Summary of “Don’t Know What You Want? Improve These 7 Universal Skills”

What does success look like? What do you want from life? What career do you want?
We think it’s the worst thing in the world if you don’t know what you want to do in life.
One of the biggest thinking errors that I’ve made was that I thought I needed to know what I exactly wanted to do with my life.
The truth is that no one knows what they truly want.
So it’s not important to know exactly what you want to do with your life.
It’s not even realistic to boldly claim “I know what I want!”.
If you can’t decide what direction you want to go in life, that’s automatically your #1 goal in life – to figure out where you want to go.
Persuasion: Learn how to get what you want in an ethical way.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey: The Rolling Stone Interview – Rolling Stone”

Co-founded Twitter in 2006, he had no idea he and his colleagues were creating what would become a universally accessible, global, seamless, 24/7 platform for tens of thousands of people to yell at him.
In two interview sessions – one over dinner at New York’s Blue Ribbon Brasserie, where he brought his own bottle of organic, low-alcohol wine; the other in a glass-doored conference room in Twitter’s bustling San Francisco headquarters – Dorsey addressed those challenges, and talked about his life, work, career and ideas.
After Dorsey was cast out of Twitter in 2008, he co-founded Square, the now-multibillion-dollar mobile-payment company – and his old company eventually pulled him back in.
It’s a sign of how the stakes have changed for you and for Twitter that no matter what you tweet, a fairly standard response is “Yeah, but get the Nazis off Twitter.”Yeah.
We built Twitter originally because we wanted to use it, and we fell in love with it.
Do you yourself have any degree of Twitter addiction? Do you compulsively check Twitter the way many of the rest of us do?In context, I do.
After you were removed as Twitter CEO in 2008, you came back in 2011, after founding another huge company, Square.
Did you come away from Twitter to Square with a newfound world-conquering ambition?No, I don’t want to conquer the world.

The orginal article.

Summary of “”When in Doubt, Play Insane”: An Interview with Catherine O’Hara”

“Schitt’s Creek,” which was created by O’Hara’s longtime collaborator Eugene Levy and his son, Daniel Levy, both of whom also star in the show, is a modern-day reverse “Beverly Hillbillies”: the Rose family, once the millionaire owners of a successful video-store chain, lose everything when their business manager commits fraud.
It’s a classic city-mouse/country-mouse story, but O’Hara’s Moira, with her vainglorious flair for the dramatic and her peacocking wardrobe, elevates the show to a new level of ecstatic eccentricity.
O’Hara played the wicked stepmother Delia Deetz in Tim Burton’s “Beetlejuice” and then spent the nineties as part of Christopher Guest’s troupe of oddballs, starring in his absurdist, unscripted mockumentaries “Waiting for Guffman,” “Best in Show,” “A Mighty Wind,” and “For Your Consideration.” During our free-wheeling conversation, we discussed Moira Rose, the origins of her collaboration with Levy, and the one idea that Christopher Guest would not let her put on film.
After we all agreed we were going to do the show, I had lunch with Daniel and Eugene Levy, and I knew we were going to talk about what I was going to look like.
The night before we shot that scene in “Best in Show,” where I would fall, and then Gerry Fleck would have to take over handling the dog, we were talking about the logistics, and I asked Chris, I said, “Do you think I could do this?” I walked away from him like that.
How did you think about show business from that standpoint, living in L.A.?
There’s such a freedom in the way Chris works, because you improvise, and you get it on film; then he can use whatever he wants, and cut whatever he wants or throw out whatever he wants, but it’s there.
Eugene said, “You might want to run that by Chris before we shoot.” I go, “Well, he can say no afterwards, he can not use it….” And Eugene said, “No, I think you might want to….”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Words to Turn a Conversation Around”

