Summary of “Zoning Out in the Age of Netflix”

“Could you put something on in the background.” More than once in recent months, that’s been a request from my wife while she’s doing something around the house.
Said another way: I think a lot of people like cable simply because you can turn on the television and you always know that something will be on.
It’s simply turning the TV on and having something, anything, be on in the background.
I wonder if there’s a way for the newfangled streaming services to not only replicate this, but to replace it with something better.
Live content will start playing, but only in chicklet form, until you decide what you want to actually watch.
It’s more of an update in content and approach, not necessarily presentation.
I don’t necessarily have an answer here, but I do think this is something non-obvious that has been overlooked in our move to having endless content on demand at our fingertips.
Such devices are even better for music in this way these days, because you can just say something like “Play some 90s rock” and not worry about picking one song from all the music ever recorded.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Stay Married After Your Baby is Born, or, I’m not Divorced Yet”

Taking care of a child is so hard, so time consuming: it made sense that our emotions and needs would consume me and that in turn, three years later I would have a blank space for a lot of where Josh should be.
Sad, because it’s almost always, from other mothers I’ve talked to, true: that blank memory space for me, is partly blank because I expected the relationship I had with Josh to be on hold while I kept the baby alive.
Back in the earliest days of our relationship, when I was barely a known entity to Josh’s brother and parents, I felt uncomfortable but energized by their ability to make decisions quickly, where my family, the one we now had without my mother, sometimes took hours to decide what to have for dinner simply because everyone failed to speak their mind in a timely fashion.
“You’re all like your father!” my mother used to say in exasperation, years after my parents divorced.
Though Josh and I had taken on his personal characteristic of openly and sometimes hostilely attacking each other over, say, how good the films of Paul Thomas Anderson are, the stakes of so many of the arguments we’d had over the years before Zelda were extremely low.
At the time of the separation, with my oldest brother, David, already at college, we decided that my brothers and me would stay with my mother.
We wanted to stay with our mother too, because, well, she was the cool parent.
If we’d never had children, I believe Josh and I would probably never have been truly confronted with this need to learn how to make decisions together, how to relent or come to an agreement even if disagreement remains.

The orginal article.

Summary of “James Bridle on why technology is creating a new dark age”

There’s a couple of things I talk about regarding climate in the book, and one of them is to be really, really super direct about the actual threat of it, which is horrific, and it’s kind of so horrific that it’s difficult for us to think about.
Simply the act of articulating that – making it really, really clear, exploring some of the implications of it – that kind of realism is a super necessary act.
Which, again, we kind of don’t often do, particularly in the context of technology – where we see this stuff as a kind of ongoing, always upward unstoppable march.
Technology always walks this kind of weird knife edge.
At the same time, if you do manage to crack them open just a little bit, if you get some kind of understanding, everything suddenly becomes really quite starkly clear in ways that it wasn’t before.
I’m kind of insisting on that moment being the moment of possibility – not some kind of weird imaginary future point where it all becomes clear, but just these moments of doubt and uncertainty and retelling of different stories.
The really interesting science fiction to me now happens kind of in the next week or the next year at most because it’s so obvious to us how little we can predict about long-term futures, which really, for me, is more of a reflection of reality than reality is a reflection of science fiction.
There’s a whole genre of design fiction as well that posits these political things as design objects as a way to kind of pull those futures into being.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The extreme leadership that got the Thai soccer boys out of the cave alive”

