Summary of “11 Actors Who Asked for Their Characters to Be Killed Off”

Here are 11 actors who asked for their characters to be killed off.
Dean Norris // “Hank Schrader” on Breaking Bad While his character was a fan favorite, Dean Norris wanted Hank Schrader to be killed off in the middle of Breaking Bad’s final season.
Sophie Turner wants her Game of Thrones character Sansa Stark to be killed off before the series ends-because she wants her character to die in a memorable and shocking way.
Executive producers Damon Lindelof and Carlton Cuse weren’t happy to see him leave, but respected Akinnuoye-Agbaje’s wishes and killed off his character at the beginning of season three.
John Francis Daley // “Dr. Lance Sweets” on Bones Although he was a series regular, John Francis Daley’s Dr. Lance Sweets was killed off on Bones at the actor’s request.
At the end of season three, Stevens wanted to pursue a career on the stage and in movies-so Crawley was killed off in a car accident.
Apparently, Sigourney Weaver wanted to kill off Ripley because she didn’t want to keep playing the character in movies that sounded awful.
As a result, Knight asked to be written off the TV show, and Dr. O’Malley was subsequently hit by a bus.

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Summary of “Bowen Yang Profile: How the Saturday Night Live Star Is Making TV a Little Bit Weirder”

Dad waited in the lobby while Bowen would visit with “Some quack,” and then father and son would make the drive back up I-25-which strangely enough “Became a fun bonding experience,” Bowen says, even if the therapy itself didn’t do all that much.
“Any distortion of what they saw as a normative sexual existence was so foreign to them that they were just trying to figure out how to make sure I was going to be okay,” says Bowen.
Notably around Bowen, the first Asian American person to join the cast provided you discount things like the one-fourth-Filipino part of Rob Schneider.
As the chaos swirled around them, Bowen tracked down Gillis’s contact info, opened up some space in his heart, and texted him something along the lines of: “Hey, this is all really crazy. Let me know if you want to talk.” Bowen didn’t hear anything that night.
Bowen had even gone to Pearl River Mart in Chinatown to get a few gifts for the rest of the crew.
“He deserves some level of progression out of this,” says Bowen.
“We both deserve to not live in this moment that was unfortunate for everybody for the rest of our careers.” Folks on the internet pitted Shane against Bowen when neither of them asked for it, inadvertently showing how tricky it is for a young artist burdened with being a “First”: You might be a product of your different overlapping identities, but you don’t want to be defined by any one of them.
Chris Gayomali is an articles editor at GQ. A version of this story originally appeared in the April 2020 issue with the title “Live From New York, It’s Bowen Yang.”.

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Summary of “A Super Strange True Love Story: My Disappearing FiancĂ©”

“It’s not going to work. Nothing’s ready.” I called him in a panic as soon as he woke up, in Canada.
“Listen. Getting married is the best idea we’ve ever had and we’re going to do it. It’s all going to work out. I promise.”
We met in Italy, fell in love and spent the summer of our lives on intense weeks together and long stretches apart: He worked on a photography project that took him to Alaska, Japan, Congo; I went to Kosovo, volunteering and looking for stories, then moved to Paris to complete a master’s.
His work took him there, too, and we spent a couple blissful months together.
We looked for a new place, and I cried like a spoiled child when faced with the reality that his priorities were different from mine – he wanted to save money on rent, and on everything really, to be able to invest in his work.
We didn’t have much money – I worked as the editor of a small online publication and had been supporting both of us on my Indian salary while his work was slow.
His assignments had always been sporadic, but a day of his work often paid ten of mine, and something always came through when our funds were nearly gone.
Infidelities and lies: a girlfriend hidden from me when we first got together, who he moved back in with after he left Paris; an older woman he had even thought he was in love with; adventures around the world as he traveled for work.

