Summary of “What Do the Most GIF-able TV Shows Have In Common?”

According to the GIF-hosting site Giphy, this GIF of the character Patrick from SpongeBob SquarePants has been viewed over a billion times.
What is it about Patrick that makes him so eminently GIF-able? Giphy’s viewing data suggests that the most viewed of their TV channels in 2019 – the collections full of GIFs from individual TV shows – are from Saturday Night Live, SpongeBob, Fallon’s Tonight Show, Game of Thrones, Broad City, and The Bachelor.
The first part of the answer lies in how these GIFs get used, and the SpongeBob examples are prime illustrations of what makes a GIF effective.
If you’ve seen SpongeBob or if you haven’t, if you’re looking at the GIF while quickly scrolling through your feed, if you speak any language – those images will translate.
Looking up “Happy” on a GIF search engine is like looking up “Happy” in a thesaurus: You are presented with hundreds of variations, thousands of more specific ways of expressing the idea you’re trying to communicate.
Great GIF-worthy TV is especially accessible for being clipped and excerpted, so that its most dramatic reaction moments are set adrift from their original contexts and made to float freely among the vast GIF collections of various emotional states.
Once set loose, it’s incredibly easy for a GIF to be divorced from its original framing, forever severed from the ideas and characters and creators who made it.
After searching for half an hour, I still cannot tell you where precisely my beloved happy-faced-girl GIF comes from, although I suspect it’s Toddlers and Tiaras.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ice Poseidon’s Lucrative, Stressful Life as a Live Streamer”

Denino is twenty-three years old, and his job is broadcasting his life to thousands of obsessed viewers.
Denino is fanatical about making his live stream the best it can be.
If you watch his live stream, the word that most readily comes to mind is “Asshole.” Denino is keen to point out where he draws the line.
After consulting a random-name generator, Denino called his character Ice Poseidon.
Its prominence in Denino’s live stream can give the whole thing a dizzying ouroboros feel.
For the past six months, Denino had been struggling with fans over his girlfriend, a platinum-blond streamer named Caroline.
Its members have become fixated on the idea that the entire stream is fake; now, at the end of each broadcast, the subreddit fills with posts calling the action “Scripted.” Whether Denino can win back his viewers, as he has so often in the past, is the overarching question of the latest season of the Ice Poseidon show.
My favorite moment of Denino’s live stream is a small one.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Roseanne’ Revival’s Huge Debut Stuns Hollywood, Prompts Soul-Searching”

Roseanne made a triumphant return Tuesday night, blowing past projections with a 5.2 adults 18-49 rating and 18.2 million total viewers for the debut of its revival, which remarkably drew 10% more viewers than the original series finale 21 years ago.
Not surprisingly, the top TV markets where Roseanne delivered its highest ratings were in states handily carried by Trump in the election.
Roseanne delivered the highest demo rating for any comedy telecast in 3 1/2 years, since the fall 2014 season premiere of TV’s biggest comedy series of the past five years, The Big Bang Theory.
Somehow Roseanne transcended age, recruiting droves of young viewers for a show whose two leads, Roseanne Barr and John Goodman, are both 65, well outside of the 18-49 demo.
ABC did a major marketing campaign for Roseanne, including a three-day stunt during SXSW in Austin that drew huge crowds, and a tie-in with NASCAR, which is hugely popular in the flyover states.
Like Roseanne, Fox has a popular blue-collar sitcom in Married with Children, but its two stars, Ed O’Neill and Katey Sagal, are on other comedy series, ABC’s Modern Family and CBS’ Superior Donuts, respectively.
If Roseanne continues to be a ratings juggernaut, ABC, which is close to renewing the revival for a second season, should look into bringing back its other big blue-collar sitcom hit of the 1990s, Home Improvement, which starred another open Trump supporter, Tim Allen.
With The Middle is going away, there is a vacuum in representing middle-class families on broadcast TV, and the success of Roseanne no doubt will help get more blue-color sitcoms on the air.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How YouTubers Like Zoella Capitalize On The Self-Care Movement”

What is especially notable is how these videos intersect with young female YouTubers’ commercial interests and business ventures: Their channels are incredibly lucrative and often bankrolled by corporate partnerships.
Just as a young viewer might look to YouTube for advice on perfect eyeshadow application, they might now watch a video on how best to deal with their burgeoning anxiety disorder.
Those who have watched YouTubers for years develop a unique sense of affection for and personal investment in these personalities, which helps guard them against some criticism.
What Abby most appreciates in YouTubers are those “Who aren’t afraid to really be themselves… REAL people… who try to help others.” For Abby, who has watched YouTube with friends since her preteen years, it is when YouTubers become “Fake … unoriginal, and boring” that they are no longer worth watching.
A common refrain among viewers is that advertising in videos is reasonable as long as it’s not too overt – if the content and YouTuber still seem real enough.
A similar conceit runs through Nilsen’s video “How to Be Authentic + Stay True to Yourself.” With a background of tinkling piano music interspersed with artfully faded ocean and beach shots, Nilsen talks about how the viewer needs to “Let go of who you think you should be and step into who you really are.” She implores the viewer to ask themselves some key questions, such as “What makes you feel alive? It can be something as small as planting a garden.” But then, about halfway into the video, she suddenly, yet seamlessly, changes tack.
Now these beauty YouTubers are seamlessly adapting to new psychosocial trends, taking part in the emerging politics of the self.
As mental wellness and mental health are talked about more than ever before, YouTubers are at the forefront of the discussion, ready to talk about the stress epidemic with just the right bubble bath recommendation.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Hokusai: the Great Wave that swept the world”

Had Katsushika Hokusai died when he was struck by lightning at the age of 50 in 1810, he would be remembered as a popular artist of the ukiyo-e, or “Floating world” school of Japanese art, but hardly the great figure we know today.
His late blooming was spectacular – it was only in his 70s that he made his most celebrated print series, Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji, including the famous Great Wave, an image that subsequently swept over the world.
In their observation and invention they have been compared to Rembrandt and Van Gogh, and rightly so for the thrilling panorama they provide both of the world and of Hokusai’s imagination.
Hokusai gradually introduced colour into the series, delicate pinks and darker shadows, to show the illumination of the world as the sun creeps up over the horizon.
That the Great Wave became the best known print in the west was in large part due to Hokusai’s formative experience of European art.
I would love to see an impression of Hokusai’s delicately coloured print hung next to Géricault’s Raft of the Medusa, painted just over a decade previously, in which a similar large wave is about to crash down on frail humanity.
Hokusai signed his Thirty-Six Views with the name Iitsu, adding for clarification that he was “The former Hokusai”.
The drawings are brilliantly conceived, and the prints beautifully made, the woodblock carvers reproducing Hokusai’s line so accurately that we think we are looking at the drawings themselves, rather than carved and printed copies.

The orginal article.