first time since the adoption of the 1980 U.S. Refugee Act that America’s total fell below the combined total from the rest of the world.
Americans’ opinions on whether the U.S. has a responsibility to accept refugees have grown even more partisan than they had been.
While nearly seven-in-ten Republicans and Republican-leaning independents say the U.S. does not have a responsibility to take in refugees, nearly three-quarters of Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents say it does have such responsibility.
11Most people around the globe say China plays a more important role in the world today than it did a decade ago – but most also say it’s better for the U.S. to lead the way.
A median of 70% across 25 countries say China is playing a more important role today compared with 10 years ago, while 31% think the same about the U.S. At the same time, a median of 63% believe it would be better to have the U.S. as the world’s leading power, but just 19% say this about China.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Tragedy of Jamal Khashoggi”

Circumstantial evidence, and the fact that Khashoggi remains missing a week after he was last seen alive entering the consulate, has accumulated to the point that the burden of proof falls on the Saudis to show that Khashoggi left the consulate unscathed and of his own accord.
A drip-drip of other tidbits of detail, such as the suggestion that Khashoggi was asked to return to the consulate three days after his initial appointment to complete paperwork needed for his forthcoming marriage to a Turkish woman, or that local Turkish staff reportedly were told not to come to work the day of his disappearance, and the discovery that a team of 15 Saudi security personnel flew into Istanbul and were at the consulate during Khashoggi’s visit, have added to the crescendo of accusations that the Saudis have been unable to explain away or offer even a plausible alternative course of events.
If the Saudis indeed killed Khashoggi and thought they could get away with it, they have made a grave miscalculation.
The furious Saudi response to comments by the Canadian foreign minister served notice that Saudi Arabia under MBS is not prepared to tolerate external criticism of its domestic affairs, and the descriptions of many of the political detainees as “Agents of embassies” and “Traitors” in Saudi state-linked media left foreign diplomats shaken by the vehemence of the authorities’ reaction.
Having bragged in 2017 about how he got the Saudis to stump up $110 billion in deals as the price of making Riyadh his first overseas visit as president, Donald Trump has signaled his reluctance to see those agreements jeopardized as a result of an anti-Saudi backlash in the U.S. Trump has touted the agreements made in Riyadh as evidence of his ability as a deal-maker to secure U.S. jobs and expressed concern that the Saudis would turn to competitors, such as Russia or China, if the U.S. became hostile to Saudi investment.
If congressional anger persists, it may translate into renewed actions to rein in U.S. arms sales to Saudi Arabia and support for Saudi initiatives such as the war in Yemen, building on the momentum from a Senate attempt last spring to invoke a provision in the 1973 War Powers Act that would force a vote to end U.S. military assistance to the Saudi-led coalition.
Jamal Khashoggi spent his career flitting in and out of the Saudi establishment and the last year of his life chronicling the trajectory of the kingdom MBS was attempting to make his own.
How tragically ironic that in his disappearance and probable death, Khashoggi may have done more to get Washington to see the troubling reality of MBS’ Saudi Arabia than he ever could have done alive and through his writing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “H-1B: Fleeing Silicon Valley for Canada in the age of Trump”

Two weeks: That’s how quickly a foreign technology worker in Silicon Valley can get an employment permit from Canada.
As the administration of President Donald Trump has increased scrutiny of H-1B visas for skilled foreign workers and plans to ban their spouses from holding jobs in the U.S., Canada has been moving aggressively to suck top foreign talent out of Silicon Valley and other technology-rich regions of the U.S. The Canadian government won’t say if it’s leveraging the tumultuous and uncertain immigration climate in the U.S. But experts say Canada’s year-old “Global Skills Strategy” program, which offers work permits similar to America’s H-1B visa, is ideally structured to attract highly skilled foreign tech workers to Toronto, Montreal or Vancouver.
Trump’s plan to overhaul the H-1B – a visa intended for the kind of skilled workers Silicon Valley companies rely on but attacked by critics as a tool to replace American workers with cheaper foreign labor – has ratcheted up anxiety levels and created uncertainty for many skilled foreign tech workers in the U.S. “.
Rather than simply get a work permit, Khandelwal opted to obtain permanent residence in Canada – the equivalent of a U.S. green card.
Matthew Kolken, a New York immigration lawyer whose firm helps clients immigrate to both Canada and the U.S., said he’s had about a dozen foreign-citizen clients decide to move to Canada even though they were already in the midst of official proceedings to come to the U.S. “They gave up on their American dream,” Kolken said.
Google software engineer Karthik Ravindran, in Silicon Valley on an H-1B, applied for permanent residence in Canada late last year with his wife after the Trump administration first proposed banning foreign spouses from working.
Despite disruptions arising from Trump’s approach to immigration, the tech industry in Silicon Valley – where outrageous housing costs and horrific commutes are the norm – has more to worry about than Canada, said Harj Taggar, CEO of San Francisco-based Triplebyte, a jobs platform for software engineers.
A prominent Vancouver technology entrepreneur who travels regularly to Silicon Valley to help foreign tech workers move to Canada and launch startups, believes the U.S. immigration climate under Trump will produce broad, long-term effects.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Is College in America So Expensive?”

