Summary of “Jeff Goldblum, in Conversation”

Jeff Goldblum has long been one of Hollywood’s most charmingly distinctive actors.
Does the Jeff Goldblum persona that exists on social media jibe with how you see yourself?Let’s you and me uncover the truth.
Is there ever any concern that the popularity of the Jeff Goldblum persona gets in the way of audiences believing fully in your characters? Or that it might lead to you getting typecast as yourself?We know actors – Daniel Day-Lewis, and I admire his approach greatly – who say, “When people see me onscreen I want to be entirely believed as some transformed character.” But no, I’m not worried about that.
Director] Taika Waititi, when we met at the Chateau Marmont before we started on Thor, said to me, “I want Jeff Goldblum in makeup in that role.” And I like to do that.
This little Jeff Goldblum row that I’m hoeing is still adventurous.
I’ve pestered people – there’ll be plenty of people you’ll come across who’ll say “Keep Jeff Goldblum away from me with the books,” because over the decades I’ve done a lot of recitations.
Goldblum has appeared on Fred Armisen and Carrie Brownstein’s IFC sketch-comedy show multiple times, playing the owner of an artisanal knot store and “The Pull-Out King” – the proprietor of a pull-out bed superstore.
Goldblum also has a sister, the acclaimed visual artist Pamela Goldblum.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Rachel Bloom Has a Lot to Say”

It’s been just two days since she arrived back in Los Angeles from the Tony Awards, where she served as the show’s backstage correspondent for the second consecutive year and found time to send off the perfect retort to an ill-conceived Neil Patrick Harris tweet.
Very recently, backstage in the dressing room of a Broadway show.
You’ve said, from the very beginning, that you pitched the show as a four-season arc.
How much does the show, as it exists now, line up with your original plan?
God, if we could show actual sex scenes yeah, I’m sure things would be different.
If we only had a half hour to do this show, I don’t know how much we could have done with other characters.
That’s really special, as opposed to an edgy Showtime show that would just be watched by the hipsters who are similar to the people making the show.
Which song would you use to introduce someone to the show?

The orginal article.

Summary of “To increase your emotional intelligence, develop these 10 qualities”

Write these thoughts out, analyze them and determine how you want to treat others in the same way you’d want to be treated.
Your “Antennae” are up to things you love, to wanting to grow and learn more.
The emotionally intelligent mind is able to discern between things that they need versus things that would be “Nice to have” that classify more aptly as wants.
We do not need those things to survive, but rather we want them based on our own personal desires or what we perceive to matter to society.
Emotionally intelligent people know the difference between these two things, and always establish needs prior to fulfilling wants.
If you want to increase your opportunities, improve your relationships and think clearly and constructively, you’re best positioned to maintain a positive attitude.
Their inspired leadership and passion, combined with their optimism, drives them to want to do best for themselves and others.
In the same way that we should be focused on our self-interest, we should also maintain a spirit of desire and hope for wanting to see the people around us succeed.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Live, According to Anthony Bourdain”

