Summary of “The Booming Japanese Rent-a-Friend Business”

As a man whose business involves becoming other people, Yuichi would know.
I sat down recently with Yuichi in a café on the outskirts of Tokyo, to discuss his business and what it means to be, in the words of his company motto, “More than real.”
Yuichi: In Japanese business culture, there is a situation where you have to visit a company and say I’m deeply sorry for what I did and just bow and bow.
Yuichi: Many women say, “I want to marry you.” I say, “You’re in love with an order form. It’s not me-it’s the acting that you love.” If I married her, I’d have to keep acting.
Morin: Why do you think this kind of business thrives in Japan specifically?
Morin: What do you predict for the future of your business?
Yuichi: Yes, the same name, and he wanted her to call him what his wife had. She called him Otōsan-it means father.
Yuichi: I believe that the world is always unfair, and my business exists because of that unfairness.

The orginal article.

Summary of “When Faced with Conflict, Try an Introspective Approach”

How is it that rational, good, understanding, kind, collaborative people like you and me can get so triggered by certain colleagues’ work performance that our minds race with how we want them to get out of our lives and work – in any way possible? We come up with long diatribes of the million and one reasons why they need to get their act together – or, better yet, disappear.
In my research and experience as a time management coach, and in my work developing my new book, Divine Time Management, I’ve discovered that people often jump to blaming others in conflict.
Ask yourself: Was something else going on in my life that had an impact on how I saw this event? Had something happened previously in this work relationship that affected how I saw this person? Am I tired, stressed, hungry, hot, or in any other way mentally, emotionally, spiritually, or physically not at my best? Identify any external factors at play, particularly those that might have nothing to do with your counterpart or conflict.
If you are feeling confident about the projects you’re working on, your relationships with people at work, and your overall team performance, someone dropping the ball on a few things may slightly annoy you but won’t infuriate you.
When you’re feeling uncertain about your projects, believe that people think badly of you at work, and are insecure about your team’s performance, one little slipup could send you over the edge.
Instead of calmly working with a coworker on improvements, you could end up lashing out at her or going behind her back to try to get rid of the problem.
The why shouldn’t be “Because you made me so mad that I wanted to spit,” but something like “When you turned in this report late, I ended up working until 1 AM and missed my son’s soccer game to meet the client deadline. For us to work together effectively, I need to receive reports on time from you.” Then move on to find a solution: “We’re a team, and I want us to work well together. Can you explain what happened, so we can work together on preventing this situation from happening in the future?”.
I’ve had times when the people I work with do change their approach, and other times when it’s become clear that they’re not the right fit for the job and need to move on.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jeff Bezos’ guide to life”

Jeff spent a summer repairing an old piece of Caterpillar construction equipment Pop had bought for $5000 – a huge discount because it was entirely broken.
Jeff distinctly remembers how from then on “His thumb grew butt hair”.
His boss told him it was a pretty good idea but that it was “a better idea for someone who didn’t have a good job.” Jeff took a few days, and decided “The best way to think about it was to project my life forward to age 80” and make the decision that “Minimized my regrets. You don’t want to be cataloguing your regrets.” And while you might feel remorse for things you did wrong, he said more often regrets stem from the “Path not taken” like loving someone but never telling them.
On his personal connection to the news and owning the Washington Post: Jeff says “Pop obsessively watched the Watergate hearings” in 1973.
On the need for space travel and his rocket company Blue Origin: “We have to go to space to save earth” Jeff says, noting “We kind of have to hurry.” Still, he believes Plan A and Plan B both need to be protecting the environment of Earth to keep it livable.
Jeff exhibited this resistance to multi-tasking early in life.
On how to establish work-life balance: “I like the phrase ‘work-life harmony'”, Jeff says.
On what defines you: “We all get to choose our life stories. It’s our choices that define us, not our gifts. You can only be proud of your choices” Jeff says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tech Goes to Washington – Stratechery by Ben Thompson”

