Summary of “Thousands of autistic girls and women ‘going undiagnosed’ due to gender bias”

Hundreds of thousands of girls and women with autism are going undiagnosed due to it being viewed as a “Male condition”, according to one of the UK’s leading neuroscientists.
Prof Francesca HappĂ©, director of the Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre at King’s College London, warned that the failure to recognise autism in girls and women was taking a stark toll on their mental health.
“We’ve overlooked autism in women and girls and I think there’s a real gender equality issue here,” she said.
More recent work suggests there may be subtle differences in how autism presents in girls and women.
Teachers and clinicians tend to be less inclined to consider autism as a likely explanation for girls and women struggling with social and communication problems than with boys and men.
If the real ratio were shown to be 3:1, this would suggest that up to 200,000 girls and women with autism have been omitted from the national tally.
Carol Povey, director of the National Autistic Society’s Centre for Autism, said there was growing recognition of the issue, with a steady increase in referrals of women and girls to specialist diagnostic centres during the past few years.
“The problem is that professionals often don’t understand the different ways autism can manifest in women and girls, with many going through their lives without a diagnosis and an understanding of why they feel different.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Beth Moore: The Evangelical Superstar Taking on Trump”

For the moment most evangelical women look like Beth Moore’s traditional fan base: white and middle-aged.
The event was billed as an “Intimate” gathering, but 5,000 women sitting in a church auditorium is intimate only by contrast with the arena-size crowds Moore hosted in the past.
On her way to the stage, Moore worked the room in stiletto boots, greeting strangers like old friends.
“Some of you are here to see if I’m as big a fruitcake as they say that I am, and”-here Moore emitted a theatrical little gasp-laugh, like helium escaping a balloon-“You probably already have your answer.”
Debbie, 54, my seatmate, had been to eight Beth Moore events.
Moore walked slowly among them as if in a trance, pausing to rub a back or whisper a prayer.
Above all, what women seem to want from Moore is to be seen.
This article appears in the October 2018 print edition with the headline “Will Beth Moore Lose Her Flock?”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Emma Thompson, In Conversation”

“The way in which I frame my past,” says Emma Thompson, sitting in her cool Manhattan hotel room on a sweltering late-summer day, “Is always changing.” And yet some things stay the same.
You think a “Crumbling” happens in every long-term relationship?Not necessarily crumbling, but if the relationship hasn’t changed for long periods of time then the people in it are probably serving a facsimile of what the relationship used to be.
You think about what might happen here with Roe versus Wade, and then also think about what happened in Ireland where abortion and gay marriage were made possible – extraordinary.
The thing is, you were asking how my thinking has changed: I was reading The Madwoman in the Attic.
If you think about – okay, another story: I was doing a thing with trafficking.
The thing is, I don’t think of my career in phases.
For a while that belief persisted, but I think everyone’s beginning to realize that good acting can be all sorts of things.
You clean out the cupboard and you find something in it that leads you to another task, which you get terribly involved in, and you think, Great, that’ll take me another day.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How I Learned to Embrace Power as a Woman in Washington”

Throughout my career, I’d been called “Tough.” It was a compliment that was regularly paid to women in Washington who demanded excellent work, but of course, it always sounded less begrudging when it was said of a man.
The question of how women use their power is far more complicated, more difficult and more urgent today than it is for men.
Women are often in denial about their own capabilities and search for others-groups of women or commanding men-to establish their power.
The real drawback of this dynamic is that it affects how women do their jobs.
More than anything, women have to become more accustomed to getting power.
Women need to stop thinking that “Power” is a dirty word, or that the trappings of power matter less than the work.
Women have a tremendous amount of power that comes with the roles we play in society, far more power than we ever had before.
At the same time, we have to appreciate that so many of the remaining obstacles to women’s advancement- most blatantly, perhaps, the sexual harassment in the workplace that has become an important topic of conversation-are all about power.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Don’t Underestimate the Power of Women Supporting Each Other at Work”

Don’t underestimate the power of women connecting and supporting each other at work.
Senior-level women who champion younger women even today are more likely to get negative performance reviews, according to a 2016 study in The Academy of Management Journal.
According to a 2016 McKinsey report, Women in the Workplace, white men make up 36% of entry-level corporate jobs, and white women make up 31%. But at the very first rung above that, those numbers change to 47% for white men and 26% for white women – a 16% drop.
For women of color, the drop from 17% to 11% is a plunge of 35%. People tend to think that whatever conditions exist now are “Normal.” Maybe this explains men’s blind spots: at companies where only one in ten senior leaders are women, says McKinsey, nearly 50% of men felt women were “Well represented” in leadership.
I hope it lowered the attrition rate of women working at my company – rates that are, across all corporate jobs, stubbornly higher for women than men, especially women of color.
What are women in the workplace to do, when research shows that we’re penalized for trying to lift each other up? The antidote to being penalized for sponsoring women may just be to do it more – and to do it vocally, loudly, and proudly – until we’re able to change perceptions.
There are massive benefits for the individual and the organization when women support each other.
I’m thrilled by the rise of women’s organizations like Sallie Krawchek’s Ellevate Network, a professional network of women supporting each other across companies to change the culture of business at large.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Mughal queen who became a feminist icon”

