Summary of “How We Got From Doc Brown to Walter White”

Westworld, Orphan Black, Masters of Sex, CSI, Bones, House, The Big Bang Theory, and several others have all written scientists as diverse and complex humans who have almost nothing in common with the scientists I saw in the 1980s movies I watched as a kid.
As a result, scientists on screen have evolved from stereotypes and villains to credible and positive characters, due in part to scientists themselves, anxious to be part of the action and the public’s education.
Scientists were smart and rational, the report noted, but of all the occupational roles on TV, scientists were the least sociable.
“We know we need scientists to fix up the mess we’re making of the planet. If there’s any hope at all, it has to come from scientists who monitor the risk and are able to find ways to overcome that risk. Whereas before, scientists were seen as part of the risk.”
Eight years after Doc Emmett Brown sent his mad invention traveling through time in Back to the Future, scientists in Jurassic Park enthralled visitors with creatures from the past.
Although Doc Brown’s chaotic goofiness was still acceptable for scientist characters in 1985, the paleontologists in Jurassic Park were held to a much higher standard.
In 2008, the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine, having long taken note of the good and not-so-good portrayals of science and scientists in TV and film, set up the Science & Entertainment Exchange, a hotline that connects producers and screenwriters to scientists.
White’s blue meth business is also a reminder that while the overall framing of scientists on TV might have shifted toward the heroic, we can’t help but notice that Walter White is still a villain.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Best Hike in Every State”

It’s a little touristy by Alaska standards, and there are definitely more-secluded hikes in the state, but the 8.2-mile Harding Icefield Trail, in Kenai Fjords National Park, is still the best bang for your buck.
If you can handle 21 miles with 5,700 feet of vertical gain and 4,700 feet of loss, hiking rim-to-rim via the Grand Canyon’s South and North Kaibab trails is the best way to see the big ditch on foot.
The hike from the Kalalau trailhead at Kauai’s Ke’e Beach to the waterfall pool at the end of Hanakapiai Valley is safer and far more achievable than doing the whole Kalalau Trail, but you still get the beyond-spectacular views of the Na Pali coast and a dip beneath a 300-foot waterfall.
Even out west, you’d be hard-pressed to find 100 miles of trail that’s uninterrupted by towns and other human-built intrusions, but the Pine Tree State preserves exactly that: The famed 100-Mile Wilderness section of Maine’s Appalachian Trail plumbs fir forests so dark and dense, they unnerved even Henry David Thoreau.
Hop on the Appalachian Trail at South Mountain State Park and hike about 2.5 miles to Annapolis Rocks for sweeping views of northwest Maryland.
Weekenders can nab the choicest 20-mile segment by starting at Talimena State Park, the trail’s western terminus, and hiking east over steep, rocky terrain that ranks as the trail’s toughest but rewards hikers with expansive views.
Panoramas across the bucolic Delaware River Valley are reason enough to hike the Tumbling Waters Trail, a three-mile loop in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, but the trail also passes a delightful two-tiered waterfall surrounded by black birches.
From Sylvan Lake in the Black Hills’ Custer State Park, hike four miles east on Trail 9S to Black Elk’s granite summit and its medieval-looking stone fire tower.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 30,000-Foot View”