Did you catch Feinstein in the background asking “Did he say 330 million?” with surprise in her voice? What might she have thought had it been noted that Facebook has 2 billion users! At that moment it was hard to see this hearing amounting to anything; the next Senator, Dick Durbin of Illinois, asked why Facebook didn’t, and I quote, “Hold the phone” when a Russian intelligence agency took out the ads.
A few Senators later Richard Blumenthal demanded Twitter determine how many people declined to vote after seeing tweets suggesting voters could text their choice, and that Facebook reveal whom may have taught the Russian intelligence agency how to do targeting; both requests are, quite obviously, unknowable by the companies in question.
“We do believe these tools are powerful, and yet we have a responsibility to make sure they’re not used to inflame division,” said Colin Stretch, Facebook’s general counsel.
What Kennedy surely realized – and what Stretch, apparently, did not – is that Facebook had already effectively answered Kennedy’s question: the very act of investigating the accounts used by Russian intelligence entailed doing the sort of sleuthing that Kennedy wanted Stretch to say was possible.
To be clear, Stretch made clear that Facebook did this because the accounts in question had been deemed inauthenetic; that removed all of the external legal, internal policy, and business model limitations that would prevent Facebook from doing such forensic work to an individual account.
To endeavor to stamp out inflammatory and divisive statements is, by definition, to exercise a degree of power that is clearly latent in Facebook et al, and clearly corrosive to the democratic process.
Befitting his background as a comedian, Franken has a knack for framing the question at hand in a way that is easy for laypeople to understand, and all but impossible for Facebook to answer.
The fact of the matter is that Facebook is more powerful than any entity we have seen before.

The orginal article.

Summary of “3 Things You Should Always Leave Out of Your Resume”

What points are necessary for a resume? originally appeared on Quora – the place to gain and share knowledge, empowering people to learn from others and better understand the world.
Email address Work history: For each of your roles, include the skill-set you LIKED doing and want to continue to do.
My resume has a “Value-add” section in which I list key accomplishments in my career and certifications.
You can also include top skills such as skills from the Strength Finder or technical skills if the role you are applying for is technical.
If you are applying for a job that you are transitioning careers into, you could consider writing a skills-based resume instead of a traditional resume.
A skills-based resume lists out your skills broadly and then your jobs/roles after.
Pro tip: convert your resume into a PDF before sending.
Don’t include references until you are asked by the employer.

The orginal article.

Summary of “It’s Your Fault People Always Misunderstand You”

If you’re not getting the results you want or if you’re having meeting after meeting and you’re not getting the response you want from your team, it’s time to look at how and what you’re communicating, says Matt Eventoff, owner of Princeton Public Speaking, an executive communication training firm, and the founder of The Oratory Project, which teaches executive communication skills to at-risk young adults.
Avoidance: People only approach you with questions or feedback when they absolutely need to do so, Eventoff says.
First, you need to take an honest look at how you communicate, Grenny says.
Are you thorough, clear, and factual in how you convey yourself? How consistent are you in how you communicate? And, do you involve all of the stakeholders so you can get different perspectives?
Look at how clear you make your expectations-and how open you are to understanding what others expect of you.
Asking curious, open-ended questions encourages dialogue instead of dictating what other people should do or think, Magosky says.
People need to know the outcome that you’re seeking or the result you want, Eventoff says.
Magosky says it’s important to remember that all people have good days and bad days.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Tiny House Hunters’ and the tiny American dream”

