Summary of “The Surprising Power of Simply Asking Coworkers How They’re Doing”

When people feel like they belong at work, they are more productive, motivated, engaged and 3.5 times more likely to contribute to their fullest potential, according to our research at the Center for Talent Innovation.
To better understand the emotional impact of belonging – and its inverse, feeling excluded – we launched the EY Belonging Barometer study, which surveyed 1,000 employed American adults.
The majority of individuals look to their homes first, before their workplaces when it comes to where they feel the greatest sense of belonging.
While the workplace exceeds neighborhood communities and places of worship, many individuals spend most of their time at work, and creating workplace communities where people feel like they belong is imperative.
So how can companies connect more effectively with employees and help them feel like they belong within their workplace community? The results of our survey pointed to one simple solution: establish more opportunities for colleagues to check in with one another.
Being invited to big or external events or presentations by senior leaders, as well as being copied on their emails, was simply less meaningful to employees when it came to feeling a sense of belonging.
Learning how to engage with employees in a way that they feel comfortable is key to creating a sense of community.
If someone shares something that you don’t understand or agree with, you might consider acknowledging their point of view or asking them to tell you more.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Minding the Gap’s Bing Liu on America’s Masculinity Crisis”

Liu filmed most of the footage over a five-year span between 2012 and 2017, but he also draws from a well of archival footage that captures the inexorable loss of childhood.
Whereas in the film I was like, Well, I had the confines and the structure and the purpose of making this film to latch onto, to keep plodding on.
There’s only so much we can fit into a 90-minute film.
So it’s not in the film, but I know that, and maybe other people will pick up on that.
Did filming and observing Zack give you insight into this crisis of masculinity white men seem to be experiencing? Absolutely.
In the climax of the film, Zack talks about why he feels like he has to hide his true self and he has to wear a mask.
You’d have to do another film to know what she thinks about it.
Now the scene where I confront my mom about my last film.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Different Kind of Theory of Everything”

A table is really a collection of atoms; atoms, upon closer inspection, reveal themselves to be clusters of protons and neutrons; each of these is, more microscopically, a trio of quarks; and quarks, in turn, are presumed to consist of something yet more fundamental.
An even stranger fact is that, when there are competing descriptions, one often turns out to be more true than the others, because it extends to a deeper or more general description of reality.
Of the three ways of describing objects’ motion the approach that turns out to be more true is the underdog: the principle of least action.
It happens again and again that, when there are many possible descriptions of a physical situation-all making equivalent predictions, yet all wildly different in premise-one will turn out to be preferable, because it extends to an underlying reality, seeming to account for more of the universe at once.
The languages describe different scales or domains of the same reality but aren’t always related etymologically.
Some researchers are attempting to wean physics off of space-time in order to pave the way toward this deeper theory.
To Arkani-Hamed, the multifariousness of the laws suggests a different conception of what physics is all about.
“The ascension to the tenth level of intellectual heaven,” he told me, “Would be if we find the question to which the universe is the answer, and the nature of that question in and of itself explains why it was possible to describe it in so many different ways.” It’s as though physics has been turned inside out.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Fresh Air: ‘Never Enough’ Explains The Biology Of The Addicted Brain”

The changes in behavior that happen during adolescence are so important and lasting, because the brain is forming permanent structures.
So whatever you experience as an adolescent is going to have a much more impactful influence on the rest of your life trajectory than it would, say, if you did this at another time in development when your brain wasn’t so prone to changing.
We see definitely lasting changes on the brain and behavior.
It’s a tiny, tiny molecule, and it acts all over the brain in so many different pathways.
So it’s like cocaine in that its actions are very specific, and it’s like alcohol in that those actions are all over the brain.
When we smoke marijuana the whole brain is flooded with THC, and that causes the cell-to-cell communication in cells throughout the brain to be enhanced or to be exaggerated.
What’s unfortunate is the brain does adapt to that, and it adapts by decreasing the number of sites that THC can have an effect [on].
The problem is if we reduce suffering and we produce euphoria using opiates, the brain adapts.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How New Emoji Are Changing the Pictorial Language”

“I propose a tumbler of whiskey,” or “I salute you in the manner that a formal-event toast implies.” Counterintuitively, all these emoji are less applicable because they contain more information.
The drive to offer more detailed information is behind most appeals for additions to the emoji character set, so that condition is likely to amplify.
This year, a blood drop will be added to the emoji set.
The design rankled some, who had hoped for an emoji explicitly designed to depict menstruation.
It makes sense that emoji should strive to cover the gamut of human experience; more than half of human beings menstruate at some point in time, so that’s a good place to exert effort.
Appeals in the form of there’s no emoji for have almost reached meme status.
These factors have changed the way emoji get created, selected, and used.
Writing about the rise of the dumpling emoji in Fast Company, Harry McCracken explained how the consortium debates the global fallout of new character designs, including the implications of specific forms of dumplings.

The orginal article.