Some of these words are surprising, and go against what we’ve been taught to believe.
From conversation analysts such as Stokoe to FBI negotiators and communication coaches, we’re learning which words are likely to placate or persuade us.
One of the first words Stokoe came across that seemed to have a magical effect on people was “Willing”.
Her evidence wasn’t scientific even so, “Just” is one of those words that has a habit of creeping into our emails and spoken conversations.
The word “Talk” seems to make a lot of people resistant to conversation.
“Anything else I can do for you?” Sounds like a perfectly reasonable question, doesn’t it? But John Heritage and Jeffrey Robinson, conversation analysts at the University of California, Los Angeles, looked at how doctors use the words “Any” and “Some” in their final interactions with patients.
A conversation expert, Kendall sits in on other people’s meetings as an observer.
“It’s about how you respond to people who are what we call ‘first movers’ – people who say something really critical, apropos of nothing.” It might be the work colleague who steams up to your desk with a complaint or the neighbour who launches into a rant about parking as you’re putting out the bins.

The orginal article.

Summary of “23 Smart Ways To Increase Your Confidence, Productivity, and Income”

To quote the famed Diana Ross, “You can’t just sit there and wait for people to give you that golden dream, you’ve got to get out there and make it happen for yourself.”
You need to give to the right people if you want your success and relationships to last.
Your standards for yourself, the world, and the people around you increase.
“Courage can be developed. But it cannot be nurtured in an environment that eliminates all risks, all difficulty, all dangers. It takes considerable courage to work in an environment in which one is compensated according to one’s performance. Most affluent people have courage. What evidence supports this statement? Most affluent people in America are either business owners or employees who are paid on an incentive basis.”- Dr. Thomas Stanley16.
Even after people have become paying customers, you should give them lots for free.
You build trust and community through SERVING PEOPLE. Transformational relationships begin with giving, not a transaction.
How can you give so much to these people that you completely change their lives for the better?
“There are only two ways to influence human behavior: you can manipulate it or you can inspire it.Very few people or companies can clearly articulate WHY they do WHAT they do. By WHY I mean your purpose, cause or belief - WHY does your company exist? WHY do you get out of bed every morning? And WHY should anyone care?People don’t buy WHAT you do, they buy WHY you do it.We are drawn to leaders and organizations that are good at communicating what they believe. Their ability to make us feel like we belong, to make us feel special, safe and not alone is part of what gives them the ability to inspire us.”22.

The orginal article.

Summary of “On the Experience of Entering a Bookstore in Your Forties”

There aren’t just books to read but books I’ve already read. Lives I’ve lived.
No one reads everything, nor even all the books they’d like to.
John Muir’s famous quote about ecology might as well have been about choosing what books to buy: “When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the Universe.” The bookstore is a liminal space.
Entering a bookstore now, at 44, with the benefit of hindsight, the choices I made as a young writer seem almost inevitable.
As luck would have it, the story of that half-year became my first published book, and the book helped me land a teaching job in Massachusetts.
There waiting in an inconspicuous bookstore in Concord, Massachusetts, in a glossy oversized coffee table book, was a glassy-green piece of my heart, a glimpse of a life I couldn’t get back.
As my father so eloquently reminded me last year when I mentioned I’d been shoveling snow: “Be careful, Bud: You’re in the heart-attack zone.” How many books do I have left to read?
How does reading evolve? Are books to us as leaves are to trees, feeding us while we hold them, then decomposing and feeding us again after we’ve let them go? I’m heartened by my elders.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘The Sopranos Sessions’ Book Excerpt: Go Inside Making of HBO Show – Rolling Stone”

DC: I changed agents, and I signed up at UTA. When I went in to meet them, they said, “What kind of ideas do you have?” I told them the idea that was The Sopranos and my agent said, “Forget that. It’s never going to happen. Not going to work.” But I pitched it as a movie then, and he said Mob movies were out of date, especially Mob comedies.
DC: Lorraine never said she didn’t want to play Carmela.
DC: I knew her as Margaret Pynchon , so when I saw her show up, I thought, “What the fuck is this?” [Laughs] Then she started, and that was it.
DC: No, because at that time I had no belief this thing was going to go anywhere but the pilot.
DC: Because if you push in on somebody it means, “This is important,” especially in TV. That’s why there were no music cues in the shrink’s office, because in a typical network TV show, when patients start to get down to business and reveal themselves about why he’s so happy or what the truth really is, they’d push in really slowly and you’d hear a synthesizer, you know? I hated that stuff.
DC: There were things Tony did that really offended her.
DC: Right! So when HBO bought the show, I knew that we had to get to it sooner or later.
DC: No. MZS: Okay, because later on you do leave things unresolved.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Padma Lakshmi: ‘Top Chef’ Profile”