The business of providing an education is so expensive because college is different from other things that people buy, argue Feldman and his colleague Robert Archibald in their 2011 book, Why Does College Cost So Much? College is a service, for one thing, not a product, which means it doesn’t get cheaper along with changes in manufacturing technology.
College is a service delivered mostly by workers with college degrees-whose salaries have risen more dramatically than those of low-skilled service workers over the past several decades.
College is not the only service to have gotten wildly more expensive in recent decades, Feldman and Archibald point out.
The new data show that U.S. colleges currently have a slightly lower ratio of students to teachers than the average for the developed world-another metric favored in college rankings.
“Ironically, these students are often paying more to go to a nonselective four-year college or even a community college than they would pay to go to the most selective, most resource-rich institutions in the United States,” as Hoxby told NPR.Meanwhile, when it comes to health care, low-income Americans tend to be less familiar with the concepts of deductibles, coinsurance rates, and provider networks, according to a variety of studies, which makes it extremely difficult to choose a health-care plan.
Ultimately, college is expensive in the U.S. for the same reason MRIs are expensive: There is no central mechanism to control price increases.
Over a lifetime, people with bachelor’s degrees earn more than half a million dollars more than people with no college degree in the U.S. In fact, no other country rewards a college degree as richly as the United States, and few other countries punish people so relentlessly for not having one.
This convoluted, complicated, inconsistent system continues to exist, and continues to be so expensive because college in America is still worth the price.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How the U.S. Has Failed to Protect the 2018 Election-and Four Ways to Protect 2020”

While this failure has left the U.S. unprepared to protect the 2018 elections, there is still a chance to defend American democracy in 2020.
Following an acrimonious debate inside the White House, as reported by the New York Times’s David Sanger, President Obama rejected several retaliatory measures in response to Russian interference-and U.S. intelligence agencies did not emerge with a full-throated description of Russia’s meddling until after the election.
Republican efforts to downplay Russia’s role constitute a dangerous gamble: It is highly unlikely that future election meddling will continue to have such an unbalanced and positive impact for the GOP. The Russians are currently the United States’ most visible information-warfare adversaries, but they are not alone.
Direct attacks against the U.S. election system itself-as opposed to influence operations aimed at voters-were clearly a consideration of U.S. adversaries: There are multiple reports of the widely diffuse U.S. election infrastructure being mapped out and experimentally exploited by Russian groups in 2016.
The combination of offensive cyber techniques with a disinformation campaign would enable a hostile nation or group to create an aura of confusion and illegitimacy around an election that could lead to half of the American populace forever considering that election to be stolen.
While it is much too late to effectively rehabilitate election security for the 2018 midterms, there are four straightforward steps the United States can take to prepare for potential attacks in 2020.
In the run-up to the most recent French and German elections, the respective cybersecurity agencies of these countries had access to intelligence on likely adversaries, the legal authority to coordinate election protection and the technical chops to work directly with technology platforms.
For states’ autonomy to thrive, it is critical for every state to follow the lead of Colorado and a handful of others in building competent statewide election security teams that set strong standards for verifiable voting, perform security testing of local systems, and provide a rapid-reaction function in case of an attempted attack.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Here’s How America Uses Its Land”

Using surveys, satellite images and categorizations from various government agencies, the U.S. Department of Agriculture divides the U.S. into six major types of land.
Piecing the data together state-by-state can give a general sense of how U.S. land is used.
The actual land area used to grow the food Americans eat is much smaller-only about the size of Indiana, Illinois and half of Iowa combined.
The amount of U.S. land used to produce citrus fruits alone is larger than Rhode Island.
More than one-third of U.S. land is used for pasture-by far the largest land-use type in the contiguous 48 states.
Forestland is the last major category of land categorized by the USDA. Unprotected forests and timberland constitute a quarter of the contiguous U.S. According to the U.S. Forest Service, timber harvests typically occur on about 11 million acres each year.
Much of U.S. land serves specific purposes, such as the 2 million acres devoted to golf courses or the 3 million acres for airports.
Magazine, since 2008 the amount of land owned by the 100 largest private landowners has grown from 28 million acres to 40 million, an area larger than the state of Florida.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Mortgage, Groupon and card debt: how the bottom half bolsters U.S. economy”

A Reuters analysis of U.S. household data shows that the bottom 60 percent of income-earners have accounted for most of the rise in spending over the past two years even as the their finances worsened – a break with a decades-old trend where the top 40 percent had primarily fueled consumption growth.
The data shows the rise in median expenditures has outpaced before-tax income for the lower 40 percent of earners in the five years to mid-2017 while the upper half has increased its financial cushion, deepening income disparities.
As a result, over the past year signs of financial fragility have been multiplying, with credit card and auto loan delinquencies on the rise and savings plumbing their lowest since 2005.
Some economists say that without the $1.5 trillion in tax cuts enacted in January spending, which has grown by around 3 percent a year over the past few years, could already be stalling now.
In the past, rising incomes of the upper 40 percent of earners have driven most of the consumption growth, but since 2016 consumer spending has been primarily fueled by a run-down in savings, mainly by the bottom 60 percent of earners, according to Oxford Economics.
Hourly wages for lower- and middle-income workers rose just over 2 percent in the year to March 2017, compared with about 4 percent for those near the top and bottom, while spending jumped by roughly 8 percent.
Economists say one symptom of financial strain was last year’s spike in serious delinquencies on U.S. credit card debt, which many poorer households use as a stop-gap measure.
More borrowers have also been falling behind on auto loans, which helped bring leverage on non-mortgage household debt to a record high in the first quarter of this year.

The orginal article.