Summary of “People Who Hear Voices in Their Head Can Also Pick Up on Hidden Speech”

Why some people hear voices where none is present has long been a psychological puzzle.
People hear them because their brains may be especially primed to pick up speech.
“And there’s an idea,” adds Alderson-Day, “That the people who hear voices might have brains that are a bit more primed to look for meaningful patterns in the environment around it particularly in unusual or ambiguous situations.”
To see if priming might play a role in hearing voices, Alderson-Day and his colleagues including researchers from University College London, and the University of Porto in Portugal, took two groups of people-those who claimed to hear voices but were otherwise mentally healthy and those who were also healthy but didn’t hear voices-and placed them into functional magnetic resonance imaging machines.
Over time, upon each appearance of light, people have a tendency to say they hear a tone even though there isn’t one.
This tendency, to hear the tone when none was present, was especially likely to happen to those who hear voices – whether or not they had psychosis.
“Quite often the very first time they might not realize that other people can’t hear the voice or the voices but over time what they might do is develop an explanation for themselves that makes sense of it,” says Alderson-Day.
Regardless, Alderson-Day wants those who think they hear voices to always seek help from a medical or mental health professional.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Real Reason the Sound of Your Own Voice Makes You Cringe”

Most of us have shuddered on hearing the sound of our own voice.
Not liking the sound of your own voice is so common that there’s a term for it: voice confrontation.
A common explanation often found in popular media is that because we normally hear our own voice while talking, we receive both sound transferred to our ears externally by air conduction and sound transferred internally through our bones.
Basically, the reasoning is that because our recorded voice does not sound how we expect it to, we don’t like it.
Dr Silke Paulmann, a psychologist at the University of Essex, says, “I would speculate that the fact that we sound more high-pitched than what we think we should leads us to cringe as it doesn’t meet our internal expectations; our voice plays a massive role in forming our identity and I guess no one likes to realise that you’re not really who you think you are.”
When their own voice was secretly mixed in with these samples, participants gave significantly higher ratings to their voice when they did not recognise it as their own.
Through their experiments, the late psychologists Phil Holzemann and Clyde Rousey concluded in 1966 that voice confrontation arises not only from a difference in expected frequency, but also a striking revelation that occurs upon the realisation of all that your voice conveys.
He stands by the Holzemann and Rousey studies, saying: “When we hear our isolated voice which is disembodied from the rest of our behaviour, we may go through the automatic process of evaluating our own voice in the way we routinely do with other people’s voices I think we then compare our own impressions of the voice to how other people must evaluate us socially, leading many people to be upset or dissatisfied with the way they sound because the impressions formed do not fit with social traits they wish to project.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Real Reason the Sound of Your Own Voice Makes You Cringe”

Most of us have shuddered on hearing the sound of our own voice.
Not liking the sound of your own voice is so common that there’s a term for it: voice confrontation.
A common explanation often found in popular media is that because we normally hear our own voice while talking, we receive both sound transferred to our ears externally by air conduction and sound transferred internally through our bones.
Basically, the reasoning is that because our recorded voice does not sound how we expect it to, we don’t like it.
Dr Silke Paulmann, a psychologist at the University of Essex, says, “I would speculate that the fact that we sound more high-pitched than what we think we should leads us to cringe as it doesn’t meet our internal expectations; our voice plays a massive role in forming our identity and I guess no one likes to realise that you’re not really who you think you are.”
When their own voice was secretly mixed in with these samples, participants gave significantly higher ratings to their voice when they did not recognise it as their own.
Through their experiments, the late psychologists Phil Holzemann and Clyde Rousey concluded in 1966 that voice confrontation arises not only from a difference in expected frequency, but also a striking revelation that occurs upon the realisation of all that your voice conveys.
He stands by the Holzemann and Rousey studies, saying: “When we hear our isolated voice which is disembodied from the rest of our behaviour, we may go through the automatic process of evaluating our own voice in the way we routinely do with other people’s voices I think we then compare our own impressions of the voice to how other people must evaluate us socially, leading many people to be upset or dissatisfied with the way they sound because the impressions formed do not fit with social traits they wish to project.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Alexa, Should We Trust You?”

