Summary of “The smartphone app that can tell you’re depressed before you know it yourself”

There is something most of those people have in common: a smartphone.
Mindstrong Health is using a smartphone app to collect measures of people’s cognition and emotional health as indicated by how they use their phones.
With details gleaned from the app, Mindstrong says, a patient’s doctor or other care manager gets an alert when something may be amiss and can then check in with the patient by sending a message through the app.
Subjects went home with an app that measured the ways they touched their phone’s display, which Dagum hoped would be an unobtrusive way to log these same kinds of behavior on a smartphone.
Brain-disorder treatment has stalled in part because doctors simply don’t know that someone’s having trouble until it’s well advanced; Dagum believes Mindstrong can figure it out much sooner and keep an eye on it 24 hours a day.
In its current form, the Mindstrong app that patients see is fairly sparse.
“There are people who are high utilizers of health care and they’re not getting the benefits, so we’ve got to figure out some way to get them something that works better.” Actually predicting that a patient is headed toward a downward spiral is a harder task, but Dagum believes that having more people using the app over time will help cement patterns in the data.
About 1,500 of the 2,000 participants also let a Mindstrong keyboard app run on their smartphones to collect data about the ways they type and figure out how their cognition changes throughout the year.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Return of the Face”

One, from 1993, purports to show “The New Face of America,” which turns out to be a young woman’s face “Created by a computer from a mix of several races.” It suggests that America might breed its way out of a long history of racial exploitation if “We” all intermarry enough to make race no longer legible.
The 19th century, anticipating the way in which the mass would norm faces and expressions, worried that the craggy, unadorned, pre-photographic face was going extinct.
At a historic moment at which every face on earth may soon be subject to the algorithms of facial-recognition software, a moment at which AI can harness vast amounts of data to reduce every face to the same factors, their fear may well be realized.
Unlike today’s facial-recognition software, which links the features of your face retroactively to an entry in a database, their interest was predictive: provide the physiognomist with a face he has never encountered before and let him tell you what this person may do or have done.
Many of those who thought like him yearned for a return of the Kaiser, and when one face rose to the top of the heap in 1933, they welcomed him.
In 1930, the novelist Joseph Roth expressed his suspicion that it was precisely Hitler’s unremarkable face that made it attractive to his followers, commenting on “Hitler’s physiognomy, which has anticipated all the faces of all his voters, and in which each and every one of his voters can see themselves reflected as though in a mirror.” Hitler had the kind of normed face that photomontage could create.
Amid the sheer volume of Reck-Malleczewen’s ire and hatred for Hitler’s face, it’s easy to miss that he also had a sense of what the face of a legitimate ruler of Germany would have looked like.
At least some of that was calculation: why would people trained to rhapsodize over the bushy, craggy faces of the Hohenzollern Kaisers suddenly give their vote to a guy whose very face struck the philosopher Theodor W. Adorno as “a composite of King Kong and the suburban barber”? “An apparition with a face like this would have been disobeyed as soon as its mouth spoke an order,” Reck-Malleczewen fumed in his diary.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Growing Up in the Library”

My family lived in the suburbs of Cleveland, about a mile from the brick-faced Bertram Woods Branch of the Shaker Heights Public Library system.
The library might have been the first place that I was ever given independence.
Our visits were never long enough for me-the library was so bountiful.
Libraries might have become just a bookmark of memory more than an actual place, a way to call up an emotion of a moment that occurred long ago, something that was fused with “Mother” and “The past” in my mind.
We were so new to the city that we had to look up the address of the closest library, which turned out to be the Studio City branch.
Decades had passed, and I was two thousand miles away, but I felt as if I had been whisked back to that precise time and place, walking into the library with my mother.
On a library bookshelf, thought progresses in a way that is logical but also dumbfounding, mysterious, irresistible.
The writer Amadou Hampâté Bâ once said that, in Africa, when an old person dies, it is like a library has been burned.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 Psychological Strategies to Ease the Stress of Perfectionism”

