Summary of “Ben Simmons Bursts His Own Bubble”

An NBA court is 94 feet wide and 50 feet tall, and at only 21 years old, Ben Simmons manipulates the geometry of his surroundings about as well as any player.
Basketball isn’t played in a vacuum, but Simmons does seem to operate in a physical bubble.
There will be at least 6 feet between Simmons and his closest defender on nearly every play he initiates.
A Martian catching an ESPN broadcast from outer space would wonder why Simmons is the only player in the NBA with an undetectable repulsion field.
On one play in Philadelphia’s blowout win over Minnesota on Saturday, Simmons just stopped.
No full-time point guard in NBA history has been as tall as Simmons.
There are 11 three-man units that allow fewer than 100 points per 100 possessions; seven of them are Sixers lineups, and six of them involve Simmons.
The way in which Simmons is defended is unlike all but one starting ball handler in the league, a player who had at one time exemplified the same joy that Simmons evokes today.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Myth Of Traveling Light”

Traveling light frees you up in small ways, like letting you wander into a pretty neighborhood and decide that, actually, that’s where you want to stay that night.
Of course, traveling light allows you to sanctimoniously drone on about the benefits of traveling light, as though it’s an indication of character strength instead of a personal choice – as though being willing to wear the same shirt for days without washing it is something to be smug about.
There’s definitely no traveling light with kids, who require snacks and strollers, distractions and diapers – or if there is, it requires a militancy or bravado beyond my limited comprehension.
Then traveling light is, at heart, about going solo.
The real trick to traveling light is more simple than any of that.
That’s the kind of traveling light I stayed in love with, even as I grew up and got jobs and started focusing on how to tease a fortnight’s worth of semi-professional outfits out of a carry-on instead. I still like to pretend I can cross the distance between the person I was and the person I became lightly, like it’s nothing at all, even though I feel it more than ever.
My parents had their own stints of traveling light, back before they had to heft the load of three children.
Traveling light had always appealed to me as the flipside of those long trips hauling heavy suitcases over oceans to visit friends and family.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Process Is U.S. Health Care’s Biggest Problem”

That’s why simply making a poor process electronic by implementing an electronic health record doesn’t lead to better quality or cost.
Health care technology is very effective when it is used to support a well-designed care process.
Examples of these systems include electronic alerts for medication interactions and reminders to ensure all steps in the care process for the pneumonia patient are followed.
There are two types of improvement systems needed to create a well-designed care process.
One is a improvement approach that brings members of an existing clinical team members together to improve an existing care process.
The second is an innovation process aimed at radically redesigning care.
One key process, screening the patient for health risks such as cancer and hypertension, resulted in over seven places in the EMR for the provider to look for relevant information.
Building the care process through careful understanding of what each process step delivers is critical.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How the Internet Breaks Your Brain”

New research from Pew found that 77 percent of Americans go online daily, but 26 percent claimed to be online “Almost constantly.” Reading this brought me back to one day a few months ago, when I went outside for a cigarette, bringing my phone and cocktail with me.
Feinberg, a HuffPost reporter, is a first ballot inductee for Extremely Online Hall of Fame.
“No matter what happens, he is so confident that he’s right and that he’s an intelligent person. And he’s acquired all these hordes of fans, so he starts performing for them even harder when they cheer him on.” In other words, Don Jr. is also the epitome of being Extremely Online.
Feinberg has broken a number of stories online, but does she feel that online has broken her brain in the process?”Absolutely,” she said.
Krang T. Nelson, an exceptionally prolific tweeter, says he has to keep a firewall between his online life and his real life, if only because most of his friends don’t suffer from the same internet brain worms that he does.
We think nothing of calling someone a piece of shit online 10 times a day.
If you spend all day online being an asshole, is it any wonder that you might start acting like one everywhere else?
What’s more important to me, being right online, or making a living?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jack White Cover Story: New Solo Album, Why White Stripes Won’t Reunite”

