Summary of “How to Make a Phone Farm”

Joseph D’Alesandro, 20, made nearly $2,000 a month from phone farming back in 2017, he told Motherboard in a phone call.
An image of a phone farm uploaded to Mr. E Media’s Discord server, belonging to the user Goat City.
Even the modest income from a smaller phone farm can help out.
For many of the phone farmers Motherboard spoke to, building up their farm is also a hobby, not solely about generating cash.
HOW TO BECOME A PHONE FARMER. For Motherboard’s phone farm, we bought used devices off eBay: four TracFone ZTE Android phones for $24.99 each.
An image of a phone farm uploaded to Mr. E Media’s Discord server, belonging to the user Phen0m20.
Others probably don’t like the idea of their adverts falling onto the screens of a phone farm.
Netflix, the main subject of our phone farm test, did not respond to requests for comment on its stance around phone farms.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Toast to When Harry Met Sally, a Romantic Comedy for Grown-Ups”

My first memory of When Harry Met Sally is that I wasn’t allowed to watch it.
When Harry Met Sally’s unwholesome raciness-the faked orgasm, the f-bombs, the woman who meows in the throes of passion-featured prominently in the film’s marketing campaign.
I somehow saw The Killing Fields before I watched When Harry Met Sally; if you can’t guess from the title, The Killing Fields is a harrowing movie about genocide in Cambodia.
So what I first learned about When Harry Met Sally, besides its cast, was that Meg Ryan fakes an orgasm in the movie.
Someone had to explain the joke to me after an assembly in which a visiting lecturer made a joke about having a When Harry Met Sally moment to an auditorium full of middle schoolers.
When Harry Met Sally is a collection of finely hewn set pieces-nearly all of which pivot around nothing more than a conversation.
Writer Nora Ephron and director Rob Reiner used When Harry Met Sally as a canvas to explore heterosexual partnership, infusing the leads played by Ryan and Billy Crystal with facets of their respective personalities.
Crystal was the recipient of Reiner’s projections, creating in Harry a brooding jokester who prefers sports to feelings.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Giving Up TV For A Month Changed My Brain And My Life”

The average adult watches 2.8 hours per day of television, according to the American Time Use survey from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
The Dangers of TV A lot of research has been done around TV viewing and children, and Adam Lipson, a neurosurgeon with IGEA Brain & Spine, says one of the best studies is from Tohoku University in Japan.
Studies involving adults have tied television watching to Type 2 diabetes, depression, and even crime, adds Lipson.
“Many of the studies report adverse effects with television watching greater than one hour per day,” he says.
“There have been EEG studies that demonstrate that television watching converts the brain from beta wave activity to alpha waves, which are associated with a daydreaming state, and a reduced use of critical thinking skills.”
Television watching is a habit my husband and I started as kids; we both grew up spending “Family time” around programs like Love Boat and Fantasy Island.
It had been our routine to watch whatever is on TV after dinner, and suddenly we were both dumbstruck for ideas.
“If you work out for an hour, you can watch TV for an hour. Work out for two hours, and you can watch for two hours. Never watch more television than the amount of time you exercise.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Streaming TV is about to get very expensive”

The most watched show on US Netflix, by a huge margin, is the US version of The Office.
Even though the platform pumps out an absurd amount of original programming – 1,500 hours last year – it turns out that everyone just wants to watch a decade-old sitcom.
Things are just about manageable – if you have a TV licence, a Netflix subscription, an Amazon subscription and a Now TV subscription, you are pretty much covered – but things are about to take a turn for the worse.
The former Disney chairman Jeffrey Katzenberg is about to launch a platform called Quibi, releasing “Snackable” content from Steven Spielberg and others that is designed to be watched on your phone.
Watching television is about to get very, very expensive.
There’s a huge difference between not being able to watch everything because there’s too much choice and not being able to watch everything because you don’t have enough money.
Netflix didn’t become a monster because people wanted to watch a specific show; it became a monster because people wanted to watch everything.
When its streaming platform launched, people were spending more than £15 just to watch a single season of a show on DVD. So to be able to watch every season of a show – and every season of hundreds of others of shows – for a fiver a month was revolutionary.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Where The Algorithms Can’t Find You”

The site’s design is simple – a rectangular video embed floats in the middle of a black page and plays random YouTube videos that were uploaded straight from the camera, without an edit to the original file name.
Most of the videos that I’ve watched on the site have fewer than 10 or 15 views.
The video’s 34-second runtime leaves us no chance to process – “MOV 6092” begins to play, and we’re knee-high in a crop field watching what appears to be an industrial sprinkler sweep past the camera, a rainbow forming in its mist.
At first, YouTube’s users weren’t able to choose which video played next.
YouTube, which Google bought in 2006, announced last year that recommended videos account for more than 70 percent of the time people spend watching the site’s videos.
Tv shows videos with fewer than 500 views, and other sites have highlighted videos with unchanged filenames.
Tweaking the API call to target videos that were added to YouTube with their original filenames intact shifts the subject/object relationship.
YouTube’s original slogan was “Your Digital Video Repository,” a pricey commitment for a free website whose users now upload more than 80 years’ worth of content every day.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The fight for the bundle is the war for the future of TV”

