Summary of “Toward a Theory of the New Weird”

By learning to read weird fictions on a literal level it may be possible to see how weird reality already is.
The Atwood story is a perfect example of The Weird, according to the definition of weirdness provided by the late Mark Fisher in his 2016 book, The Weird and the Eerie.
Taken together, Fisher’s notions of the weird and the eerie are ways of describing what he calls “That which does not belong.” The reason it does not belong is not that it is artificial or supernatural as opposed to natural.
“Natural” is exactly what is displaced, or made to not belong, in a weird story.
There’s a potential name for this kind of fiction: the New Weird.
The term itself isn’t new at all by now; it’s been floating around since the early 2000s, and even then, the type of writing it described was not necessarily a novel departure from types of writing that came before, such as the New Wave of the 1960s or the horror fiction of the 80s. Like all “New” and “Post-” terminology, the New is an adjective used to distinguish from and connect to a past genre-in this case what might be called the “Old Weird.” Old Weird is a name retroactively given to certain writing from the late 19th and early 20th century.
What feels weird or eerie depends on who you are, and is therefore a political question.
Through perceptual flips, New Weird could relocate the weird other from the outside to within.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Yale Research Confirms What You’ve Always Suspected: Nobody Is Normal”

Every day, millions of people around the world ask Google some variation of the question, “Am I normal?” Burdened by shame, we turn to the internet to figure out if our behavior, our bodies, and our deepest emotions mark us as outside the mainstream.
The very fact that so many of us are typing “Is it normal to talk to yourself?” or “How often do couples have sex?” into our browsers late at night suggests that, yes, whatever your quirk, lots of other folks probably have it too.
A new review published by two Yale psychologists in Trends in Cognitive Sciences argues that we’re all a little bit weird, but being weird is totally normal.
In order to feel like a weirdo, you have to believe there is such a thing as normal – a standard or optimal state of being in whatever area you’re worried about.
By analyzing a host of traits – from the beak shapes of specific bird species to psychological characteristics like our appetite for risk taking – the authors show that these qualities exist along a continuum, and separating the “Normal” from the “Weird” is usually impossible.
“I would argue that there is no fixed normal,” senior author Avram Holmes commented, summing up the findings.
“There’s a level of variability in every one of our behaviors,” and “Any behavior is neither solely negative or solely positive. There are potential benefits for both, depending on the context you’re placed in.”
Barring obvious dysfunction and misery, you are almost certainly way more normal than you think you are.

The orginal article.