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Summary of “How to make money on TikTok, explained by a guy who does it”

Six months ago, very few people were making real money on TikTok, the video app and social network du jour for young creators and aspiring influencers.
That’s created an opportunity for the people who were already TikTok savants.
He’d already been big on Vine, the now-defunct six-second video app, and immediately went viral on TikTok with his signature highly produced “Prank” videos and collaborations with other famous former Viners.
I caught up with Sean at a TikToker meetup on the Santa Monica Pier in Los Angeles, a favorite filming spot among influencers, where we chatted about how celebrities use TikTok to coincide with global film releases, what it’s like to tell famous people to do silly TikTok dances, and why silly videos perform better.
TikTok reminded me of the Vines that I was making in 2014, when that used to be my full-time job.
Coming from last year, I wasn’t really on TikTok and I was a washed-up Viner and now I have knowledge of making content on the internet, but now I just do it for brands.
Between my two iPhones for work and my iPad, I’m on TikTok alone for four hours a day.
Record labels have their own traditional marketing, but if they could have their own TikTok wing, we could run campaigns for every song that gets released.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Hit Man Next Door: Did a Jersey Gymnastics Coach Kill for the Mob?”

If Passalaqua was a seasoned hit man, he was leading a surprising double life: as a former Olympic hopeful and 30-year owner of a family-friendly gymnastics center for youth tumbling teams and cheerleaders.
Holly Baumgartner, who began taking classes there at age five, recalls Passalaqua as a compassionate disciplinarian who comforted her when she fell with his adage “Progress, not perfection.” “He wasn’t just a coach to me,” she says.
The Jersey moms admired Passalaqua not only as a devoted coach, but as charming eye candy.
His oldest son, Joseph “Joey” Passalaqua IV, recounts fond memories growing up around the gymnastics club.
“My wife is on one StairMaster, my mistress is on another and my girlfriend is on the one next to her.” His son recalls passing his father’s Hummer on the highway – inside, a young woman was straddled over Passalaqua, having sex with him.
In 1989, Passalaqua claims, he became a made man in the presence of Gotti and Sammy “The Bull” Gravano.
Regardless of whether his Mob ties were real or imagined, Passalaqua fashioned himself as the ultimate Jersey hero.
Passalaqua ran on the Republican ticket for Middlesex Township Council, donated to Republican campaigns and framed a photo of himself with former New Jersey Gov. Christine Todd Whitman.

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Summary of “How Dating Became a ‘Market'”

In the modern era, it seems probable that the way people now shop online for goods-in virtual marketplaces, where they can easily filter out features they do and don’t want-has influenced the way people “Shop” for partners, especially on dating apps, which often allow that same kind of filtering.
The behavioral economics researcher and dating coach Logan Ury said in an interview that many single people she works with engage in what she calls “Relationshopping.”
“People, especially as they get older, really know their preferences. So they think that they know what they want,” Ury said-and retroactively added quotation marks around the words “Know what they want.” “Those are things like ‘I want a redhead who’s over 5’7”,’ or ‘I want a Jewish man who at least has a graduate degree.
Ury went on, there’s a fatal flaw in this logic: No one knows what they want so much as they believe they know what they want.
The fact that human-to-human matches are less predictable than consumer-to-good matches is just one problem with the market metaphor; another is that dating is not a one-time transaction.
Let’s say you’re on the market for a vacuum cleaner-another endeavor in which you might invest considerable time learning about and weighing your options, in search of the best fit for your needs.
In dating, especially in recent years, the point isn’t always exclusivity, permanence, or even the sort of long-term relationship one might have with a vacuum.
The marketplace metaphor also fails to account for what many daters know intuitively: that being on the market for a long time-or being off the market, and then back on, and then off again-can change how a person interacts with the marketplace.

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Summary of “Sleeplessness Is Making You Lonely, and Other People Are Suspicious”

Everyone knows how it feels to waste precious nighttime hours on Facebook and become too tired to interact with actual people the next day.
Sleep deprivation, it seems, can create a cycle of loneliness that only gets worse as individuals alienate the people around them.
The team wanted to characterize how social interactions change when people are sleep deprived: Do they reach out, eager for the comfort of a friend, or turn away and retreat to into their holes? “I think what’s counterintuitive is that when you lack sleep you might want more protection from society or be socially connected,” neuroscience post-doc Eti Ben-Simon, Ph.D., who co-authored the study with senior author Matthew Walker, Ph.D., tells Inverse.
Phase One: The Panic Button In the first part of the experiment, participants watched video clips of a stranger walking toward them with a “Neutral expression.” If the stranger got too close, they had the option to hit a “Panic button.” When people were sleep deprived, they hit the button earlier – in some cases 60 percent earlier than they did when they had slept through the night.
The Tables Turn To round out her experiment, Ben-Simon switched the scripts on her study participants by recruiting 1,000 new online participants to judge recordings of the original participants after they had pulled their all-nighters.
“If we think about that, we are maybe more suspicious of their social skills. I think we view loneliness as a social defeat, and you try to keep away.”
Sleep deprivation makes people withdraw from others because their brains tell them that others can’t be trusted.
Other people mistrust lonely individuals for withdrawing in the first place.

