Summary of “Having the best mattress, suitcase, and vitamins nearly broke me”

Day one: Friday I wake up on my Casper Wave mattress in my Brooklinen sheets.
I’ve just come from a few days in DC having used an Away suitcase, which is millennial pink and is extremely fun to zag around on the cobblestones of Brooklyn and between the insufferable crowds at Penn Station.
I’m more easily annoyed about tiny imperfections – the way my feet are still clammy when I wake up, that tumbleweed of blonde hair on the floor, an annoying text that I’ll feel bad about ignoring all day.
Day two: Saturday I wake up on my Casper mattress in my Brooklinen sheets feeling absolutely miserable.
Day three: Sunday The first thing to go is the bullet journaling.
What I did not know about Care/of is that based on your answers, you can easily end up having to take nine vitamins a day.
Day six: Wednesday On the subway on the way to work, I catch a glimpse in the reflection of the door: the headless body of a woman wearing an Everlane trench coat and a tasteful $200 bag.
The last day: Friday again I wake up in my Casper mattress in my Brooklinen sheets far too early for having gone to bed at 2 am.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Making Kindness a Core Tenet of Your Company”

Almost every leader I know wants his or her colleagues to go above and beyond normal standards of service, to impress customers with their kindness.
Many of these leaders also believe that achieving this goal is largely a matter of policies and procedures – kindness as a directive.
Actually, the way to unleash kindness in your organization is to treat it like a contagion, and to create the conditions under which everybody catches it.
“Every encounter with the brand,” he declared, “Must be as extraordinary as the machine itself.” And almost every encounter with the brand, he understood, came down to a personal encounter with a human being in a dealership who could either act in ways that were memorable, or could act the rote way most people in most dealerships act.
Over the last few years, this leap of faith unleashed all sorts of everyday acts of kindness.
It’s more natural for front-line employees to show kindness towards customers, it turns out, if they are motivated by genuine pride in what they do.
They’d repaired them, ordered parts for them, but they’d never been behind the wheel on the open road. How could people take genuine pride in the brand, Hynekamp wondered, if they’d never themselves experienced the thrill of driving a Mercedes-Benz vehicle? So he created a program through which all 23,000 dealership employees got to drive a new Mercedes-Benz for 48 hours.
It’s also a reminder for leaders in all sorts of field: You can’t order people to be kind, but you can spark a kindness contagion.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The World’s Most Efficient Languages”

Other languages occupy still other places on the linguistic axis of “Busyness,” from prolix to laconic, and it’s surprising what a language can do without.
In Mandarin Chinese, a way of saying “The father said ‘Come here!'” is “FùqÄ«n shuō ‘Guò lái zhè lǐ!'” Just as in English, there is no marker for the father’s gender, nor does the form of the word shuō for “Said” indicate whether the speaker is me, you, or him.
The word for “Here,” zhè lǐ, can mean either “Right here” or “To here,” just like in English.
Anyone who has sampled Chinese, or Persian, or Finnish, knows that a language can get along just fine with the same word for “He” and “She.”* And whereas Mandarin can mark tense but often doesn’t, in the Maybrat language of New Guinea, there’s pretty much no way to mark it at all-context takes care of it and no one bats an eye.
If there were a prize for the busiest language, then a language like Kabardian, also known as Circassian and spoken in the Caucasus, would win.
In the simple sentence “The men saw me,” the word for “Saw” is sǝq’ayǝƛaaÉ£wǝaÉ£haś.
The prize for most economical language could go to certain colloquial dialects of Indonesian that are rarely written but represent the daily reality of Indonesian in millions of mouths.
So does the contrast between Riau Indonesian’s “Chicken eat” and Kabardian’s “They saw me and it affected me, not now, and I really mean it” mean that each language gives its speakers a different way of looking at the world? It’s an intriguing idea, first formulated by anthropologist and linguist Edward Sapir and amateur linguist Benjamin Whorf.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is this AI? We drew you a flowchart to work it out”

In the broadest sense, AI refers to machines that can learn, reason, and act for themselves.
As it currently stands, the vast majority of the AI advancements and applications you hear about refer to a category of algorithms known as machine learning.
These algorithms use statistics to find patterns in massive amounts of data.
They then use those patterns to make predictions on things like what shows you might like on Netflix, what you’re saying when you speak to Alexa, or whether you have cancer based on your MRI. Machine learning, and its subset deep learning, is incredibly powerful.
The grand idea is to develop something resembling human intelligence, which is often referred to as “Artificial general intelligence,” or “AGI.” Some experts believe that machine learning and deep learning will eventually get us to AGI with enough data, but most would agree there are big missing pieces and it’s still a long way off.
What would have been considered AI in the past may not be considered AI today.
To clear things up, I drew you this flowchart on the back of an envelope so you can work out whether something is using AI or not.
This originally appeared in our AI newsletter The Algorithm.

The orginal article.

