Summary of “Leonardo da Vinci’s genius may be rooted in a common eye disorder, new study says”

For centuries, people have theorized about the source of Leonardo da Vinci’s artistic genius.
There is now evidence that da Vinci’s renowned capacity to reproduce the three-dimensional world in paintings may have been aided by an eye disorder that allowed him to see in both 2-D and 3-D, according to a study published Thursday in JAMA Ophthalmology, a peer-reviewed journal.
Da Vinci is believed to have had a condition called intermittent exotropia – commonly referred to as being “Walleyed” – a form of strabismus, eye misalignment that affects about 4 percent of the U.S. population.
In da Vinci’s case, the painter was, at times, able to control his wandering eye, which in turn provided him with an artistic advantage, Tyler said, noting that the ability to switch between the two perspectives meant that da Vinci would “Be very aware of the 3-D and 2-D depth cues and the difference between them.”
The pieces included Andrea del Verrocchio’s “David,” a bronze sculpture said to be a depiction of da Vinci as a youth, as well as da Vinci’s “Salvator Mundi,” which recently became the most expensive painting ever auctioned, selling for more than $450 million last year.
Measuring the relative positions of the pupils, irises and eyelids in each work, Tyler wrote in the study that da Vinci had “An exotropic tendency of approximately -10.3° when relaxed.”
Da Vinci would not be the first famous artist to have the disorder.
“What happens in some people is when they’re only using one eye. . . they develop other cues besides traditional depth perception to understand where things are in space, looking at color and shadow in a way that most of us who use both eyes at a time don’t really appreciate,” said Robbins, who is also the educational director at the Ratner Children’s Eye Center within the Shiley Eye Institute in La Jolla, Calif. But Robbins pointed out that there’s a “Caveat” in the research – the “Images are not 100 percent identifiable as being” da Vinci, she said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Leonardo Da Vinci’s To Do List”

Most people’s to-do lists are, almost by definition, pretty dull, filled with those quotidian little tasks that tend to slip out of our minds.
Da Vinci would carry around a notebook, where he would write and draw anything that moved him.
“It is useful,” Leonardo once wrote, to “Constantly observe, note, and consider.” Buried in one of these books, dating back to around the 1490s, is a to-do list.
While all of the list might not be immediately clear, remember that Da Vinci never intended for it to be read by web surfers 500 years in the future.
You can just feel Da Vinci’s voracious curiosity and intellectual restlessness.
Later to-do lists, dating around 1510, seemed to focus on Da Vinci’s growing fascination with anatomy.
You can see a page of Da Vinci’s notebook above but be warned.
Even if you are conversant in 16th century Italian, Da Vinci wrote everything in mirror script.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Leonardo da Vinci: How to See the World Like Nobody Else”

In late 2017, Salvator Mundi, one of Leonardo da Vinci’s paintings, sold for $450.3 million.
While it’s difficult to draw a definite conclusion about someone who lived more than 500 years ago, it does appear that da Vinci’s genius came more from experience than good fortune, as Walter Isaacson argues in his book.
It’s obvious looking at da Vinci’s contributions that he played at a similar intersection.
If you want to see the world for what it really is, then you have to observe without such bias.2.
Question the Mundane and the ObviousThere are 7,200 pages still left of da Vinci’s famous notebooks.
Many of these questions didn’t immediately add anything to da Vinci’s works of art, but they added to the richness with which he saw the world, and that richness contributed to the way he painted valleys and rivers, landscapes and mountains, and even bodies and smiles.
Given the quality of da Vinci’s painting, it’s perhaps no surprise that he was also conflicted by the need to produce only the best.
Leonardo da Vinci saw the world like nobody else, but the reason he did so was due to the choices he made in his interactions with it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The da Vinci Pause”

Last month, Walter Isaacson released his big new biography of Leonardo da Vinci.
In the meantime, I listened to Brett McKay’s sharp podcast interview with Isaacson.
“[Leonardo] da Vinci lived 500 years ago, Twitter didn’t exit, Instagram didn’t exist, all these digital things that are distracting us, that make it hard to really observe, didn’t exist.
So based on your research and writing on da Vinci: what can we learn from him about staying focused and observing intensely on things even in this crazy digital world that we live in?”.
Isaacson, who spent years immersed in over 7000 pages of da Vinci’s brilliant, but also scattered and frenetic notebooks, dismissed the premise: “Yeah, he had distractions too.”
“What he was able to do is pause, and put things aside, and look at very ordinary things and marvel at them.”
Technologies like the internet provide everyone the raw material to become a renaissance person, but to take advantage of this reality it helps to cultivate da Vinci’s ability to pause when something catches your attention, and to then give it the intense, deep concentration needed to transform a fleeting spark into something more substantial.
Her new book, Divine Time Management, tackles personal productivity through a novel lens: Christianity.

The orginal article.