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Summary of “Russia’s Dr. Seuss”

One wants to know: Does Botswana have a Dr. Seuss? Does Thailand? ‘Cuz if they do, I need to know about it.
To take the kid’s mind off the horribleness, Chukovsky got him engrossed in some kind of collaborative improvisation game, rhyming like crazy around a story of a crocodile who comes to Saint Petersburg and eats a dog and then a cop or something there’s a war the crocodile runs around Chukovsky’s kid was just a teeny thing, but he knew inspiration when he saw it.
The book took off, zillions of little Russian torturers memorized the whole thing-I think it’s like three hundred lines-and Chukovsky started to get fan mail, and the publishers were instantly up his ass for more, more, more.
Just like with Dr. Seuss Chukovsky didn’t really have it “On tap.” He always said: When the internal weather was good, he could write a classic in one shot, and then another, the next day.
“Who’s speaking?” “Elephant.” “What do you want?” “Chocolate.” “For whom?” “For my son.” “Well how much should I send?” “Oh, no more than five or six tons. He can’t eat more than that. He’s still little.”
Herons, pigs-they all want stupid things that pigs and herons don’t really want.
“Hello, who’s there?”The Polar Bear.”What do you want?”I’m calling for the Elephant.”What does he want?”He wants a little.Peanut brittle.”Peanut brittle!And for whom?”It’s for his little.Elephant sons.”How much does he want?”Oh, five or six tons.Right now that’s all.That they can manage-they’re quite small.”
“Wee little mite”? “Elephone”? It’s probably enough to say Chukovsky would not have preserved the poem if it were awkward like that.

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Summary of “Learn How To Avoid Distraction In A World That Is Full Of It”

What Is Distraction and Why Is It Harmful? Let’s start with the definition of distraction.
Distraction is “The process of interrupting attention” and “a stimulus or task that draws attention away from the task of primary interest.”(1) In other words, distractions draw us away from what we want to do, whether it’s to accomplish a task at home or work, enjoy time with a loved one, or do something for ourselves.
If distraction becomes a habit, we are unable to sustain the focus required for creativity in our professional and personal lives.
In short, a distraction is any action that pulls us away from what we really want to do.
To start, you can change how you think about those bad feelings that can lead to distraction.
In addition to Bricker’s steps, there are several other tactics we can use to master the internal triggers that lead to distraction.
I discuss why distraction is often a symptom of a dysfunctional workplace, and how to fix it, in my book Indistractable: How to Control Your Attention and Choose Your Life.
The last technique for becoming indistractable is to make a “Precommitment”-removing a future choice-in order to overcome distraction.

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Summary of “Willpower Isn’t the Key to Success”

There’s a popular theory that willpower is like a muscle.
Like any other muscle, if you use willpower too often without any rest or recovery in between, eventually it fatigues and gives out-you eat the chips, skip the meditation, and check your notifications for the umpteenth time.
The problem that we all face living in the modern world is that it can feel like one constant exercise in flexing our willpower muscles.
One option to improve performance is to focus on strengthening your willpower.
Other research shows that regular exercise is also conducive to building willpower.
An equally powerful route to dealing with the willpower challenge is to eliminate the need for willpower altogether, to admit that you’re never going to have enough of it to live the kind of life you want to live.
Or at the very least, to admit that exerting willpower all the time is no fun and detracts from what you’re actually trying to do.
Perhaps a better option than always relying on willpower is to consciously design our environments to remove the temptations that regularly get in the way of us living our best lives.

The orginal article.