Summary of “The New Margaret Atwood Adaptation Explores The Real Horror Of Patriarchy”

Alias Grace, Netflix’s new six-episode adaptation of the novel by Margaret Atwood, opens in a way that’ll make you think you’re watching Masterpiece Theater: credits running over images of household objects and faded drawings, paired with a mournful violin score.
In The Handmaid’s Tale, Hulu’s recent Emmy-winning adaptation of another Atwood novel, patriarchy is stretched to a dystopian dimension, with fertile women made to serve as childbearing chattel for those in power.
Atwood first wrote about Grace Marks – who became a vivid fixture in the Canadian imaginary over the course of her trial – in The Journals of Susanna, a poetry collection published in 1970.
In 1997, Atwood returned to Grace Marks with Alias Grace, approaching her story through the plot device of a fictional doctor, newly enlightened by the nascent principles of psychology, attempting to determine whether or not Grace had indeed committed the murders or was subject to momentary insanity.
Alias Grace becomes a meditation on the way true crime narratives are formed, but it also explodes the existing narrative around Grace herself.
Without giving away any spoilers, it’s clear that Grace has sublimated the rage of living under patriarchy, but it’s unclear how, exactly, that manifested – and whether psychology is even equipped to understand the complex processes that occur over the course of decades of repressed trauma.
While it’s happenstance that Alias Grace willenter public consciousness amid an avalanche of allegations against men who have exploited their power to abuse, harass, or otherwise violate women, those allegations and Alias Grace are simply two different vantages of the same reality – in which patriarchy is never not in the process of finding ways to sustain itself.
As both Alias Grace and the specifics of recent stories from accusers make clear, men and women alike become ready accessories to interactions, relationships, and ideologies that keep patriarchy in place.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Many Strategies Fail Because They’re Not Actually Strategies”

Many strategy execution processes fail because the firm does not have something worth executing.
The strategy consultants come in, do their work, and document the new strategy in a PowerPoint presentation and a weighty report.
One major reason for the lack of action is that “New strategies” are often not strategies at all.
A real strategy involves a clear set of choices that define what the firm is going to do and what it’s not going to do.
Many strategies fail to get implemented, despite the ample efforts of hard-working people, because they do not represent a set of clear choices.
Others may represent a couple of the firm’s priorities and choices, but they do not form a coherent strategy when considered in conjunction.
Another reason many implementation efforts fail is that executives see it as a pure top-down, two-step process: “The strategy is made; now we implement it.” That’s unlikely to work.
Depending on your specific circumstances and strategy, this might involve taking on difficult clients or projects that fit your new strategy and that trigger learning throughout the firm.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Neuroscientist David Eagleman and composer Anthony Brandt explain how creativity works”

What makes humans special? Some credit should go to the opposable thumb and the larynx, says neuroscientist David Eagleman, but a lot of it has to do with our ability to be creative and constantly think up new ideas.
Eagleman, a professor at Stanford University and writer, collaborated with composer and Rice University professor Anthony Brandt to write The Runaway Species: How Human Creativity Remakes the World, published this month by Catapult.
Throughout the book, which is filled with photographs and illustrations, they narrow down and explain the three main components of creativity: bending elements, blending elements, and breaking.
The Verge spoke to Eagleman and Brandt about how these processes work, the relationship between creativity and quality, and their own favorite examples of creativity.
We had no interest in writing something about, you know, “Here’s advice on how to be creative,” in part because people are so different in what works for one person and what works for another.
What about taste, though? There are plenty of things, like performance art, that people will say is “Creative,” but they also say it’s bad. How should we evaluate? And how do we know how creative to be, or if it’s possible to be “Too” creative?
Brandt: We describe creativity as kind of a conversation between personal impulse and the community that sees it.
Eagleman: There is no way to know exactly how far out you need to be.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jane Goodall’s Unparalleled Life, in Never-Before-Seen Footage”

I knew Geographic sent Hugo out to get what he could of the chimps but also to document me, and I wasn’t happy particularly, but I knew we needed to get that – I needed Geographic funding.
So if Hugo wanted to film me washing my hair, so be it.
It turns out to be one of the most favorite scenes in the film.
Were there moments when Hugo said, can you just move a little to the right?
What was the experience like of watching the film, especially the start of your romance with Hugo and then the dissolution of your marriage?
I actually hadn’t imagined that there could be anything new out of all that footage.
When the chimps were running away, I was terrified the money would run out.
Sometimes being a woman, there’s, you know , “Let’s have a little fling.” And will that compromise your success in achieving your goal? Maybe I was lucky, that it didn’t work out that way.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Andrew Ng Has a Chatbot That Can Help with Depression”

It’s called Woebot, and it’s a Facebook chatbot developed by Stanford University researchers that offers interactive cognitive behavioral therapy.
“If you look at the societal need, as well as the ability of AI to help, I think that digital mental-health care checks all the boxes,” Ng says.
“If we can take a little bit of the insight and empathy and deliver that, at scale, in a chatbot, we could help millions of people.”
“Younger people are the worst served by our current systems,” says Alison Darcy, a clinical research psychologist who came up with the idea for Woebot while teaching at Stanford in July 2016.
In a study they published this year in a peer-reviewed medical journal, Woebot was found to reduce the symptoms of depression in students over the course of two weeks.
A chatbot might seem like a crude way to deliver therapy, especially given how clumsy many virtual helpers often are.
The very first chatbot, Eliza, developed at MIT in 1966 by Joseph Weizenbaum, was designed to mimic a “Rogerian psychologist.” Eliza used a few clever tricks to create the illusion of an intelligent conversation-for example, repeating answers back to a person or offering open-ended questions such as “In what way?” and “Can you think of a specific example?” Weizenbaum was amazed to find that people seemed to believe they were talking to a real therapist, and that some offered up very personal secrets.
“To the extent that the Woebot can replicate the way that a therapist can help explain concepts and facilitate trying out new coping skills, this approach may be even more helpful than working through a workbook,” says Michael Thase, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania and an expert on cognitive behavioral therapy.