Over the past year, I’ve become more aware than ever of how much unconscious stress I put on myself to be above average.
In part, this is because perfectionism creates stress, and when we are stressed we start to become more susceptible to cognitive biases.
Meeting the easier goals should fulfill your need to be in control and achieve, and working toward the more difficult goals will simply be a challenge to be creative, go above and beyond, and enjoy the uncertainty of things that are out of your control.
So I’m going to propose something more manageable: become friends with what you don’t love.
If you start to tell yourself that so-and-so’s life is better than yours or that he or she is more successful than you, that’s almost always a generalization.
What makes a life better? What does success mean? Are we talking about financial achievements? Free time? Deep relationships? Take a closer look at how success could be more effectively defined in your life.
All of the elements of my definition may not be relevant to anyone else, but because they are more fluid and flexible, and can grow with my personality, they prevent me from falling into the habit of perfectionism.
What experience have you had with perfectionism? Have you used any of these strategies to find more peace of mind? Let us know in the comments-we’d love to hear from you!

The orginal article.

Summary of “About time: why western philosophy can only teach us so much”

One of the great unexplained wonders of human history is that written philosophy first flowered entirely separately in different parts of the globe at more or less the same time.
All cultures have a sense of past, present and future, but for much of human history this has been underpinned by a more fundamental sense of time as cyclical.
When we imagine time as a line, we end up baffled: what happened before time began? How can a line go on without end? A circle allows us to visualise going backwards or forwards for ever, at no point coming up against an ultimate beginning or end.
Thinking of time cyclically especially made sense in premodern societies, where there were few innovations across generations and people lived very similar lives to those of their grandparents, their great-grandparents and going back many generations.
Many non-western traditions contain elements of cyclical thinking about time, perhaps most evident in classical Indian philosophy.
“One lives in a place more than in a time,” is how Stephen Muecke puts it in his book Ancient and Modern: Time, Culture and Indigenous Philosophy.
More important than the distinction between linear or cyclical time is whether time is separated from or intimately connected to place.
The tradition of western philosophy, in particular, has striven for a universality that glosses over differences of time and place.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Trick To Thinking Clearer and Better”

Diversifying Your Thinking PatternsEach of us face different challenges, at different times, in different ways, based both on our biology and our unique cultural upbringing.
We are all a product of the different thinking patterns that emerged as a result of our experience of interacting with reality.
These different thinking patterns are, in large part, what makes you, you; me, me.
Our subjective experience is limited and using it - and the thinking patterns that create it - as the baseline for understanding the world is a limited way to go through life, and it biases us in the wrong direction.
At its core, a thinking pattern is an implicit rule of thumb for the way we connect the different aspects of the reality around us.
Given the complexity of this reality, the more diverse our trained thinking patterns and the better refined the associated triggers, the more accurately we will be able to interact with the information around us.
Because thinking patterns emerge from the mental habit loops we form as a response to experience, the only way to diversify them is to seek out new and conflicting encounters, whether that be through books, unfamiliar environments, or even hypothetical thought-games.
Outside of extreme external circumstances, any time we are struggling to solve some problem or lacking a sense of satisfaction and meaning, it’s due to the fact that the current thinking patterns that we are using to interact with reality are not adequately suited for the job.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Deliberate Awfulness of Social Media”

So why hasn’t Sharpe done a runner, like Matt Damon lighting out for the territory? And why, more to the point, haven’t I? The obvious answer is that social media is an addiction.
The first argument in Jaron Lanier’s recent book, “Ten Arguments for Deleting Your Social Media Accounts Right Now,” is that the nexus of consumer technologies and submerged algorithms, which forms so large a part of contemporary reality, is deliberately engineered to get us hooked.
This toxic miasma of bad vibes-of masochistic pleasures-is not, in Lanier’s view, an epiphenomenon of social media, but rather the fuel on which it has been engineered to run.
Lanier has coined a term for this process: he calls it BUMMER, which stands for “Behaviours of Users Modified, and Made into an Empire for Rent.” In Lanier’s view, BUMMER is responsible, in whole or in part, for a disproportionate number of our contemporary ailments, from the election of Donald Trump to the late-career resurgence of measles due to online anti-vaccine paranoia.
Lanier argues, are peculiarly vulnerable to deliberate or incidental misinterpretation, because context can be applied to what you say after the fact.
“New Dark Age” is among the most unsettling and illuminating books I’ve read about the Internet, which is to say that it is among the most unsettling and illuminating books I’ve read about contemporary life.
Bridle doesn’t want to convince you to delete your social-media accounts, although you might be more likely to do so as a result of having read his book than Lanier’s.
Like Lanier’s book, though in a very different register, it risks presenting the Internet as both the manifestation and cause of all of our deepest problems.