The Panopticon is an architecture of scrutiny that gets internalized in people’s minds; the 30,000-foot view is about a distinctly privileged perspective.
If you look up in the sky, chances are that a set of contrails will soon come into view.
The 30,000-foot view summons a graspable, ordinary vantage point – at least in contemporary consumer society – to immediately rarify it.
In The Polymath: Unlocking the Power of Human Versatility, Waqas Ahmed quotes self-help guru Tim Ferriss, author of The Four-Hour Workweek: “Taking the 30,000-foot view helps you to look at the interrelatedness and interconnectedness of different fields as opposed to viewing them as purely separate disciplines.” Yet in Ferriss’s usage, the 30,000-foot view is not about knowledge for knowledge’s sake, but about calculation and speculation – about maximizing profit.
The perspective, too, is skewed, offering not a top-down view but an oblique and fragmented angle of perception, resulting in an indistinct tableau.
Given the illogical nature of the expression, why is “The view from 30,000 feet” still extolled? In part it reflects the collective, cultural investment in air travel as a pinnacle of modernity and as a class marker, most explicitly expressed in the “Status” of frequent flyers.
To claim the view from 30,000 feet is not about making an objective assessment so much as it is about proclaiming one’s net worth – and thus one’s ability to make respected decisions.
It’s not so much about seeing what’s out the window as it is about keeping the concept of “First class” coveted, even sacred – a true god’s-eye view.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Netflix says over 45 million accounts watched Bird Box”

Netflix announced on December 28 that more than 45 million accounts watched its Netflix original horror movie, Bird Box, in seven days, making it a record breaking debut for the streaming service – but considering Netflix rarely specifies what its data means, it was difficult to gauge what that number meant.
It’s also unclear from Netflix’s tweet how many people watched all of Bird Box or even half of the movie, before switching to something else.
A spokesperson for Netflix tells The Verge that the company only counts an account as having watched Bird Box “Once a view surpasses 70 percent of the total running time.” Furthermore, “Each ‘account’ may include multiple views and viewers but is only counted once,” the spokesperson added.
By this logic, that means at least 45 million people have watched at least 70 percent of Bird Box.
Considering that people may have watched Bird Box with friends or family, chances are that the total view count may be even higher than 45 million – especially given that Bird Box was released globally.
Netflix would not comment on where the majority of Bird Box’s viewers were geographically based.
There are still a number of questions Netflix wouldn’t address when asked by The Verge, including how 45 million account views in seven days compares to the last record holder.
A Netflix spokesperson added that specific data collection method is only applicable to Bird Box, not the rest of its content.

The orginal article.

Summary of “YouTubers are not your friends”

Against a quiet backdrop of autumnal ornaments and a roaring fireplace, YouTuber Charisma Star welcomes her audience with a familiar line: “Hey, my beautiful shining stars!” They respond eagerly in turn.
Ferchaud co-authored a paper last year – “Parasocial attributes and YouTube personalities: Exploring content trends across the most subscribed YouTube channels” – with an eye toward the most popular influencers.
These relationships are vital to YouTubers’ success, and they are what turns viewers into a loyal community.
Leslie Rasmussen, an assistant professor of communications at Xavier University, argues that while some YouTubers may not even be aware they’re cultivating parasocial relationships, the steps they take to grow their audiences are exactly that.
Because creators often earn money off their fans through memberships, Patreons, and other cash avenues, there are fans who feel entitled to specific details about the lives of creators or even specific content.
“Sometimes viewers will feel some sort of ownership over the creator and the content.” The divide between creators’ lives and their work is a fine line.
In the case of YouTubers like Charis Lincoln, it’s a tricky balancing act.
“Some YouTubers have talked about how they want to do things creatively but feel constrained to what the audience wants or feeling that frustration that the audience doesn’t necessarily want to see what they want to do,” says Ferchaud.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is Your Emotional Intelligence Authentic, or Self-Serving?”

Plenty of research has documented manipulative misuses of emotional intelligence – the intentionally subtle regulating of one’s emotions to engineer responses from others that might not be in their best interest.
The capacity to understand and share others’ feelings creates authentic connection and deepens trust.
Being attuned to the spoken and unspoken concerns of others demonstrates an openness to their views, a willingness to engage ideas different from ours, and honors the courage of others to express divergent perspectives.
Unaware of the tension between a genuine desire to take in others’ views and a need to be right, leaders can feign listening while actually trying to lure others to their side without realizing they’re doing it.
Keenly self-aware leaders detect how others experience them, actively solicit critical feedback from others, and accurately acknowledge their strengths and shortfalls.
Genuinely self-aware leaders face that insecurity head on, and don’t put the burden of soothing it on others.
Our ability to express emotional intelligence is sometimes impaired by unacknowledged, unhealthy, emotional needs.
If you want to genuinely employ effective emotional intelligence skills, pay attention to the unaddressed scars and voids lurking beneath the surface of your inner emotional landscape.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A philosopher says we shouldn’t blame people addicted to opioids for their choices”