Every so often weird glitches occur, like the time Alexa recorded a family’s private conversation without their having said the wake word and emailed the recording to an acquaintance on their contacts list.
Alexa alone already works with more than 20,000 smart-home devices representing more than 3,500 brands.
After my daughter-in-law posted on Instagram an adorable video of her 2-year-old son trying to get Alexa to play “You’re Welcome,” from the Moana soundtrack, I wrote to ask why she and my stepson had bought an Echo, given that they’re fairly strict about what they let their son play with.
In one howler that went viral on YouTube, a toddler lisps, “Lexa, play ‘Ticker Ticker’‚ÄČ”-presumably he wants to hear “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star.” Alexa replies, in her stilted monotone, “You want to hear a station for porn hot chicks, amateur girls” “No, no, no!” the child’s parents scream in the background.
Catrin Morris, a mother of two who lives in Washington, D.C., told me she announces on a weekly basis, “I’m going to throw Alexa into the trash.” She’s horrified at how her daughters bark insults at Alexa when she doesn’t do what they want, such as play the right song from The Book of Mormon.
Alexa needs to get better at grasping context before she can truly inspire trust.
If you tell Alexa you’re feeling depressed, she has been programmed to say, “I’m so sorry you are feeling that way. Please know that you’re not alone. There are people who can help you. You could try talking with a friend, or your doctor. You can also reach out to the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance at 1-800-826-3632 for more resources.”
Though virtual assistants are often compared to butlers, Al Lindsay, the vice president of Alexa engine software and a man with an old-school engineer’s military bearing, told me that he and his team had a different servant in mind.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Confessions of a Phony Telephone Psychic”

The same scenario ran through my mind: A woman stops me on the street, grabs my arm and starts calling me a crook, a fake, phony and heartless rogue.
It’s important to let your callers feel like you are the only person in the world who can help.
Most of the time, I just went over the same words, but there were some phone calls that even Ella, my alter ego, could not handle.
No one ever taught me how to deal with psychopathic callers who want to eliminate their own bloodline because of a bad dream.
“There is a woman who just called looking for her baby,” I said without even thinking about it.
“She is a regular caller and, in her shock, she called me for help instead of calling you. Please, call her in three to five minutes and ask her to give you all the details you may need to find her daughter.” The operator agreed.
“Honey, hang up. I see police calling you in a couple of minutes. They will help you find your little girl. My tarot cards sent a ball of energy and your wish will come true.” I hung up.
As some of my ex-colleagues have informed me, there are still callers who want to talk exclusively to me, and my ex-boss keeps telling my replacement that she has some very large shoes to fill.

The orginal article.

Summary of “And Finally Learned to Listen”

He had the upper hand in all of our conversations – he could simply raise his voice until I grew tired of shouting.
“Hi, sweetie!” My father’s voice – or something like it – warbled through the speaker.
His voice had been reduced to a Mickey Mouse falsetto.
As he slowly climbed back to health, the loss of his voice seemed like a minor, if unfortunate, change.
My father knew his voice was shot; he knew his roar had been reduced to a crackle.
He was finally feeling what it’s like to be talked over, ignored, silenced – something I, with my quieter feminine voice, had long learned to accept as a conversational price of admission.
The three of us went around in circles, my mother’s voice rising in frustration until she was nearly crying.
As his voice has settled, I’ve noticed old patterns creeping back in.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Do Stars Like Adele Keep Losing Their Voice?”