The orginal article.

Summary of “School Days Start and End Too Early”

Buses were a way of getting kids to school amid new, pedestrian-unfriendly sprawl, but also of assuaging fears that walking to school alone was dangerous.
Which connects to the third common category of opposition to changing the school day: concerns about funding a longer day.
“More than half of states are funding their school systems at a lower level than they were in 2008.”.
As she outlined in a 2016 report, there are a few ways that schools could apply for federal funding to extend the school day under the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015.
At any rate, many parents already are paying for the fact that the school day ends before the workday, in the form of childcare or extracurriculars.
“We’re effectively asking parents right now to subsidize the school day,” Brown said.
Keep school days the usual length, and working parents are in a jam.
Make school days longer, and both students and teachers might dread the added time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ray Dalio’s new tips to survive the next market meltdown are grounded in these career secrets”

All Dalio wants is for people to try them on and see what fits, which led to his writing more than 550 pages of business, investing and life lessons in a book titled, simply, “Principles: Life and Work.”.
Since the medium is the message, Dalio wanted another way to reach people who likely would appreciate the book’s encouraging “You’ve got this” message, but frankly wouldn’t take the time to read it – that might mean you, career-minded 20-somethings just starting out in the working world.
If well-prepared people keep a Plan B, Dalio seems like a guy with a Plan Z. The YouTube animation is an open invitation to practice his uber-realistic world view – an East/West melding of values-based mindfulness with his trademark “Radical open-mindedness.” Or as Dalio puts it in Episode 1 of the animation: “Principles are smart ways for handling things that happen over and over again in similar situations.”
In the next segment, Dalio offers a secret to his success: a five-step process applied repeatedly to investing, management, and just getting through 24 hours.
Dalio the technician has to contend with Dalio the man, who, like everyone, fights bouts of fear, ego and emotional blind spots.
Dalio is asking folks to become just a little bit more honest, open-minded, and willing, and see what happens.
The thing to know about Dalio is that he wants you to be wealthy, but in more than monetary terms.
If as a result you become the next Jeff Bezos, or even the next Ray Dalio, good for you.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Chau Down: A Chicago Food Diary”

Because of all this, my most anticipated meal in Chicago didn’t come from a Michelin-starred tasting menu or one of the city’s staples, but from Goree, a Senegalese restaurant less than two years old in the Kenwood neighborhood of Chicago’s South Side.
Even the Puerto Rican tourism bureau’s restaurant section has recognized it more as a Chicago delicacy.
My first jibarito was from Jibaritos y Mas, a perpetually busy nook in Logan Square, where patient customers pack the walking space so densely that restaurant employees have to Tetris their way through crowds to deliver food to sit-down customers.
Norma told us that Grant Achatz, Chicago’s most celebrated chef and one of the most acclaimed chefs in the world, is a regular; Rick Bayless, who has a stable of influential Mexican restaurants in the city, hasn’t visited, though she’s heard murmurs that their humble restaurant is brought up at nearly every staff meeting.
Dove’s Luncheonette I resolved to visit one of the restaurants under Paul Kahan’s Chicago empire, and predictably landed at the one location where I could have a shot of mezcal for breakfast without any judgment.
All farm-to-table restaurants are subject to the whims of seasonality and the market, but one of the express goals of Smyth was to refine that relationship between restaurant and the providence of nature.
The restaurant has an exclusive partnership with a 20-acre farm in Bourbonnais, a village roughly an hour south of Chicago.
Parachute Parachute is a delightful restaurant and I’d love to talk about its delicate summer squash kimchi accented by sesame oil and strands of saffron, or its deeply satisfying fried soft-shell crab with black bean sauce, or its yellowtail poke made with young almonds and the late-summer cherries that seemed to be a popular ingredient in the city - but all I want to do is join the gospel of the restaurant’s most defining dish.

The orginal article.