Summary of “Understanding Very, Very Smart People – Samuel Kohlenberg, LPC”

There may be people with high IQs who have an easy time in life; relationships are simple, work and school are a breeze, and they long ago addressed the existentialist questions that some of us might carry with us until the very end.
People with high IQs are outliers, and outliers are often a more difficult fit in many respects because the world is not made for them.
Learning to talk about how you are different without turning people off may mean that your needs actually start getting met.
For many gifted people, looking at a lamppost is a different experience than it is for the rest of the world.
People are less prepared for 6-year-olds in the midst of an existential crisis befitting a 40-year-old.
Learning to do well with people or with organizations that are a less than optimal fit can be amazingly important, and you may as well figure out how to do this sooner rather than later.
While finding optimal fit can be very important, learning how to work well with people who are different from you can be important too.
While this blog post may be of some help to those who know or who work with people with very high IQs, the real intended audience is adults who are too smart for their own good.

The orginal article.

Summary of “There’s Now a Name for the Micro Generation Born Between 1977-1983”

“Then we hit this technology revolution before we were maybe in that frazzled period of our life with kids and no time to learn anything new. We hit it where we could still adopt in a selective way the new technologies.”
If you’re getting all nostalgic reading this, chances are that you were born between 1977 and 1983.
It’s only seven years – not enough to count as a generation – but our experience is unique to us.
We were the last kids to make it all the way to grown up without pervasive technology.
We were the first twenty-somethings to learn how to use iPods and internet on our phones, how to text and online date.
We straddle a gap, exist between two worlds, and have, in some ways, lived two separate lives instead of one.
The idea is there’s this micro or in-between generation between the Gen X group – who we think of as the depressed flannelette-shirt-wearing, grunge-listening children that came after the Baby Boomers and the Millennials – who get described as optimistic, tech savvy and maybe a little bit too sure of themselves and too confident.
Of course, not everyone born during any generation fits into the mold – just most of us – and our experiences can vary due to gender, economics, race, culture, etc.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Box’s VP Engineering on Biohacks For A Better Career”

Tomas Barreto, VP of Engineering at Box, takes biohacking seriously.
Barreto draws a straight line between the biohacking work he’s done to not only a more thoughtful, healthier life but also the trajectory of his career.
He credits biohacking for giving him resilience and capacity, both of which he needed in spades to grow his subset of the engineering team from 5 to 130, from its early days through a high-profile IPO.There’s no section on LinkedIn for biohacking bona fides yet, but if there were, Barreto’s would be voluminous.
“One of the themes that emerged is what Duhigg calls the ‘internal locus of control.’ It’s the idea that, if you feel like you’re in control, your motivation will go up,” says Barreto, “I noticed this in my own career, especially over a decade at Box. Some of my most productive times didn’t necessarily correlate with my seniority.”
Barreto credits two principles in particular with giving him the stamina and energy to work better and push himself further.
One of Barreto’s favorite biohacks is the use of power poses.
Deep sleep varies from zero – some people aren’t getting any and don’t realize it – to 35% of total sleep time,” says Barreto.
It’s well worth investing the time to study and optimize your sleep, but Barreto does have one favorite hack that’s helpful for many: “If I had to give one starter tip that resonates with a lot of people – something people may not have tried yet – it’s not exposing yourself to blue light, which is emitted from your TV, computer or smartphone, before sleep.

The orginal article.

Summary of “10 questions that can dramatically change your life”

The quality of our questions determines the quality of our lives.
I didn’t realize it back then, but this was mostly because I wasn’t asking myself the right questions.
I finally got around understanding that the common trait of successful people in all walks of life is that they mastered the skill of asking really good questions.
What followed was a journey to collect the best questions that could help me get out of a funk, stretch me beyond my limitation, and think differently.
The following 10 questions have dramatically changed my life, the way we run our company, and it’s used by some of the most successful leaders today to break through any barriers that come their way.
The question I’ve been training myself to always ask is, “How can we simplify this?” In other words, “What would this look like if it were easy?” This question alone has saved us hundreds of hours hiring, and allowed us to double our business with half the staff required.
It’s a question that Peter Thiel encourages the people he advises to ask themselves to stretch their limitations and boundaries.
It’s always worth questioning whether the traditional approach is actually the best way or if it appears that way because everyone else is doing it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Language alters our experience of time”

She discovers the way the aliens talk about time gives them the power to see into the future – so as Banks learns their language, she also begins to see through time.
My new study – which I worked on with linguist Emanuel Bylund – shows that bilinguals do indeed think about time differently, depending on the language context in which they are estimating the duration of events.
The really cool thing about time is the way we actually experience it is in some ways up to our imagination and our language.
Because time is so abstract, the only way to talk about it is by using the terminology from another, more concrete domain of experience, namely that of space.
Our study showed that these language differences have psycho-physical effects in the bilingual mind: they alter the way the same individual experiences the passage of time depending on the language context they are operating in.
If two lines stretch to different lengths over the same time period, participants judge the shorter line to have travelled for less time than it actually did and the longer line to have travelled for more time than it actually did.
If two containers fill up to different levels over the same time period, participants judge the container with the smaller amount to have filled in less time than it actually did and vice versa.
The fact that bilinguals go between these different ways of estimating time effortlessly and unconsciously fits in with a growing body of evidence demonstrating the ease with which language can creep into our most basic senses, including our emotions, our visual perception and now it turns out, our sense of time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “An iPad Pro 10.5″ Not Review”

