Summary of “How to overcome common decision-making obstacles”

Leaders face some common obstacles that get in the way of their decision-making skills, says Richard Horwath, CEO of Strategic Thinking Institute, and author of StrategyMan vs. the Anti-Strategy Squad. Understanding and overcoming them is essential to breaking destructive decision-making patterns and getting to better outcomes.
“The biggest issue that I see when it comes to decision making for managers is this idea of anchors,” Horwath says.
To overcome the distraction of anchors, Horwath recommends writing down the decision you need to make.
Overconfidence, or excessive optimism or belief in your own judgment, is another trap, says Alain Samson, PhD, founder of BehavioralEconomics.com and chief science officer at Syntoniq, a company specialized in assessing biases in financial decision making.
Think through the downside potential and the impact your decision may have on others to give yourself a reality check.
Confirmation bias, in which we look for and interpret information in ways that support what we believe, can be influenced by a decision to be “Right” or wishful thinking, he says.
If you tend to be an impulsive decision maker, impose a “Cooling-off” period before you finalize big decisions.
Reflect on your own personal patterns and motivations in decision making.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Things that are ‘normal’ in the US but weird everywhere else”

Flickr/Mark FinneySometimes people in the US forget that the way we do things isn’t necessarily the way it’s done everywhere else.
That doesn’t necessarily mean these American customs are bad, it just means that they aren’t the norm throughout the world.
Here are some regular things we do in the US that people from other cultures might think is a bit abnormal.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jim Carrey’s Return to Hollywood”

The Jim Carrey that everyone else in Hollywood remembers is the guy who was first to command $20 million a picture – the one who shot like a meteor from his weekly TV showcase on Fox’s In Living Color 
to box office stardom with a string of hits in quick succession.
He famously turned up with a full, luxuriant beard on Jimmy Kimmel Live! in the spring of 2017, doling out lines like “Jim Carrey is a great character and 
I was lucky to get the part.” A few months later, at a party during New York Fashion Week, he told 
a red carpet reporter, “I wanted 
to come to the most meaningless thing I could come to.” And: 
”I believe we’re a field of energy dancing for itself. And I don’t care. There is no me.” The bizarre behavior came amid the media’s lurid fixation on the sad saga 
of his makeup artist ex, Cathriona 
White, whose relatives tried 
to engulf Carrey in an ugly legal battle in the wake of her suicide in 2015.
The nights in Vegas led to years on the road, and then, just as Carrey had made a name for himself in the States, he did the 
most Jim Carrey thing he could do: He dumped all the impressions that had gained him his following and began experimenting with whatever struck him 
as funny that night.
Though he and Jane, who’s now 30, remain fiercely close – as Carrey is with her 8-year-old son, Jackson, 
whose Little League games can consume his weekends – growing up in Jim Carrey’s shadow was not without challenge.
Last year, behind-the-scenes footage from the celebrated film became the subject of a Netflix documentary, Jim & Andy: The Great Beyond, that’s earned Carrey an Emmy nomination.
Speaking in the third person, Carrey says, “So that people wouldn’t think Jim is an asshole.”
“I loved this idea that Jeff Pickles could capture both the big, silly Jim Carrey you love from Ace Ventura and Dumb and Dumber,” he says, “But also the heavy, weighty Jim Carrey of Eternal Sunshine.”
I wonder aloud if Carrey felt obligated to return to the kind of broad fare that delighted so many millions of fans.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why we hate using email but love sending texts”

As short message service and other forms of text messaging have grown to become such a core part of the way we interact with each other, they have done so at the expense of the form of digital communication that preceded it email.
Our love affair with email was short-lived and many of us now have a genuine dislike of our inbox, preferring to tap out text messages until our thumbs ache.
So why have we come to loathe email so much? Why is it such a source of anxiety, tedium, guilt? Why do we hate emails, but love texts?
“You had to memorise other people’s also dumb email addresses – and you had like, five people that had email, and you all felt really cool. That’s how it used to be – it was not very widely known.”
The ratio of people using email for fun versus those using it for work has flipped since the 1990s, according to Morrison.
Generation Z won’t kill email dead – some estimates show that 85% of Gen Z view email as an essential form of communication, compared to 89% of millennials and 92% of Gen X. But those under the age of 22 definitely use email differently.
“We are losing one thing as email declines – and that’s no one really owns email,” says Ivory.
In reality text messages are only likely be doomed if they become tied to work in the way email has.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Identity Trap: How to Be Less Wrong”

They’re representations of different moral systems - or more broadly, identity systems - that people use to understand the world around them.
The difference is that some people can recognize the fact that having and maintaining a systematic identity is an illusion, one that leads to frequent missteps, and as a result, they can then correct course before it occurs.
What we call an identity is mostly a product of memory, and memory - as both science and history have consistently shown - is incredibly hazy and questionable.
The world around you exists independently of the opinions of right and wrong that you enforce on it.
In an increasingly chaotic reality, one that is becoming more and more difficult for us to comprehend, the solution isn’t to enforce more static interpretations on it; it’s to deal with it how it is asking to be dealt with - in a fluid way.
If there is anything that the 21st century is going to demand, it’s the ability to tighten that feedback loop between self and other so new information is openly evaluated and so that errors and mistakes are viewed beyond the confines of a biased, subjective identity defined by these same plans and frameworks.
We can still respect our identity systems and our values, but we also have to develop the capacity to step outside of them when circumstances demand.
The TakeawayWhen we really break this down, the ability to correct mistakes and to be less wrong over time comes down to one thing: the capacity to embrace and understand the contradictions that arise in the world when they do.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Zoning Out in the Age of Netflix”