Based on the White Stripes’ six albums alone – not to mention the Raconteurs, the Dead Weather, his solo work and an endless series of productions – he’s more than earned a retroactive spot in the classic-rock canon.
Catholicism? There is a picture, somewhere, of a little Jack White, at that point still Jack Gillis, meeting Pope John Paul II. White certainly has a self-flagellatory bent: “I’m bleeding before the Lord,” he sings on “Seven Nation Army.” Is it related to being the seventh of seven sons, and 10th child overall, with parents who were a little too worn out from parenting to set too many restrictions for their youngest kid? Probably.
” The White Stripes, of course, were all about what White once called “The liberation of limiting yourself.” Though White stretched the boundaries over time, the band was, legendarily, built around a mere three elements: Jack’s voice, his guitar, and his ex-wife Meg’s oft-misunderstood, underrated, occasionally one-handed drumming.
White is hardly the first successful white bluesman, and his thoughts on the idea of cultural appropriation are careful and nuanced.
White has become a vocal fan of hip-hop, and does something that’s an awful lot like rapping on one of his new songs.
“I played guitar and then he rapped over it.” The fire-breathing riff of the new track “Over and Over and Over” dates back to the White Stripes, and White tried to record it multiple times over the years, including with Jay, who tried to give it the hook “Under my Ray-Bans.”.
White follows current music closely enough to have developed an amused contempt for DJ Khaled, especially after watching this year’s Grammys performance of “Wild Thoughts,” which draws heavily on Santana’s “Maria Maria.” “It’s just Santana’s song in its entirety,” says White, embarking on an extended sarcastic riff.
“I’m not telling people what to think about the White Stripes. They can think whatever they want about it. But there is a case to be made that in a lot of ways, the White Stripes is Jack White solo. In a lot of ways.” He says this very casually.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Annihilation and How the Movie Understands Depression”

The film centers on Lena, a steely yet clearly fractured biologist and professor with a past tenure in the Army, where she met her husband, Kane.
He’s withdrawn, changed in ways that frighten Lena even if she can’t discern exactly why.
After most of the team has been brutally killed, Josie and Lena get a moment of reprieve, looking out at the beautiful wildlife surrounding the home that became both their refuge and hell.
Josie’s acceptance of death further invites questions about how we heal from traumas and the possibility of becoming whole, which Lena’s arc perhaps gives answers to.
Lena, in many ways, is a culmination of what the other characters represent: a longing for death, an angry, self-destructive quality, the feeling that her body is no longer her own, and a curious embrace of sorrow and understanding of how it has reworked her.
The most affecting moment comes later, as Lena becomes embroiled in struggle with a shimmering, faceless creature that mirrors her movements, at one point literally being crushed by it.
I’ve gone back and forth between reading the scene as proving that this Lena isn’t the Lena we were introduced to at the beginning, and believing that it’s still her, just unnaturally changed by her time in Area X. This is partly due to Portman’s stellar performance as Lena.
As I think about Annihilation, I keep coming back to that ending – Lena being crushed by the physical embodiment of her self-destructive nature and depression, yet somehow escaping – at least a part of her has.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 Ways to Get Over Your Fear of Public Speaking”

Often, our fears take over and we imagine ourselves stumbling on the stairs, forgetting our lines, drawing a blank, or losing the audience.
If you find that fear inevitably gets in the way of your ability to speak in public, we have some good news for you.
You don’t have to overcome your fear in order to be a good public speaker.
Instead, it’s about having less fear – think of it as being fear-less.
Even with all of the experience we’ve had getting on a stage and facing a live audience, neither of us has ever found a way to get rid of the fear.
If you have 100 slides for a 30-minute talk, your fear of running out of time is quite real, and you need to cut some material.
The second column has the worst thing that could happen if that fear came true.
For Mark, it’s giving people new ways of thinking.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Black Panther and Marvel’s increasingly troubled relationship with America”