After playing with the new iPad Pro 10.5″ for a few days, I am convinced that it’s fairly impossible to do a detailed review of it in its current state.
Last year, Apple’s Tim Cook said that “We believe that iPad is the perfect expression of the future of computing.” This year, that claim seems more ideologically sound than ever.
So instead of a full review today, I’m going to talk about some of the marquee features of the iPad and how Apple was able to execute on them.
Basically, this looks as sharp as the 9.7-inch iPad Pro – just bigger.
The camera hardware is the exact same package as in an iPhone 7, which is to say it’s the first time that a front and rear camera on an iPad has been on par with iPhone and quite good at that.
I wrote this piece entirely on the iPad Pro; aside from the 103 degree fever I’m running at the moment, it was painless.
With the iPad Pro, especially when it’s armed with iOS 11, it’s beginning to feel possible to see Apple in this world.
The iPad is a full-fledged computer, and you can argue against it but you’re going to increasingly sound like a contrarian.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Sociology of the Smartphone”

In order to truly take the measure of these changes, we need to take a step or two back, to the very last historical moment in which we negotiated the world without smartphone in hand.
The contemporary smartphone bears very few, if any, dedicated controls: generally a power button, controls for audio volume, perhaps a switch with which to silence the device entirely, and a “Home” button that closes running applications and returns the user to the top level of the navigational hierarchy.
There is one final quality of the smartphone that is highly significant to its ability to mediate everyday experience: it is incomplete at time of purchase.
So the polluted streams, stillborn children and diagnoses of cancer, too, become part of the way in which the smartphone has transformed everyday life, at least for some of us.
The maps we see on the screen of a smartphone help us rebalance the terms of our engagement with complex, potentially confounding spatial networks, allowing newcomers and tourists alike to negotiate the megacity with all the canniness and aplomb of a lifelong resident.
The very first lesson of mapping on the smartphone is that the handset is primarily a tangible way of engaging something much subtler and harder to discern, on which we have suddenly become reliant and over which we have virtually no meaningful control.
Someone who is able to navigate the city in the way the smartphone allows them to will, by and large, enjoy more opportunities of every sort, an easier time availing themselves of the opportunities they are presented with, and more power to determine the terms of their engagement with everything around them than someone not so equipped- and not by a little way, but by a great deal.
There’s something of an ethical bind here, because if the smartphone is becoming a de facto necessity, it is at the same time impossible to use the device as intended without, in turn, surrendering data to it and the network beyond.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Language alters our experience of time”

She discovers the way the aliens talk about time gives them the power to see into the future – so as Banks learns their language, she also begins to see through time.
My new study – which I worked on with linguist Emanuel Bylund – shows that bilinguals do indeed think about time differently, depending on the language context in which they are estimating the duration of events.
The really cool thing about time is the way we actually experience it is in some ways up to our imagination and our language.
Because time is so abstract, the only way to talk about it is by using the terminology from another, more concrete domain of experience, namely that of space.
Our study showed that these language differences have psycho-physical effects in the bilingual mind: they alter the way the same individual experiences the passage of time depending on the language context they are operating in.
If two lines stretch to different lengths over the same time period, participants judge the shorter line to have travelled for less time than it actually did and the longer line to have travelled for more time than it actually did.
If two containers fill up to different levels over the same time period, participants judge the container with the smaller amount to have filled in less time than it actually did and vice versa.
The fact that bilinguals go between these different ways of estimating time effortlessly and unconsciously fits in with a growing body of evidence demonstrating the ease with which language can creep into our most basic senses, including our emotions, our visual perception and now it turns out, our sense of time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Neil deGrasse Tyson explains how to make anything accessible to anyone”

This year, at the Starmus festival for science and art held in Trondheim, Norway from June 18 to June 23, Tyson will be awarded the Stephen Hawking Medal for Science Communication for his work.
Last week, he withdrew the US from the Paris climate agreement while misinterpreting research from MIT. “This appetite is real, and I’m just part of the landscape in which it’s unfolding.” Tyson is still optimistic about the future of science communication in the country because he sees general interest all around him.
Quartz caught up with Tyson to talk to him about what makes an effective science communicator.
Neil deGrasse Tyson: I don’t think of what is important or not, I think of what needs or desires people have and I think of my energy and role as a servant of those needs and desires.
Then there’s the documentarians who are creating specials, whether that be a mini-series or just one off programs, and they need a talking head. Then there’s artists, who are lately being touched by science, and science is serving as their muse.
What do you think are some of the greatest challenges in reaching people when you talk about science?
Then there are the people who don’t know that they like science, and those people just need to reawaken some interest that they had long ago, but they’re not otherwise hostile to it.
If you’re one of these people who’s actively hostile to science, and now you see science framing and wrapping conversations that I’m having with someone you care deeply about-that could be transformative to you.

The orginal article.

Summary of “ways to dismiss technology”

If you can analyse whether a technology has a way to become something that works, can you also analyse whether it has a way to become something anyone would want?
First of all, it’s quite common, especially in enterprise technology, for something to propose a new way to solve an existing problem.
It can’t be used to solve the problem in the old way, so ‘it doesn’t work’, and proposes a new way, and so ‘no-one will want that’.
Now ask them again if they want an iPad. In the enterprise, new technology tends to solve existing problems in new ways.
You may in some underlying way ‘really’ be replacing an existing behavior in a different way, as Word replaced typewriters and email replaced Word, but that line of reasoning can easily lead you to unfalsifiable assertions when you move up Maslow’s Hierarchy.
One way to solve this problem is to try to separate the fundamental capability that’s being proposed from the specific uses.
The mistake to make in looking at Edison’s recording technology would have been to argue about whether people wanted sermons – the mistake is to look only at the application that this technology is proposed to provide, and not the actual capability that has been created.
If you focused on the application rather than the capability in this way, you’d have thought that the mobile opportunity was, say, 25% of the population of rich countries and that no-one else would want one, whereas in fact 99% of the adult population of Earth will have a mobile phone in the next couple of years.

The orginal article.