Over the course of his wildly prolific career, he taught us so much-about eating, about traveling, and about experiencing the world with an open mind and heart.
The Editors of MUNCHIES. “We are, after all, citizens of the world-a world filled with bacteria, some friendly, some not so friendly. Do we really want to travel in hermetically sealed popemobiles through the rural provinces of France, Mexico, and the Far East, eating only in Hard Rock Caf├ęs and McDonald’s? Or do we want to eat without fear, tearing into the local stew, the humble taqueria’s mystery meat, the sincerely offered gift of a lightly grilled fish head? I know what I want. I want it all. I want to try everything once.”
“The school counsellors always told my parents, ‘Anthony needs a controlled environment.’ That’s what the kitchen is. For an undisciplined, dysfunctional guy like me, it’s a world of absolutes. I like the regimentation. You either fuck up or you don’t. My mission in life is conquering fear. Back there I’m strong; out here, as a civilian, I’m the biggest fucking pussycat in the world. I can go to someone else’s restaurant as a customer and I’ll put up with the worst abominations and still tip the waiter 20 cents at the end of the meal.”
“The people who cook for you, clean up after you, open doors, drive you home-where do they go when the work day’s over? What do they eat?”.
“One constant, then and now, is my still ironclad ground rule regarding music both during and after work: In any kitchen where I am in control, there is a strict NO Billy Joel, NO Grateful Dead policy. If you are seen visibly enjoying either act, whether during or even after your working hours, you can clean out your locker now. You’re fired.”
“If you’re twenty-two, physically fit, hungry to learn and be better, I urge you to travel-as far and as widely as possible. Sleep on floors if you have to. Find out how other people live and eat and cook. Learn from them-wherever you go. Use every possible resource you have to work in the very best kitchens that will have you-however little they pay-and relentlessly harangue every possible connection, every great chef whose kitchen offers a glimmer of hope of acceptance Money borrowed at this point in your life so that you can afford to travel and gain work experience in really good kitchens will arguably be better invested than any student loan.”
“Everyone should be able to make an omelet. Egg cookery is as good a beginning as any, as it’s the first meal of the day, and because the process of learning to make an omelet is, I believe, not just a technique but a builder of character I have long believed that it is only right and appropriate that before one sleeps with someone, one should be able-if called upon to do so-to make them a proper omelet in the morning. Surely that kind of civility and selflessness would be both food manners and good for the wold. Perhaps omelet skills should be learned at the same time you learn to fuck.”
“We are clearly at a long overdue moment in history where everyone, good hearted or not, will HAVE to look at themselves, the part they played in the past, the things they’ve seen, ignored, accepted as normal, or simply missed-and consider what side of history they want to be on in the future.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Mo Salah Is Ready to Make the Whole World Smile”

In Liverpool, the fans follow Mohamed Salah when he bows in prayer.
“I don’t know why it happens or why it is happening, but it is something I think about.” I ask Salah about the way Egypt is changing because of him-how he has given young people a sports star to aspire to become-and he pauses.
“We’ll fight for the first. It’s a fighting mentality.”-Mo Salah to B/R Football, on returning from injury for Egypt’s first World Cup matchSalah is humble by nature, though he exudes a natural confidence that you might expect comes with the territory of being one of the greatest athletes in the world.
Still, Salah is thrilled and often surprised by the enthusiasm of the people who adore him.
A statement from the Egyptian national team, that its doctors expected Salah to recover in time for the country’s second match of the World Cup group stage, brought relief to millions.
A phone call with B/R may do more than that: “We’ll fight for the first,” Salah says.
Salah is aware of his celebrity throughout the world and is bold enough to want to push it further.
“I saw some YouTube of him-not just basketball, but when he’s talking-and I like him.” Salah insists that he wants to be the biggest player in the world.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What’s the best way to avoid regrets?”

How should you spend your life if you don’t want to end up filled with regret? The standard modern answer to this ancient question, often based on research by the psychologist Thomas Gilovich, is that we regret inaction more than action: not things we do, but things we fail to do.
Their new series of studies, which I found via the Research Digest blog, hinges on a distinction between what they call the “Ideal self”, the person you’d be if you fulfilled all your goals and ambitions, and the “Ought self”, the person you’d be if you met your obligations to others, and lived a morally upright life.
That’s not merely because everyone’s incredibly selfish, the researchers argue; it’s that we’re more likely to take action to repair ought-self failures, perhaps because they seem more urgent or shameful.
Gilovich and Davidai are appropriately reticent about deriving life advice from their research, but I’m not: these findings are a powerful argument for figuring out what you truly want from life and giving it a shot, even at the risk of others’ negative judgments.
That’s why I like the trick, with its roots in the work of Carl Jung, of flipping the question and asking not what you want from life, but what life wants from you.
When faced with a big life choice, just asking the question that way can be enough to cut through the noise, to the quiet place where you already know what to do.
Read this: contrary to stereotype, philosophers these days tend to avoid pondering the meaning of life.
In his 2015 book A Significant Life, Todd May bucks the trend.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Make A Counter-Proposal?”

Whether responding using text communication or verbally, there are 3 things you always want to keep top of mind.
You want the other side to feel compelled to respond to you.
You don’t want them responding because they feel they must, just falling into the social norm of “They said something, so I should speak now.” Entering the interaction with the intention of verbalizing positives or negatives that will make them want to add their two cents is a good strategy.
One beautiful thing about silence and fundamental human nature is the power of the unspoken word.
Too much silence can be dangerous in text communication.
Weeks on end holding out to respond can be detrimental to relationship quality across the board.
Explaining how you have a better idea is a poor way to start that interaction.
Be careful not to disguise the things you hope they say yes to as a label, such as “It seems like you are interested.” If they haven’t agreed, a more appropriate verbalization is, “There seems to be something in the way that you don’t feel comfortable sharing.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jane Fonda: ‘I’m 80! I keep pinching myself. I can’t believe it!'”