2, Spider-Man: Homecoming, Thor: Ragnarok, and Black Panther, with four more movies to come in 2018 and 2019 – the more complicated its relationship to power becomes, but only up to a point.
Another superhero movie was a smash hit in 2008: Iron Man, the beginning of Marvel’s entire cinematic universe and a movie about a man who realizes that his power has been used toward evil ends, so he decides to start using it toward good ones.
The long string of Batman movies from 1989 to 2012 were frequently criticized for having villains who outshone the movie’s hero, and for as good as Christopher Reeve’s Superman was, Gene Hackman’s Lex Luthor was having a lot more fun.
The Marvel movies couldn’t really do this because they seemed constantly uncomfortable with dissecting how their heroes, save maybe Captain America, were ultimately a little lacking in terms of moral clarity.
In a movie as good as The Avengers – still my favorite Marvel movie – the villains are literally a faceless, invading horde from outer space.
Something like the 2014 phase two movie Captain America: The Winter Soldier is interested in the idea that S.H.I.E.L.D. has caused more problems globally than it has solved, but it then contorts itself to suggest that this is because the organization has been infiltrated by literal Nazis.
The movie’s true villain was simply a puppet master, pulling strings to get Captain America and Iron Man to fight, because his life had been destroyed by the Avengers.
The movie spends most of its running time questioning whether Asgard itself, Thor’s home and the primary setting of much of the first two Thor movies, is worth preserving.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Free Speech and the Necessity of Discomfort”

Intelligent coverage requires intelligent readers, viewers and listeners.
In sum, we cannot be the keepers of what you might call liberal civilization – I’m using the word liberal in its broad, philosophical sense, not the narrowly American ideological one – if our readers have illiberal instincts, incurious minds, short attention spans and even shorter fuses.
Nate Silver, the Times’s former polling guru, said the article did “More to normalize neo-Nazism than anything I’ve read in long time.” An editor at The Washington Post accused us of producing “Long, glowing profiles of Nazis” when we should have focused on the “Victims of their ideologies.” The Times followed up with an explanatory, and somewhat apologetic, note from the national editor.
Just what do these readers think a newspaper is supposed to do?
How can we get our readers to understand that the purpose of The Times is not to be a tacit partner in the so-called Resistance, which would only validate the administration’s charge that the paper is engaged in veiled partisanship rather than straight-up fact-finding and truth telling?
Again, do these readers comprehend that we are in the business of news, not public relations? And does it not also occur to them that perhaps the real problem was coverage that was not aggressive enough, allowing Mrs. Clinton to dominate the Democratic field in 2016 despite her serious, and only belatedly apparent, shortcomings as a candidate?
The word “Modest” might have been a tip-off to modestly educated readers that I was not proposing to ban Jews at all.
How many people bother to read before they condemn? Are people genuinely offended, or are they looking for a pretext to be offended – because taking offense is now the shortest route to political empowerment? Am I, as a columnist, no longer allowed to use irony as a rhetorical device because there’s always a risk that bigots and dimwits might take it the wrong way? Can I rely on context to make my point clear, or must I write in fear that any sentence can be ripped out of context and pasted on Twitter to be used against me? Is a plodding, Pravda-like earnestness of tone and substance the only safe way going forward?

The orginal article.

Summary of “The History of Dice Reflects Beliefs in Fate and Chance”

Dice, in their standard six-sided form, seem like the simplest kind of device-almost a classic embodiment of chance.
Dice have been found all over Europe, says Jelmer Eerkens, an archaeologist at the University of California at Davis, who led the study.
The way Romans wrote about dice falls suggests they were regarded as signs of supernatural favor or of a player’s fortune, however.
Eerkens says, “Some of the non-symmetry that we see in the earlier dice might be a by-product that it wasn’t thought to be very important in the function of the dice-that it didn’t matter too much, because other things were controlling whether you would win or lose the game.”
Still, despite official disdain, by the 13th century, at least in some parts of Europe, people begin to write in a systematic way about why dice games work the way they do, as the dice themselves grow more and more uniform.
In the 17th century, even Galileo writes about why, in a game with three dice, the number 10 should come up more than the number 9.
The dice even switch back to the sevens configuration, a move that Eerkens suggests may have something to do with a growing sense that dice must be balanced, both physically and conceptually.
All these changes in dice come about, says Eerkens, “As different astronomers are coming up with new ideas about the world, and mathematicians are starting to understand numbers and probability.” Which came first: Did people begin to intuitively understand what true chance felt like, and adjusted dice accordingly, or did it trickle out from what would eventually become known as the scientific community? It isn’t clear, but to Eerkens, the story told by the dice is of a rising awareness of randomness.

The orginal article.