Summary of “In Defense of the Mediocre Music Biopic”

Hardly an unsalvageable mess but far from transcendent, a perfunctory exercise that’s elevated only by one particularly good concert sequence and Rami Malek’s performance as Freddie Mercury – which, by the way, deserves far better than another rehash of the old rock biopic rubric of rise, fall, and redemption.
I went not in spite of these things but because of them, because “Mediocre music biopic” happens to be one of my favorite micro-genres of film, right up there with “Blatant Goodfellas ripoff” and “Movies about writer’s block.”
In these moments, the mediocre music biopic tends to lean into the skid, often building entire scenes around little more than a famous rock star shaking hands with another historical figure while they each say their full names aloud.
I think the primary reason I’m drawn to the mediocre music biopic is that I know, from personal experience, that most actual bands are incredibly boring.
The mediocre music biopic cuts everything down to a manageable, melodramatic size.
Every biopic struggles with how to make tidy narrative sense out of the messy complexities of a life, and every artist biopic, specifically, is forced to render the mostly internal, often-tedious creative process into something that isn’t deadly dull on screen.
You naturally go into these movies with your guard up, protective of what they and their music mean, so certain that the film will fail to do it justice – sure that no matter how great an actor’s performance, they will never truly become them.
In these preconceived notions, the mediocre music biopic proves you right, and in its own way, it’s a relief.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jony Ive interview: Apple design guru on how he created the new iPad”

The new products just revealed by Apple at a special event in Brooklyn this week have several things in common.
He is involved in new products across Apple, including radical upgrades of favourites such as the MacBook Air and the iPad Pro.
“So, in the new iPad Pro, one of the things we’ve been wanting to get to for a long time is a sense that the product is not oriented in a primary and then in a secondary way.”
“The first iPad had a very clear orientation which was portrait. It had the ability to be used in landscape, I think very well, but it was pretty clear how the product was designed. And I think with the first iPad you had the sense that it was a product made up of distinct and somewhat separate components.”
“If you look at the iPad Pro you can see how the radius, the curve in the corner of the display, is concentric with and sympathetic to the actual enclosure. You feel it’s authentic, and you have the sense that it’s not an assembly of a whole bag of different components: it’s a single, clear product.”
“Many of us wouldn’t consciously say ‘this is the reason I’m fond of this’ but I do think as a species we are capable of sensing much more than we are capable of articulating. I think the new iPad Pro is something so singular and integrated that it appears different from 99 per cent of other complex technology products.”
It wasn’t a new product as such, it was the announcement that the new MacBook Air was being made entirely from recycled aluminium.
“We have found it hard to find a better material. I measure that in lots of different ways, but we’ve refined the particular alloy that we use and changed the ways we can process and machine the material. This was a wonderful example of how we can solve problems, not to be different in an artificial way but to be genuinely better.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Working with a Colleague Who Feels That the World Is Against Them”

So what’s the best way to protect yourself? How can you help your colleague change their mindset? And how do you handle the emotional toll of working with this person?
Remember: your colleague is not purposely trying to make you crazy.
Say your colleague grouses about a boss who they perceive as giving them more work than anyone else on the team.
Empower your colleague and “Brace yourself around the issues,” she says.
“If you say, ‘You’re paranoid and you whine a lot,’ your colleague is not going to hear it.” Instead, focus on the behavior they should be exhibiting not the behavior you wish they’d stop.
Talk to your colleague about their behavior and the effect it’s having on the team.
Your aim is to show your colleague that their mood has a ripple effect.
Case Study #2: Talk to your colleague about the impact his mood has on the team.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Donald Trump, Michael Avenatti, and Twitter hack the press”

It’s because everything around us has changed – our business models, the way people read us, the way we compete with each other, the way we’re manipulated – and we’re not keeping up.
Partisans try to move you this way or that way and you have to ignore them.
One of the ways you can hack it is you can just go outrageous enough.
I don’t want to compare him to Trump in his ethics or morals, but I think Michael Avenatti has recognized this way of hacking the system too.
Ezra Klein This is a way in which Donald Trump has been very effective.
The asymmetry between the parties built up way before Trump came on the scene, and the press kind of let it go.
I’m worried about the very weird way in which we can hear them, and the way it’s mediated by social platforms that have their own very messed-up incentives.
The result of that is that for about 30 percent of the electorate, Trump is the major source of news about Trump.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The smartphone app that can tell you’re depressed before you know it yourself”

There is something most of those people have in common: a smartphone.
Mindstrong Health is using a smartphone app to collect measures of people’s cognition and emotional health as indicated by how they use their phones.
With details gleaned from the app, Mindstrong says, a patient’s doctor or other care manager gets an alert when something may be amiss and can then check in with the patient by sending a message through the app.
Subjects went home with an app that measured the ways they touched their phone’s display, which Dagum hoped would be an unobtrusive way to log these same kinds of behavior on a smartphone.
Brain-disorder treatment has stalled in part because doctors simply don’t know that someone’s having trouble until it’s well advanced; Dagum believes Mindstrong can figure it out much sooner and keep an eye on it 24 hours a day.
In its current form, the Mindstrong app that patients see is fairly sparse.
“There are people who are high utilizers of health care and they’re not getting the benefits, so we’ve got to figure out some way to get them something that works better.” Actually predicting that a patient is headed toward a downward spiral is a harder task, but Dagum believes that having more people using the app over time will help cement patterns in the data.
About 1,500 of the 2,000 participants also let a Mindstrong keyboard app run on their smartphones to collect data about the ways they type and figure out how their cognition changes throughout the year.

The orginal article.