The Washington Post spoke with Kolditz about the role of the boys’ coach, the five themes that define “In extremis” leaders, and what people most want to see from the people in charge when their life is on the line.
I did most of the research in Iraq, but I interviewed people who were climbing guides and took people up difficult climbs like Mount Everest, large formation skydiving organizers who put 300 to 400 people out of airplanes at the same time, and a woman who took HD video teams into the Indian tiger preserves and videoed tigers on the ground.
The way crisis leadership is usually studied is through the case study method, and so you’re studying people in ordinary companies who never really wanted to be in a crisis but found themselves there and either fixed it or didn’t.
The problem with that is you’re essentially studying crisis amateurs, and what I wanted to do was study crisis professionals – people who are in dangerous places all the time, and look at their techniques, their approaches to leadership, how they were different.
What people need is to be inspired that there is a way ahead that has positive outcomes for them.
The third thing we found was having “Shared risk.” People tend to trust leaders who have skin in the game, who also are occupying a similar level of risk.
The notion of competence needs to be just sweating out of those people.
One of the things we always argue to the people we are training as leaders is don’t think you’re going to adopt some leadership style.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I Watched ‘The Simpsons’ for the First Time Ever and I Couldn’t Stand It”

“I designed this course for a semester, and I really didn’t expect so many students to show up. But I had 500 the first year.” The class became so well known it was even recognized by Simpsons writers and featured in the episode “Little Girl in the Big Ten.”.
You might as well call me Frank Grimes, because I absolutely hate Homer, and couldn’t stand watching the show mostly due to his character.
In “Homer’s Enemy,” Marge cooks a nice lobster dinner so Homer can reconcile with Frank Grimes.
Through flashbacks, we learn that every time Marge is pregnant, Homer apparently gets so angry he rips his hair out.
Mr. Burns erects the sign “Don’t forget: you’re here forever,” which Homer covers in Maggie’s baby photos so that the sign reads “Do it for her.” Cue the “Awwws.” Because Homer had feelings about his own child for approximately three seconds on screen, it’s a touching episode.
In “Homer Badman,” when Homer goes to a candy convention, Marge is his candy mule.
A lot has been said about race in The Simpsons and 90s shows more broadly-I don’t need or want to dive into that here more than I already have.
If you love The Simpsons and the show is special to you, that’s great.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How language shapes our perception of reality”

Does an English speaker perceive reality differently from say, a Swahili speaker? Does language shape our thoughts and change the way we think? Maybe.
Some studies say that people don’t actually see color unless there is a word for it, but other studies have found that speakers of the Dani language can see the difference between yellow and red despite only having one word for them.
Because of the vocabulary, English speakers might organize things left to right, whereas a speaker of Guugu Yimithirr might orient them in a mirrored position.
The Hopi language doesn’t require past or present tense, but has validity markers, which requires speakers to think about how they came to know a piece of information.
One study conducted by Stanford researchers found that Spanish and Japanese speakers didn’t remember who is to blame for accidental events as much as those who speak English do.
English speakers get to the point in speech quicker than say, a Chinese speaker would, says Birner.
Tsedal Neeley, an associate professor at Harvard Business School, studied the company for five consecutive years after the mandate and discovered that employees who weren’t native Japanese speakers or English speakers proved to be the most effective workers in the end, even though they had it the roughest in the beginning.
If we believe that language shapes how we think, will learning a new language change the way you think? Probably not, says Birner, but if the newly acquired language is very different than the one you already speak, it might reveal a new way of looking at another culture.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Best Movies of 2018, So Far”

We’re six months into 2018, which means it’s time to take stock of everything we’ve seen so far this year-and determine which films released between January 1 and July 1 stand out most among the crowd.
Positioning an African superhero and his family and countrymen at the center of a big-budget spectacular, with a diverse array of talent behind the camera, Black Panther showed millions of people something they hadn’t seen before, an awfully late-arriving relief in a series that’s now 20-plus movies deep.
In exploring it, his movie offers one of the best recent analyses of what virulent racism, and how we tell the story of that racism, accomplishes.
It’s one of the most surprising films of the year-and, so far, the best.
What sets Let the Sunshine In apart from films of its ilk is the hot streak of intellectualism coursing through it: Denis has made a movie that’s as brutally concerned with how these people talk as it is with what they say, as focused on how desire manifests as on the fact that the desire is there to begin with.
The movie is docu-fiction; Zhao films it all with an airy alertness, combining scenes of the novice Jandreau “Acting” alongside scenes of him interacting with his own family and his own friends, one of whom is a paraplegic said, in the movie, to have been injured on the back of his horse.
So the movie is certainly not some pleasant distraction from the ills of the day-but Soderbergh’s calm, assured style is slick and winding enough to keep us more than engaged.
Claire Foy tosses Queen Elizabeth’s crown in the dumpster and hurls herself into her role, tearing through the movie with thrilling fury.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to understand experience design? Eat popcorn with chopsticks”