Fonda isn’t even hugely interested in Cannes these days, not like back in the day “When people wore their own clothes and went there to talk about movies”.
If Book Club is a sort of geriatric Sex and the City, then Fonda plays the Samantha character, a leopardskin-clad businesswoman who schedules sex and won’t commit.
Jane Fonda was born in 1937, the daughter of the actor Henry Fonda, and while her life was socially privileged, her home life was agony, and her mother, Frances Ford Seymour, killed herself in a psychiatric hospital.
Fonda wants to produce a new version of the film, with younger actors, who now find their work life even more precarious on zero-hours contracts.
I have to say it: Jane Fonda looks stunning, immaculately coiffed and made up, and with the poise and elegance that has always been hers.
In the States, there are still people who boycott Jane Fonda’s films because of how deeply involved she got in protesting against the Vietnam war.
Having been married several times and lived with various partners, and recently split up with her last boyfriend, the music producer Richard Perry, Fonda now lives in a gated retirement enclave with her own house, but a shared community centre with a pool and tennis courts “Where I always see one or two other residents who seem infinitely older than I am, but they probably aren’t. I never thought I would ever live there, but it’s great.”
Fonda is unimpressed by the romance in many modern films.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie Comes to Terms with Global Fame”

Around the time that Imasuen was getting yelled at by his mother, the author of “Purple Hibiscus,” Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, who is now regarded as one of the most vital and original novelists of her generation, was living in a poky apartment in Baltimore, writing the last sections of her second book.
Sitting in Baltimore, Chimamanda found that writing her Biafra novel was arousing in her a degree of obsessiveness that she had not experienced before.
To write the last part of the book, when the war was going very badly for Biafra, she didn’t want to be in Nigeria at all: she needed distance.
In 2007, a guy he knew, who had written a Kafkaesque novel about a Nigerian who wakes up white, told him that Chimamanda was holding a writing workshop that September, in Lagos.
Chimamanda had thought that one thing she could do with the success of “Half of a Yellow Sun” was bring together would-be writers and show them that they had skill enough to make a go of it.
She could never live somewhere like New York, where you were tripping over writers every time you turned around, writers in restaurants, writers in the supermarket, writers on the subway.
A young Yoruba writer, under the gravitational pull of “Purple Hibiscus” and “Half of a Yellow Sun,” had made her characters Igbo for years, in the way that Chimamanda, having read only English books as a child, had made her first characters apple-eating and white.
She had instantly recognized herself in the Ojiugo character in “Americanah,” and complained to Chimamanda that if she was going to write about her could she next time just use her name and make it official?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Technology is driving us to distraction”

If technology is for anything, it’s for helping us pursue these kinds of goals.
It’s the perspective that our screens and machines ought to help us circle back on again and again: because whatever we might choose to want, nobody chooses to want to regret.
We trust these technologies to be companion systems for our lives: we trust them to help us do the things we want to do, to become the people we want to be.
If you wanted to train all of society to be as impulsive and weak-willed as possible, how would you do it? One way would be to invent an impulsivity training device – let’s call it an iTrainer – that delivers an endless supply of informational rewards on demand.
You’d want to make it small enough to fit in a pocket or purse so people could carry it anywhere they went.
Then what if you wanted to take things even further? What if you wanted to make everyone even more distracted, angry, cynical – and even unsure of what, or how, to think? What if you wanted to troll everyone’s minds? You’d probably create an engine, a set of economic incentives, which would make it profitable for other people to produce and deliver these rewards – and, where possible, you’d make these the only incentives for doing so.
You don’t want just any rewards to get delivered – you want people to receive rewards that speak to their impulsive selves, rewards that are the best at punching the right buttons in their brains.
In the longer term they can make it harder for us to live the lives we want to live or, even worse, undermine fundamental capacities such as reflection and self-regulation, making it harder, in the words of philosopher Harry Frankfurt, to “Want what we want to want”.

The orginal article.