“Could you put something on in the background.” More than once in recent months, that’s been a request from my wife while she’s doing something around the house.
Said another way: I think a lot of people like cable simply because you can turn on the television and you always know that something will be on.
It’s simply turning the TV on and having something, anything, be on in the background.
I wonder if there’s a way for the newfangled streaming services to not only replicate this, but to replace it with something better.
Live content will start playing, but only in chicklet form, until you decide what you want to actually watch.
It’s more of an update in content and approach, not necessarily presentation.
I don’t necessarily have an answer here, but I do think this is something non-obvious that has been overlooked in our move to having endless content on demand at our fingertips.
Such devices are even better for music in this way these days, because you can just say something like “Play some 90s rock” and not worry about picking one song from all the music ever recorded.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Stay Married After Your Baby is Born, or, I’m not Divorced Yet”

Taking care of a child is so hard, so time consuming: it made sense that our emotions and needs would consume me and that in turn, three years later I would have a blank space for a lot of where Josh should be.
Sad, because it’s almost always, from other mothers I’ve talked to, true: that blank memory space for me, is partly blank because I expected the relationship I had with Josh to be on hold while I kept the baby alive.
Back in the earliest days of our relationship, when I was barely a known entity to Josh’s brother and parents, I felt uncomfortable but energized by their ability to make decisions quickly, where my family, the one we now had without my mother, sometimes took hours to decide what to have for dinner simply because everyone failed to speak their mind in a timely fashion.
“You’re all like your father!” my mother used to say in exasperation, years after my parents divorced.
Though Josh and I had taken on his personal characteristic of openly and sometimes hostilely attacking each other over, say, how good the films of Paul Thomas Anderson are, the stakes of so many of the arguments we’d had over the years before Zelda were extremely low.
At the time of the separation, with my oldest brother, David, already at college, we decided that my brothers and me would stay with my mother.
We wanted to stay with our mother too, because, well, she was the cool parent.
If we’d never had children, I believe Josh and I would probably never have been truly confronted with this need to learn how to make decisions together, how to relent or come to an agreement even if disagreement remains.

The orginal article.

Summary of “James Bridle on why technology is creating a new dark age”

There’s a couple of things I talk about regarding climate in the book, and one of them is to be really, really super direct about the actual threat of it, which is horrific, and it’s kind of so horrific that it’s difficult for us to think about.
Simply the act of articulating that – making it really, really clear, exploring some of the implications of it – that kind of realism is a super necessary act.
Which, again, we kind of don’t often do, particularly in the context of technology – where we see this stuff as a kind of ongoing, always upward unstoppable march.
Technology always walks this kind of weird knife edge.
At the same time, if you do manage to crack them open just a little bit, if you get some kind of understanding, everything suddenly becomes really quite starkly clear in ways that it wasn’t before.
I’m kind of insisting on that moment being the moment of possibility – not some kind of weird imaginary future point where it all becomes clear, but just these moments of doubt and uncertainty and retelling of different stories.
The really interesting science fiction to me now happens kind of in the next week or the next year at most because it’s so obvious to us how little we can predict about long-term futures, which really, for me, is more of a reflection of reality than reality is a reflection of science fiction.
There’s a whole genre of design fiction as well that posits these political things as design objects as a way to kind of pull those futures into being.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The extreme leadership that got the Thai soccer boys out of the cave alive”

The Washington Post spoke with Kolditz about the role of the boys’ coach, the five themes that define “In extremis” leaders, and what people most want to see from the people in charge when their life is on the line.
I did most of the research in Iraq, but I interviewed people who were climbing guides and took people up difficult climbs like Mount Everest, large formation skydiving organizers who put 300 to 400 people out of airplanes at the same time, and a woman who took HD video teams into the Indian tiger preserves and videoed tigers on the ground.
The way crisis leadership is usually studied is through the case study method, and so you’re studying people in ordinary companies who never really wanted to be in a crisis but found themselves there and either fixed it or didn’t.
The problem with that is you’re essentially studying crisis amateurs, and what I wanted to do was study crisis professionals – people who are in dangerous places all the time, and look at their techniques, their approaches to leadership, how they were different.
What people need is to be inspired that there is a way ahead that has positive outcomes for them.
The third thing we found was having “Shared risk.” People tend to trust leaders who have skin in the game, who also are occupying a similar level of risk.
The notion of competence needs to be just sweating out of those people.
One of the things we always argue to the people we are training as leaders is don’t think you’re going to adopt some leadership style.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I Watched ‘The Simpsons’ for the First Time Ever and I Couldn’t Stand It”

“I designed this course for a semester, and I really didn’t expect so many students to show up. But I had 500 the first year.” The class became so well known it was even recognized by Simpsons writers and featured in the episode “Little Girl in the Big Ten.”.
You might as well call me Frank Grimes, because I absolutely hate Homer, and couldn’t stand watching the show mostly due to his character.
In “Homer’s Enemy,” Marge cooks a nice lobster dinner so Homer can reconcile with Frank Grimes.
Through flashbacks, we learn that every time Marge is pregnant, Homer apparently gets so angry he rips his hair out.
Mr. Burns erects the sign “Don’t forget: you’re here forever,” which Homer covers in Maggie’s baby photos so that the sign reads “Do it for her.” Cue the “Awwws.” Because Homer had feelings about his own child for approximately three seconds on screen, it’s a touching episode.
In “Homer Badman,” when Homer goes to a candy convention, Marge is his candy mule.
A lot has been said about race in The Simpsons and 90s shows more broadly-I don’t need or want to dive into that here more than I already have.
If you love The Simpsons and the show is special to you, that’s great.

The orginal article.