In the world of showbusiness, it was safer to be seen as a singer with a healthy young voice than as a one-time great with surgically repaired cords.
Several surgeons told me they estimate that vocal cord surgery has been performed on thousands of pop, rock and classical singers, as well as on theatre and stage musical stars.
According to Lisa Paglin, a former opera singer turned voice coach, Zeitels had simply found a temporary fix; in the not too distant future, Adele would once again be forced off the stage and back into the operating theatre.
One veteran teacher in Italy told me that female students in their early 20s who want to sing like Adele or a young Whitney Houston are the ones who come down with vocal nodules.
In the west, vocal abuse is surprisingly common in all professions that rely on the voice , from schoolteachers to opera singers.
Brilla, a dramatic soprano with a fearless air, first became obsessed with the fragility of the human voice more than 50 years ago, as a teenage opera singer growing up in Pennsylvania coal country.
The question remains: could Brilla and Paglin’s approach permanently cure an artist like Adele by teaching her to sing in a more natural way? Steven Zeitels is dismissive of such an approach, and quick to defend Adele and his other clients against the contention that bad technique is causing their vocal problems.
“What makes matters worse is that the ‘mechanics’ are still convinced that all there is to it is to keep operating, while the singers themselves still talk about air travel, drafts, allergies and ‘stress’. #elephantintheroom could be a good hashtag,” she wrote, referring to what is wrong, as she sees it, with how people are taught to sing in the first place.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Do Stars Like Adele Keep Losing Their Voice?”

In the world of showbusiness, it was safer to be seen as a singer with a healthy young voice than as a one-time great with surgically repaired cords.
Several surgeons told me they estimate that vocal cord surgery has been performed on thousands of pop, rock and classical singers, as well as on theatre and stage musical stars.
According to Lisa Paglin, a former opera singer turned voice coach, Zeitels had simply found a temporary fix; in the not too distant future, Adele would once again be forced off the stage and back into the operating theatre.
One veteran teacher in Italy told me that female students in their early 20s who want to sing like Adele or a young Whitney Houston are the ones who come down with vocal nodules.
In the west, vocal abuse is surprisingly common in all professions that rely on the voice , from schoolteachers to opera singers.
Brilla, a dramatic soprano with a fearless air, first became obsessed with the fragility of the human voice more than 50 years ago, as a teenage opera singer growing up in Pennsylvania coal country.
The question remains: could Brilla and Paglin’s approach permanently cure an artist like Adele by teaching her to sing in a more natural way? Steven Zeitels is dismissive of such an approach, and quick to defend Adele and his other clients against the contention that bad technique is causing their vocal problems.
“What makes matters worse is that the ‘mechanics’ are still convinced that all there is to it is to keep operating, while the singers themselves still talk about air travel, drafts, allergies and ‘stress’. #elephantintheroom could be a good hashtag,” she wrote, referring to what is wrong, as she sees it, with how people are taught to sing in the first place.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Mark Hamill Became Most Sought-After Villainous Voice in Hollywood”

At the end of shooting Child’s Play, Lars Klevberg wrote Mark Hamill a letter.
Luke Skywalker is far from the only memorable character Hamill has played.
Hamill is one of the best, most prolific voice actors in the world.
Post Star Wars, Hamill could no longer disappear into live-action roles.
Hamill has said that he told his agent that he’d be up for playing one of the comic’s lesser-known villains.
“In animation, there’s an anonymity involved,” Hamill told The AV Club in 2011.
Since the ’90s, Hamill has reprised his role as the Joker many times over in movies, TV shows, and video games.
If there’s anyone whose presence could convince you to leave your house to see the reboot in the theater, it’s Mark Hamill.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This AI-generated Joe Rogan fake has to be heard to be believed”

Artificial intelligence isn’t creating fake photos and videos – it can do fake voices, too.
Up until now, these voices have been noticeably stilted and robotic, but researchers from AI startup Dessa have created what is by far the most convincing voice clone we’ve ever heard – perfectly mimicking the sound of MMA-commentator-turned-podcaster Joe Rogan.
Listen to clips of Dessa’s AI Rogan below, or take a quiz on the company’s site to see if you can spot the difference between real Rogan and faux Rogan.
Rogan is probably the world’s most popular podcaster, and has recorded more than 1,300 episodes of The Joe Rogan Experience to date.
Speculating about whether or not we’re living in a computer simulation, or admiring the upper body strength of chimps – that’s all prime Rogan material.
Being able to convincingly fake someone’s voice has disturbing implications, too.
As Dessa’s engineers note in a blog post, malicious uses cases for fake voices include spam calls that impersonate your loved ones; using fake voices to bully or harass people; and creating misinformation through faked recordings of politicians.
Listening to AI Joe Rogan talk about chimps ripping your balls off is, strangely, only the beginning.

The orginal article.