“I don’t expect you to love this,” Padma Lakshmi warns as she slides a red, plastic tray onto the Formica tabletop.
The temple started serving food over 20 years ago, but Lakshmi has been coming for puja ever since it first opened in 1977, when she was 6 years old.
Weeks ahead of our afternoon, Lakshmi laid out a constantly shifting itinerary of what and where we should eat; the temple was re-included after we had a smattering of chaat at Maharaja – North Indian snacks, or “Real stoner food” as Lakshmi calls it.
The entire food tour, with a driver and her assistant, Anthony, on hand, is a flex, and why not? Lakshmi has gamely played the role of culinary ambassador, a conduit between India and the West, for years.
In a New York Times review of the second season of Top Chef that still rankles her, Frank Bruni criticized her outfit changes and described her as such: “Padma Lakshmi, a.k.a. Mrs. Salman Rushdie, a model-turned-actress whose epicurean musings are less riveting than her sluggish, mouth-full-of-molasses style of speech and strenuously come-hither poses.” If the trope of the beautiful woman eating food sits uneasily it’s still one she’ll leverage.
Harvey Weinstein was “Another episode, in a long line of episodes.” Miramax Books published Lakshmi’s first two cookbooks – Easy Exotic and Tangy, Tart, Hot and Sweet – and he’s a presence throughout a 2007 profile of Lakshmi in Vanity Fair.
Before Lakshmi joined Top Chef, she had pitched Bravo a show that would feature conversations with interesting people around a dinner table, not unlike the ones she holds at her own home.
Bravo was developing Top Chef, and the network wanted her to host that instead. Lakshmi had a conflict on the first season and came aboard for the second.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Cute Aggression: Adorableness Overload Can Lead To Violent Urges”

Cute aggression is often baffling and embarrassing to the people who experience it.
Cute aggression was first described in 2015 by researchers at Yale University.
A cute aggressor herself, wanted to know what it looked like in the brain.
The more cute aggression a person felt, the more activity the scientists saw in the brain’s reward system.
The idea is that the appearance of these negative emotions helps people get control of the positive ones running amok.
“It could possibly be that somehow these expressions help us to just sort of get it out and come down off that baby high a little faster,” says Oriana Aragón, an assistant professor at Clemson University who was part of the Yale team that gave cute aggression its name.
“So people who, you know, want to pinch the babies cheeks and growl at the baby are also people who are more likely to cry at the wedding or cry when the baby’s born or have nervous laughter,” she says.
Aragon says she’s one of these people: “For me, puppies are just amazing and adorable and cute and I cannot resist them.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Robert De Niro Is Always Doing Something”

Did you know those people growing up in Greenwich Village?
What do you think about the idea that, even if “The Irishman” is given a theatrical release, probably a lot of people would see it on a small screen? Is that a trade-off for having it funded?
Did you ever have actress friends confide in you over the years about something that happened to them or some quid-pro-quo scenario that you, in hindsight, think, “Well, that might have been more widespread than I thought it was”?
Nothing too graphic, nothing that would warrant my saying, “Well, they shouldn’t have done that, let me say something about it.” Because people didn’t want to bring it up or they were embarrassed or they didn’t want to start something.
What I think of, automatically, is that somebody would do something where they use me as the get-to person in order to get what they want, or something like that.
People can infer things, but a lot of times people don’t like to talk about that too much to me, so I don’t hear it.
Then the other people follow the bully, and they might take the liberty to do something that they wouldn’t do if the bully set a good example.
People would ask me from time to time, “Where do you think Travis Bickle is now?” And I’d say, “That’s a good question.” And I remember asking Marty, “What do you think?” So he said, “Yeah, let’s ask Paul, let’s talk about it.” So we did, and Paul came up with something, but it never was quite-we never could get to something that we felt would be right.

The orginal article.