Most of us have been trained to use more forgiving language when talking about addiction.
We tend to view addiction as a moral failure because we are in the grip of a simple but misleading answer to one of the oldest questions of philosophy: Do people always do what they think is best? In other words, do our actions always reflect our beliefs and values? When someone with addiction chooses to take drugs, does this show us what she truly cares about – or might something more complicated be going on?
We could give a similar Socratic rationale for punishing drug possession with decades in jail: If we make the consequences of using bad enough, people with addiction will finally realize that it’s better to be sober, the thought goes.
Is Socrates right? Or can we find a better, more sympathetic way of thinking about addiction?
The plight of addiction is that of having a powerful part of your mind push you relentlessly and automatically toward behaviors you do not actually want to do.
Many people manage to recover from addiction without the help of medication or even clinical intervention.
Given how hard it is to resist cravings of normal strength – just think of those bottomless chips – we should not blame someone with addiction for failing to overcome her neurobiologically enhanced cravings.
If the source of addiction is overly strong automatic cravings, then the most direct way to treat addiction would be to weaken or satiate these cravings in a non-damaging way.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A supermoon and total lunar eclipse will coincide for the first time in 152 years”

When you do, you will be treated to both a visible supermoon-what we call a full moon at its closest orbital point to Earth-and a total lunar eclipse.
During the eclipse, with totality visible from eastern Asia across the Pacific to western North America, the moon will slowly lose its brightness and take on a reddish hue because of the way the atmosphere bends the light, says NASA. As a result, totally eclipsed moons are sometimes also called “Blood moons.”
When can I see the supermoon and total lunar eclipse?
The best time to enjoy a supermoon is right after moonrise and before sunrise, when the moon is sitting on the horizon.
For the real highlight of the show, the lunar eclipse will begin at 6:48am ET and reach its maximum at 8:30am ET. Viewers from eastern Asia, the Pacific, and western North America will get the best view, but viewers in eastern North America and Europe will also catch a partial eclipse.
The Virtual Telescope project provides a livestream of the supermoon’s eclipse over Rome’s skyline, beginning at 6:30am ET. What’s the best way to photograph the lunar eclipse?
To take a picture of the supermoon or the lunar eclipse with a smartphone, tap on the moon on the screen and hold your finger in place to lock the camera’s focus.
Unlike the solar eclipse, the supermoon and the lunar eclipse are safe to view with the naked eye.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Google is losing allies across the political spectrum”

Republicans are still largely committed to a hands-off approach to economic regulation, Democrats are out of power, and Google still has plenty of allies in the Democratic Party.
The combination of Bernie Sanders-style populism on the left and Donald Trump-style populism on the right could lead to a future where Google faces hostility from policymakers across parties.
Conservative skepticism of Google goes back to the early years of the Obama administration.
Vaidhyanathan is generally a Google critic, but he found himself in the unusual position of defending Google against unfounded conspiracy theories.
Damore wrote a controversial memo suggesting that Google’s gender gap might be explained by women having less interest in or aptitude for software engineering, and the former employee argued that Google was becoming an “Ideological echo chamber” where right-of-center views weren’t welcome.
When Google terminated Damore, many conservatives argued that Google proved Damore’s point.
Conservative critics believed that Damore’s arguments should have been taken seriously within Google and that Google was essentially signalling that conservative viewpoints were not welcome at Mountain View.
While few conservatives have sympathy for Nazis, conservatives worry that similar reasoning could lead to censorship by Google and other technology giants of more mainstream speech.

The orginal article.