The explanation lies in the way people perceive new things-and it serves as even more evidence that experience design matters, a lot.
The researchers invited 68 people to participate in a study that was supposedly about helping them eat more slowly.
The other half did the same but using chopsticks instead. Rating the experience, the latter group enjoyed the popcorn much more than the former-giving a much better flavor rating on the same popcorn.
Robert Smith, coauthor of the study and assistant professor of marketing at Ohio State University, writes that “When you eat popcorn with chopsticks, you pay more attention and you are more immersed in the experience. It’s like eating popcorn for the first time.”
Smith believes that this data “Suggests chopsticks boost enjoyment because they provide an unusual first-time experience, not because they are a better way to eat popcorn.” It made people more focused and engaged, even though they were eating a familiar food, which led them to perceive the experience as a better one.
Clearly, the way we experience a product greatly influences the way we perceive its value.
Experience design firms like Local Projects are booming, while more conventional agencies are adapting and expanding into retail and exhibition design.
Whether it’s changing the way a product is unpacked or the way a material feels or even how an interface sounds, even the most familiar product or service can feel novel-even exciting-when a thoughtful design tweak has reframed it as new for the user.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Steven Brill explains what killed the American dream”

The book argues the people with the most advantages in the American economy have used that privilege to catapult themselves ahead of everyone else, and then rigged the system – to cement their position at the top, and leave the less fortunate behind.
I spoke to Brill about how this came to pass, why the American dream has vanished, and what it will take to undo the damage that’s been done.
Steven Brill There isn’t one villain or one pivotal moment, but there really were several different things that started happening at the same time, and they fed off each other.
Steven Brill I think it’s a much more relevant distinction than saying people are Democrats or Republicans, or that they’re conservatives or liberals.
Steven Brill Well, they’re the “Winners” in our system who don’t need a good system of public education because their kids go to private school, who don’t care about mass transit because they can afford to drive anywhere, and they don’t need public health care because they can pay for private coverage.
Sean Illing You seem hesitant to say that the country is broken, and yet when you look at all the relevant measures – public engagement, income inequality, wage levels, satisfaction, knowledge of public policy, faith that the next generation will do better than the current one – we’re at or near historic lows.
For a large swath of the country, the majority of the country, that’s just not true anymore.
For a country to work, you have to have balance between personal ambition and personal achievements and the common good.

The orginal article.

Summary of “If You Only Read A Few Books In 2018, Read These”

If you don’t read the book, at least please read about it.
How to Live: Or A Life of Montaigne in One Question and Twenty Attempts at an Answer by Sarah Bakewell The book is spectacular.
Given the divisiveness that we are facing as a society - that became painfully clear in 2016 - this is one of the most urgent and important book you need to read next year.
It’s also easy to be disillusioned by politics right now but for me, getting lost in these Lyndon Johnson books has been a helpful and educational process.
Mr. Eternity by Aaron Thier / The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas These books really have nothing to do with the events of 2016 but they are long and entertaining and they will make you forget your problems for the next 12 months.
Because the actual book is a 1,200 page epic of some of the most brilliant, beautiful and complicated storytelling ever put to paper.
What a book! When I typed out my notes after finishing this book, it ran some 3,000 words.
Like to Read?I’ve created a list of 15 books you’ve never heard of that will alter your worldview and help you excel at your career.

The orginal article.