Summary of “how the rest of Europe views Brexit”

Ignacio Molina, a senior analyst at the Elcano Royal Institute in Madrid, agrees Brexit has disfigured the image of British politics as “Moderate, pragmatic and dependable”.
According to Molina, the “Systemic failure” of Brexit has called into question the very idea of “The great British democracy. It’s a project that hasn’t been thought through. Even with Trump, there’s a strategy. But with Brexit there’s no strategy and no plan. It’s the most un-British thing there is!” Sam Jones.
The journalist Pierre Haski sums up Brexit bafflement: “Did electors really vote Brexit to allow the haughty aristocrat Jacob Rees-Mogg or the demagogue Boris Johnson to challenge Theresa May or for Jeremy Corbyn to get into Downing Street without saying what he will do about Brexit?” It was a genuine question.
Jean-Marc Puissesseau, the president of the company that runs the Calais port – also working hard to avoid Brexit chaos – says there were signs of Brexit years ago.
Growing awareness of the political paralysis wrought by Brexit may have had one unexpected spin-off – a rise in support for EU membership here, where recorded levels of Euroscepticism have often matched, or even surpassed, those in Britain.
In the days after the Brexit vote, Britons would remark that the Germans must be positively swimming in schadenfreude, after we had caused so much trouble in the EU. But among the people I spoke to – government spokespeople, supermarket cashiers, diplomats and taxi drivers – the overwhelming emotions were sadness and disappointment.
Even in their Brexit bewilderment, Germans still love holidaying in the UK, savour our lively parliamentary debate and obsess over the royals.
A professor of risk assessment tells me the path to Brexit was long clear in Britain’s difficult relationship with the EU. “I think it is time Britain left now,” he says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Time Management Hacks That Very Successful People Practice Daily”

Have you ever wondered how certain people could run a business, spend time with their family, hit the conference circuit and write a book? It’s not because they have superpowers.
These people have learned the time management hacks that successful people practice daily.
What better way to improve your time management than by learning the hacks from some of the most successful people in the world?
In “The Ultimate Guide to Time Management,” life and business strategist and best-selling author Tony Robbins suggests you treat your time the same way as you take care of your money.
Robbins recommends converting wasted time into productive time.
Both men have said that the secret to their success and time management is filling their calendars with plenty of blank spaces.
It gives a person the time to focus on their passions and control their time.
This “Allows me to essentially have more quality time overall, and even when I don’t have quality time, if I get caught in commute, I tend to do a lot of learning and some of that thinking time during that. So I have a lot of productive time, either avoiding the commute or if I’m in the commute, making sure I use that time in a really valuable way.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Stop Catastrophizing: An Expert’s Guide”

Let us start by considering why some people catastrophize – that is, on hearing uncertain news, they imagine the worst possible outcome.
High levels of anxiety are extremely unpleasant, so we look for ways to discharge those unpleasant feelings as quickly as possible.
If a catastrophizer is told something inconclusive – for example, if they go to a doctor and are asked to have tests – they look for a way to feel in control again immediately.
In this way, catastrophizing soon becomes a well-entrenched habit.
There is always another source to check or another opinion to be had; as a result, catastrophizers feel anxious again increasingly quickly.
If you are a catastrophizer and you would rather not be, how do you go about making changes?
Anxiety is energy: if you are an anxious person, celebrate! However, why waste that energy feeling uncomfortable and preparing yourself for circumstances that will almost certainly never occur? Look for enjoyable ways to challenge yourself and use your energy more positively: taking regular aerobic exercise; learning something new; taking up a creative passion.
Whenever you are overwhelmed by anxiety and feel you must seek reassurance, give yourself permission to do so – but not straight away.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Three Writing Rules to Disregard”

Certain prose rules are essentially inarguable-¬≠that a sentence’s subject and its verb should agree in number, for instance.
I swear to you, a well-­constructed sentence sounds better.
A good sentence, I find myself saying frequently, is one that the reader can follow from beginning to end, no matter how long it is, without having to double back in confusion because the writer misused or omitted a key piece of punctuation, chose a vague or misleading pronoun, or in some other way engaged in inadvertent misdirection.
No, do begin a sentence with “And” or “But,” if it strikes your fancy to do so.
You may find that your “And” or “But” sentence might easily attach to its predecessor sentence with either a comma or a semicolon.
One thing to add: Writers who are not so adept at linking their sentences habitually toss in a “But” or a “However” to create the illusion that a second thought contradicts a first thought when it doesn’t do any such thing.
Let me say this about this: Ending a sentence with a preposition isn’t always such a hot idea, mostly because a sentence should, when it can, aim for a powerful finale and not simply dribble off like an old man’s unhappy micturition.
To tie a sentence into a strangling knot to avoid a prepositional conclusion is unhelpful and unnatural, and it’s something no good writer should attempt and no eager reader should have to contend with.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Think You’re Special? That Just Proves You’re Normal”

Among the creepier experiences of modern life is one that happens to me, though definitely not just me, on a regular basis: I’ll meet a friend for a drink, he’ll recommend some book or film or product he thinks I’ll like, and then, within days – without searching for it online – I’ll start seeing targeted web ads for it.
There’s another reason Big Tech knows us so much better than we think, which is that each of us is far more normal than we realise.
All that’s really just a distraction from the brute statistical fact: on any given dimension, all else being equal, of course you’re probably normal.
Shorn of any value judgment, that’s all the word “Normal” means.
Your intelligence, your creativity, your tastes in culture or romantic partners, the degree to which the world has mistreated you: the chances are they’re much less quirky or extreme than you think, especially since we’ve each got strong ulterior motives to believe otherwise.
Or to put it another way: thinking you’re special is just one more way in which you’re normal.
This is the famous Lake Wobegon phenomenon known as “Illusory superiority”, which explains why most people think they’re above average at driving, at being unbiased, and various other things.
The trouble is that both the positive and negative forms of thinking you’re less normal than you are lead to misery – either by convincing you you’re unusually bad, or by turning life into an isolating, adversarial exercise in maintaining your sense of being unusually good.

The orginal article.