The orginal article.

Summary of “7 signs you aren’t managing your time effectively”

Just because your calendar is full doesn’t mean that you’re an effective time manager.
Once you become an effective manager of your schedule you won’t just become a time and calendar boss.
Are you the type of person who is always late for appointments or missing important deadlines? It’s probably because you’ve either committed to too many tasks or you don’t have the ability to designate the right amount of time to your activities.
“Late people get stressed out from being late too, but they don’t strive to be early; they tend to time things to the minute.”
“You need to be proactive instead of reactive to your calendar. Schedule your time first and only then accept appropriate requests from others,’ suggests Craig Jarrow, the author of”.
“It’s a fact that even though it takes time to plan, you save more time by planning than when you don’t.
“it’s not time that is lacking, it is your ability to manage it effectively.
You don’t have the time to get your other things done.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Rewards of Being Your Ideal Self in Grand Theft Auto”

For the British artificial intelligence researcher and computer game designer Richard Bartle, the kaleidoscopic variety of human personality and interest is reflected in the video game arena.
Bartle’s research showed that, in general, people were consistent in these preferred ways of being in online video game worlds.
In online role-playing games, for example, players who assume the role of medics, keeping the rest of the team alive in battle will, Bartle found, tend to play the same role across games.
In a 2012 study, titled “The Ideal Self at Play: The Appeal of Video Games That Let You Be All You Can Be,” a team of five psychologists more closely examined the way in which players experiment with “Type” in video games.
“Humans are drawn to video and computer games because such games provide players with access to ideal aspects of themselves,” the authors concluded.
The crucial role of the designer in deciding the rules of how we can be in their game can be vividly seen in Undertale, a critically lauded roleplaying game from 2015 which subverted its genre by allowing players to befriend the game’s monsters, not just stab at them with swords.
The game’s creator, Toby Fox, is reticent to overstate to what degree a player’s choices in his game reveal their personality.
Enjoyment is not the primary motivation-“It is rather,” they wrote, “The result of satisfaction of basic needs.” Video game worlds provide us with places where we can act with impunity within the game’s reality.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Don’t press send The new rules for good writing in the 21st century”

I’ve been let off parking tickets by writing politely and apologetically to the council to explain the circumstances.
In London Fields, Martin Amis offered the best postcard-writing advice I’ve ever read: “The letter with the foreign postmark that tells of good weather, pleasant food and comfortable accommodation,” he warned, “Isn’t nearly as much fun to read, or to write, as the letter that tells of rotting chalets, dysentery and drizzle. Who else but Tolstoy has made happiness really swing on the page?”.
There is little that paralyses the average person more than writing a letter of condolence.
So digital writing is about getting and retaining attention.
A lot of style guides, with good reason, tell their readers to write Plain English.
Whatever you call it, the basic style for non-literary writing wants to put clarity, which usually means simplicity, first.
If you’re not writing “Little Gidding”, do it the other way.
The formally learned skills of reading and writing come from the informally learned skills of speaking and hearing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “An Appreciation of Tom Petty, Who Died Monday, at Sixty-Six”

“There was the way out. There was the way to do it,” he told the journalist Paul Zollo, for his book “Conversations with Tom Petty.”
The band released an eponymous début, “Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers,” in 1976.
All told, Petty released thirteen records with the Heartbreakers, three as a solo artist, two with the Traveling Wilburys, and two with a reboot of Mudcrutch.
I’m fairly certain Petty knew how it felt to be us.
Petty understood how to address the liminal, not-quite-discernible feelings that a person might experience in her lifetime.
I have, at various points in my life, cited Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers’ “Greatest Hits” as my favorite record of all time.
So today seems like as good a time as any to light a candle-light all the candles-and put on “Free Fallin’,” which opens “Full Moon Fever,” Petty’s remarkable solo début, from 1989.
Petty liked outlaws and fuck-ups, but he didn’t romanticize much.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What I Care About Is Important. What You Care About Is a ‘Distraction.'”

On the left an argument continues over whether “Identity politics” – or what many of us call our basic rights – are a distraction from “Economic issues,” which are framed as more pressing.
Calling something a distraction tells us more about the person making the accusation than about the thing itself.
Everything is a distraction now, depending on your aims.
In the weirdly denatured language of the news media, August’s total solar eclipse was notable in large part as a potentially lethal distraction for drivers.
It’s a sign of the times that we can hardly agree on what constitutes a distraction and what constitutes stuff-that-matters.
It’s an even bigger, more garish sign of the times that the debate itself is being conducted in bad faith.
The way we use the word “Distraction” now seems like the mirror image of the problem it wants to name.
It’s a word we use to dismiss everything besides what we want to focus on, a habit that leaves us even more blinkered and blinded than the distracted person, who is at least open to chance.

The orginal article.