Summary of “Leonardo da Vinci: How to See the World Like Nobody Else”

In late 2017, Salvator Mundi, one of Leonardo da Vinci’s paintings, sold for $450.3 million.
While it’s difficult to draw a definite conclusion about someone who lived more than 500 years ago, it does appear that da Vinci’s genius came more from experience than good fortune, as Walter Isaacson argues in his book.
It’s obvious looking at da Vinci’s contributions that he played at a similar intersection.
If you want to see the world for what it really is, then you have to observe without such bias.2.
Question the Mundane and the ObviousThere are 7,200 pages still left of da Vinci’s famous notebooks.
Many of these questions didn’t immediately add anything to da Vinci’s works of art, but they added to the richness with which he saw the world, and that richness contributed to the way he painted valleys and rivers, landscapes and mountains, and even bodies and smiles.
Given the quality of da Vinci’s painting, it’s perhaps no surprise that he was also conflicted by the need to produce only the best.
Leonardo da Vinci saw the world like nobody else, but the reason he did so was due to the choices he made in his interactions with it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The da Vinci Pause”

Last month, Walter Isaacson released his big new biography of Leonardo da Vinci.
In the meantime, I listened to Brett McKay’s sharp podcast interview with Isaacson.
“[Leonardo] da Vinci lived 500 years ago, Twitter didn’t exit, Instagram didn’t exist, all these digital things that are distracting us, that make it hard to really observe, didn’t exist.
So based on your research and writing on da Vinci: what can we learn from him about staying focused and observing intensely on things even in this crazy digital world that we live in?”.
Isaacson, who spent years immersed in over 7000 pages of da Vinci’s brilliant, but also scattered and frenetic notebooks, dismissed the premise: “Yeah, he had distractions too.”
“What he was able to do is pause, and put things aside, and look at very ordinary things and marvel at them.”
Technologies like the internet provide everyone the raw material to become a renaissance person, but to take advantage of this reality it helps to cultivate da Vinci’s ability to pause when something catches your attention, and to then give it the intense, deep concentration needed to transform a fleeting spark into something more substantial.
Her new book, Divine Time Management, tackles personal productivity through a novel lens: Christianity.

The orginal article.