Many of its emperors and royal women, including Nur Jahan, were patrons of art, music and architecture – they built grand cities and majestic forts, mosques and tombs.
Nur was born in 1577 near Kandahar to eminent Persian nobles who had left their home in Iran amid increasing intolerance under the Safavid dynasty to seek refuge in the more liberal Mughal empire.
Raised in a blend of traditions from her parents’ birthplace and their adopted homeland, Nur first married a Mughal government official and former military officer in 1594.
The widowed Nur was given refuge in Jahangir’s harem, where other women gradually started to trust and admire her.
Though few women were mentioned in official court records at the time, Jahangir’s memoirs from 1614 onward confirm his special relationship with Nur.
Many historians believe that Jahangir was an ailing drunkard who no longer had the stamina or focus to rule, and that is why he gave up the control of his kingdom to Nur.
That’s not why Nur became a ruler to be reckoned with.
Her signature in the order read, Nur Jahan Padshah Begum, which translates as Nur Jahan, the Lady Emperor.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Mughal queen who became a feminist icon”

Many of its emperors and royal women, including Nur Jahan, were patrons of art, music and architecture – they built grand cities and majestic forts, mosques and tombs.
Nur was born in 1577 near Kandahar to eminent Persian nobles who had left their home in Iran amid increasing intolerance under the Safavid dynasty to seek refuge in the more liberal Mughal empire.
Raised in a blend of traditions from her parents’ birthplace and their adopted homeland, Nur first married a Mughal government official and former military officer in 1594.
The widowed Nur was given refuge in Jahangir’s harem, where other women gradually started to trust and admire her.
Though few women were mentioned in official court records at the time, Jahangir’s memoirs from 1614 onward confirm his special relationship with Nur.
Many historians believe that Jahangir was an ailing drunkard who no longer had the stamina or focus to rule, and that is why he gave up the control of his kingdom to Nur.
That’s not why Nur became a ruler to be reckoned with.
Her signature in the order read, Nur Jahan Padshah Begum, which translates as Nur Jahan, the Lady Emperor.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Women of Color Get to Senior Management”

The problem is that, to date, companies have not been great at promoting women of color to senior roles.
To increase diversity at senior executive levels, more must be known about one group in particular: women of color in midlevel leadership, who successfully developed and progressed beyond individual contributor and first-line management.
In order to advance from first-level management toward senior leadership, the women in my sample needed to have access to managing people, critical negotiations, new businesses ventures, and external client relations.
Having influential senior leaders – including men as well as women of color – serve as mentors, advisers, and role models provided emerging women managers with the tacit knowledge needed to navigate their company’s leadership structure.
Clearly, elevating women of color isn’t just the job of the women themselves, as these experiences highlight.
Business leaders monitor and are held accountable for making or missing sales goals, so why not the same for diversity and inclusion? That’s why companies must monitor culture and talent metrics for women of color in addition to surveying them about how they’re experiencing their development and progression.
In traditional male-dominated hierarchies, tacit knowledge about how the organization works, the availability of advancement opportunities, and how to access mentors and sponsors is often shared through homogenous closed social networks that women of color aren’t privy to.
In learning from women of color who have advanced, and in learning effective ways to develop and sponsor them, these women and the companies they work for can turn aspirations into something more concrete: meaningful and long-lasting leadership experiences.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Women Can Get What They Want in a Negotiation”

How common is Tara’s situation? Research suggests that 20% of women never negotiate at all.
If women see negotiation as a chore, they either don’t negotiate or do so in ways that can hurt the outcome.
Based on a growing body of research on gender in negotiations, combined with burgeoning research on positivity and mindfulness, we offer five strategies that can help women both choose to engage and perform more effectively in negotiations.
Prior to a negotiation, women can use positive priming to increase positive emotions, resulting in greater creativity, openness, and willingness to collaborate, all of which are essential to successful negotiation.
This can increase the likelihood that women choose to enter a negotiation to begin with.
A greater awareness of the emotions of others during a negotiation can help women better understand their needs and interests, which can make it easier to find integrative solutions.
The ability to reframe the negotiation – even one with the goal of increasing one’s total compensation – into one where the other party also benefits is particularly important for women.
In the case of salary negotiation, women would help themselves by looking at the total compensation package, which might include paid time off, the hiring of an assistant, or a commuting allowance – all of which have monetary value – as opposed to salary alone.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Elon Musk’s New York Times Interview Reveals Double Standards for Male and Female CEOs”

For women, the risks of being open are far greater, and they can manifest in tangible ways.
“Women incur social and economic penalties for expressing masculine-typed emotions because they violate proscriptions against dominance for women. At the same time, when women express female-typed emotions, they are judged as overly emotional and lacking emotional control, which ultimately undermines women’s competence and professional legitimacy,” according to the Handbook on Well-Being of Working Women, a collection of research and literature on the topic.
The guidebook for being a female CEO is, at its core, the same as the one for being a female anything: No matter your title, the double bind remains.
Women in the workplace are constantly walking a tightrope.
A 2008 series of studies from the Harvard Kennedy School’s Women and Public Policy Program found that displays of anger from men in professional contexts are often viewed as responses to external circumstances, while the same from women are seen as representations of their personality.
In other words, men are provoked, while women are naturally prone to anger.
The research also found that women who expressed anger in work contexts were perceived as less competent and received lower wages, while the opposite was true for men.
According to It’s Always Personal: Navigating Emotion in the New Workplace by Anne Kreamer, women who cry at work “Feel rotten afterward, as if they’ve failed a feminism test.” Men tend to feel better after crying: Kreamer’s research showed that “Their minds felt sharper, the future seemed brighter, and they felt more physically relaxed and in control.” When HuffPost interviewed 15 high-profile female leaders about crying in the office, the majority considered it taboo and bound to produce negative results.

The orginal article.