For most people, watching TV meant buying a bundle of channels from a pay TV distributor like Comcast.
As the bundle breaks up, TV viewers will have more choice about what they watch and what they pay for, at least in the near term.
For years, the conventional wisdom about big TV was that the bundle wouldn’t budge.
For years, the conventional wisdom seemed correct: Even as TV viewing declined, the number of households paying for TV bundles remained constant.
A few months later, in August 2015, Disney CEO Bob Iger acknowledged that his ESPN network had suffered “Some subscriber losses” as pay TV customers cut the cord or looked for bundles that didn’t include ESPN. In case both of those events now seem like commonsense water-is-wet announcements, understand the context: Selling HBO a la carte over the web, was a major shift for Time Warner, which had traditionally relied on distributors like Comcast and Charter to market HBO to their customers, almost always by attaching the service to a bundle.
Now Disney, like every other big TV programmers, is facing a dilemma: How do they give customers the thing they want – the ability to pay for the shows or networks or packages of networks – while continuing to sell the things Disney would prefer they buy? The answer differs from network to network, but most of the solutions are some sort of half-measure: Find a way to make some stuff available outside the bundle while keeping most of the must-have stuff inside the bundle.
Interpreting TV distributors’ moves to bulk up their bundles isn’t a sign of strength for the bundle – it’s a sign of weakness.
This is scary stuff for the TV guys, which is why they are trying very hard to keep the bundle alive as long as they can: Picture the Winterfell defenders taking on the hordes this week, and the Hound’s moment of clarity: “You can’t fight death!”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Celtics, My Father, and Me”

Watching the Boston Celtics with my dad is one of my favorite pastimes.
My dad’s been bringing me to games since I was 10 years old, and we’ve enjoyed it all.
Cancer is killing the man who provided for our family, the friend who fostered my love for basketball, the dad who pushed me to dream big.
It’s an identity shift that supercharged my dad’s interest in the league beyond the Celtics.
Dad always hoped I’d get a chance to meet Heinsohn, the ancient Hall of Famer whom Celtics fans love and rivals loathe for his homerism.
After the long ride home, I filled them in: Mom was confident I’d get an opportunity, and Dad thought maybe soon I’d get to attend games as media.
My dad has said it pains him most that he won’t get to share the future with Mom and me-the friend in him wishes he could watch more basketball games with me, the fan in him wants to see me publish a book and develop on camera, and the father in him wants to simply be there for life’s highs and lows.
Garnett summed up the feeling every Celtics fan felt, shouting, “Anything is possible!” My dad and I both lost it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “When Did Pop Culture Become Homework?”

A concert movie with a live album tie-in – the biggest thing in culture that week, which I knew I was supposed to watch, not just as a critic, but as a human being.
What worse place is there to hide from the demands of pop culture than a show about drag queens, a set of performance artists whose vocabulary is almost entirely populated by celebrity references? In the third episode of the latest season, Vietnamese contestant Plastique Tiara is dragged for her uneven performance in a skit about Mariah Carey, and her response shocks the judges.
“I only found out about pop culture about, like, three years ago,” she says.
Essentialist pop culture does the same thing, flattening our imaginations until we are all tied together by little more than the same vocabulary.
“Although nationalism may be regrettable in some of its worldwide political effects, a mastery of national culture is essential to mastery of the standard language in every modern nation,” he explained, later adding, “Although everyone is literate in some local, regional, or ethnic culture, the connection between mainstream culture and the national written language justifies calling mainstream culture the basic culture of the nation.”
Their approach to high culture has of late seeped into low culture.
Pop culture, traditionally maligned, now overcompensates, essentializing certain pieces of popular art as additional indicators of the new cultural literacy.
With pop culture, the goal isn’t even that lofty.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Rereading Books and Rewatching Movies Is More Fun Than Expected”

Museums are a useful example for understanding O’Brien’s underlying finding about why the familiar may be more satisfying than people expect.
Perhaps it’s the case, O’Brien notes in the study, that some underrated satisfaction comes from already knowing a place well-maybe the museum’s collection felt overwhelming on the first visit, but manageable on the second.
O’Brien found stronger support for this second idea: People can underrate the novelty lurking within things they thought they’d already experienced fully.
In another experiment, O’Brien’s team had research subjects watch a movie on Netflix that they hadn’t seen before and thought they’d enjoy.
These discrepancies illustrate O’Brien’s finding well.
As O’Brien writes, “People may choose novelty not because they expect exceptionally positive reactions to the new option, but because they expect exceptionally dull reactions to the old option.” And sometimes, that expected dullness might be exaggerated.
“I think the biggest application of the finding is for people to spend more time considering why they prefer a novel option over a repeat option,” O’Brien wrote to me in an email.
“If my goal is to relax for a bit,” he wrote, “I’m more [likely] to consider spending that time jumping right in to something I know I already love, rather than waste half that window of time searching for something new.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Never mind killer robots-here are six real AI dangers to watch out for in 2019”

The past year showed that AI may cause all sorts of hazards long before that happens.
Six controversies from 2018 stand out as warnings that even the smartest AI algorithms can misbehave, or that carelessly applying them can have dire consequences.
Waymo, a subsidiary of Alphabet, has made the most progress; it rolled out the first fully autonomous taxi service in Arizona last year.
Last year, an AI peace movement took shape when Google employees learned that their employer was supplying technology to the US Air Force for classifying drone imagery.
Military use of AI is only gaining momentum and other companies, like Microsoft and Amazon, have shown no reservations about helping out.
What to watch out for in 2019: Although Pentagon spending on AI projects is increasing, activists hope a preemptive treaty banning autonomous weapons will emerge from a series of UN meetings slated for this year.
What to watch out for in 2019: Face recognition will spread to vehicles and webcams, and it will be used to track your emotions as well as your identity.
What to watch for in 2019: As deepfakes improve, people will probably start being duped by them this year.

The orginal article.