HGTV began airing episodes of Tiny House Hunters, where people pretend to look for a new tiny home and act like it is reasonable to live in a space with fewer than 400 square feet.
As the reality of tiny living sets in, the hunters often lament how tiny a tiny home actually is.
As is often the case on Tiny House Hunters, the single father had an impossibly small budget and wanted to find a home that was under 400 square feet and looked “Rustic.” Jim, the father, and his daughter looked at three different “Homes,” which is the script for the show, and settled on an ugly storage shed.
Shows like House Hunters and Tiny House Hunters flourish, in part, because even now, after the mortgage crisis and financial collapse, home ownership and the American dream are synonymous.
When one aspires to own a tiny home, they have a corresponding tiny American dream.
We don’t talk about how the American dream should not be grounded in material things like large homes or fancy cars rather than, say, single-payer health care, subsidized child care, or a robust Social Security system.
There are class implications in the nomenclature of tiny homes which are, not-so coincidentally, the same size or smaller than mobile homes.
There is a stigma attached to the mobile home, not merely because of its impermanence or questionable quality but because these homes reveal that sometimes, compromises must be made when it comes to the American dream.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jane Goodall’s Unparalleled Life, in Never-Before-Seen Footage”

I knew Geographic sent Hugo out to get what he could of the chimps but also to document me, and I wasn’t happy particularly, but I knew we needed to get that – I needed Geographic funding.
So if Hugo wanted to film me washing my hair, so be it.
It turns out to be one of the most favorite scenes in the film.
Were there moments when Hugo said, can you just move a little to the right?
What was the experience like of watching the film, especially the start of your romance with Hugo and then the dissolution of your marriage?
I actually hadn’t imagined that there could be anything new out of all that footage.
When the chimps were running away, I was terrified the money would run out.
Sometimes being a woman, there’s, you know , “Let’s have a little fling.” And will that compromise your success in achieving your goal? Maybe I was lucky, that it didn’t work out that way.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Parents are exhausting their children. An eighth-grade boy explains how.”

She is a parenting educator and best-selling author of books including “Queen Bees and Wannabes,” a look at high school social cliques that became the basis for the Tina Fey-written movie “Mean Girls.”
Wiseman sent this post after being struck by something an eighth-grade boy sent to her expressing his exhaustion from the pressure he said he feels from his parents to succeed.
While this scenario obviously doesn’t apply to all kids, it does to plenty of them, and Wiseman wants parents who see themselves in this to take note.
When you want to just relax for an hour after seven straight hours of strenuous cognitive exercises, and your parent tells you to get off your ass and start doing something productive, you want to throw something at them, to yell at them to simply leave you alone for one straight hour.
So you start to go and do whatever you want to do at the time.
When you walk past your parent, they say: “Where do you think you’re going? You still have chores.” Then they will hold up a long, long list of things that you have to do.
You move toward cover, so your parents won’t be able to see your hands curl into fists.
You finish everything, and again you walk past your parents.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Necessity of Questioning the Military”

“Let’s not let this maybe last thing that’s held sacred in our society, a young man, young woman, going out and giving his or her life for our country, let’s keep that sacred” he implored, lamenting the ugly and voyeuristic events of the past week.
Don’t question the military response, Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis said regarding the tragic ambush in Niger that left four soldiers dead. We can’t always tell you the numbers, he said earlier this month regarding the number of troops in Afghanistan, and, earlier in Iraq and Syria.
Nothing can rightly acknowledge or even measure the hole in their lives-no phone call or letter, not the benefits or life insurance provided by the Department of Defense, not even a personal $25,000 check offered to a grieving father.
Americans all want to honor and compensate the military; nothing is too good for our troops.
Bob Gates has written and spoken movingly about his nightly ritual of penning condolence letters while Secretary of Defense.
These letters may have provided some comfort to their recipients, but as Kelly pointed out, the most important calls and notes came from the friends and fellow servicemembers of their son.
Kelly’s decision to only accept questions from reporters who know Gold Star families was unsettling, later explained by a White House official: “What he wanted to convey is that this was a serious time, and attacks were being lobbed that were not factual or fair-from people unqualified to make them and who had not suffered.” Did he make a point? Yes.
I want to believe that he does not see military families as a problem he can keep quiet with a check.

The orginal article.