Summary of “Motherhood Isn’t Sacrifice, It’s Selfishness”

One male character declares that the woman must “Learn in silence with all subjection” and that “She shall be saved by childbearing.” In this scenario, the act of motherhood is subverted for the benefit of those in power, and they get away with it because of the concept of motherhood as sacrifice.
Motherhood is not a sacrifice, but a privilege – one that many of us choose selfishly.
By reframing motherhood as a privilege, we redirect agency back to the mother, empowering her, celebrating her autonomy instead of her sacrifice.
There are many mothers who would not have chosen motherhood, for financial or personal reasons.
Calling motherhood “The hardest job in the world” misses the point completely because having and raising children is not a “Job.” No one will deny that there is exhaustion, fear and tedium.
Calling motherhood a woman’s “Job” only serves to keep a woman in her place.
If we start referring to motherhood as the beautiful, messy privilege that it is, and to tending to our children as the most loving yet selfish thing we do, perhaps we can change the biased language my mother used.
Only when we stop talking about motherhood as sacrifice can we start talking about mothers the way that we deserve.

The orginal article.

Summary of “When Health Law Isn’t Enough, the Desperate Line Up at Tents”

Ms. Neal had driven six hours from Hickory, N.C., with her wife, Angel Neal, 35.
Robin Neal has fought Type 1 diabetes since age 10, she said.
Angel Neal, who drives a forklift, has pancreatitis.
In a backward baseball cap with a tattoo of stars and musical notes on her neck, Robin Neal, looking unwell, was interviewed by a triage nurse.
“You need to go to the E.R.,” she told Ms. Neal.
Angel Neal was suffering abdominal pain and nausea.
After an hour in the tent hooked up to intravenous drips, the women were discharged.
Robin Neal, whose vision was tested at 20/100, desperately needed a pair of the free eyeglasses RAM offered.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘The Big Sick,’ South Asian Identity and Me”

Starring and co-written by Kumail Nanjiani, who was born in Karachi, it explores the South Asian identity in depth, and speaks to conflicts that many of us face growing up in America.
A number of South Asian women have expressed a reaction completely different from mine, seeing “The Big Sick” as yet another movie that portrays South Asian women as inherently less desirable.
For the website Jezebel, the Brooklyn artist Aditi Natasha Kini wrote a critique of the film, titled “I’m Tired of Watching Brown Men Fall in Love With White Women Onscreen.” On Vice, Amil Niazi wrote, “I found myself growing increasingly frustrated and then infuriated with the clichéd, stereotypical depictions of South Asian women that have unfortunately become the norm in the growing onscreen narratives of brown men.”
Tanzila Ahmed, writing for The Aerogram, a South Asian culture site, summed up the critique this way: “Once again, Muslim Brown women were crafted as undesirable, conventional and unmarriageable for the Modern Muslim-ish Male.”.
I didn’t see “The Big Sick” as a rejection of South Asian women, but rather a rejection of arranged marriage, a difficult and searing subject for some of us who have experienced it up close.
Of course, Mr. Nanjiani, Mr. Patel and many, many other South Asian children who grew up in the United States didn’t have an experience like mine.
The critique of “The Big Sick” as contributing to stereotypes of South Asian women is surely understandable.
In my eyes, the point wasn’t to relegate South Asian women to a punch line, but to add levity to a story in which Mr. Nanjiani struggles with a choice that could isolate him from his family.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Turning The Tables: The 150 Greatest Albums Made By Women”

This list, of the greatest albums made by women between 1964 and the present, is an intervention, a remedy, a correction of the historical record and hopefully the start of a new conversation.
The self-titled 1979 debut album by The Roches made consciousness-raising into music.
Nestled confidently between jazz and R&B, her album The Mosaic Project was at turns brainy, sassy, soulful and revolutionary – rather like the women it celebrated.
Carrington’s project, which spawned a sequel album in 2015, remains a necessary intervention in a musical community whose presumed leading lights still allege that women don’t care for solos.
About the era during which she released her second album, the electrified Flaming Red, Griffin said: “I always felt like I was a rock singer. It was all I listened to. I felt like, ‘Don’t call me a folksinger.'” Her stance and sound have both mellowed since 1998, but Flaming Red remains a testament to the fire simmering under all of her work preceding this album, and what came after it.
How good must it have felt for Kim Deal to release the eclectic masterpiece Last Splash with her band The Breeders? Throughout the seven years prior to the album’s 1993 release, she had made influential music alongside Frank Black in the Pixies, a band in which she never received credit she deserved.
While Pixies is often name-checked for inspiring the likes of Nirvana to embrace dramatic dynamic shifts, Kurt Cobain bemoaned that more of Kim’s songwriting wasn’t featured on their albums.
It left no question about her talents, as the album sold more than Frank’s solo debut or any of the Pixies’ albums.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Women Aren’t C.E.O.s, According to Women Who Almost Were”

After years of biting their tongues, believing their ranks would swell if they simply worked hard, many senior women in business are concluding that the barriers are more deeply rooted and persistent than they wanted to believe, according to interviews with nearly two dozen chief executives, would-be chief executives, headhunters, business school deans and human resources professionals.
A Lean In/McKinsey & Company survey in 2016 of 132 companies and 34,000 employees found that women who negotiated for promotions were 30 percent more likely than men to be labeled intimidating, bossy or aggressive.
“They can smell it in the water, that women are not going to play the same game. Those men think, ‘If I kick her, she’s not going to kick back, but the men will. So I’ll go after her.’ It’s keeping women in their place. I truly believe that.”
In a Korn Ferry survey in April of 786 male and female senior executives, 43 percent said they thought that continued bias against women as chief executives was the primary reason more women did not make it to the top in their own companies – and 33 percent thought women in their firms were not given sufficient opportunities to become leaders.
The bleakest perceptions are from minority women; only 29 percent of black women think the best opportunities at their companies go to the most deserving employees, compared with 47 percent of white women.
Many women work in companies with public commitments to diversity and clear policies against discrimination, with many men who sincerely believe they want women to advance.
She and other women describe a culture in which men sometimes feel hesitant to give women honest but harsh feedback, which can be necessary for them to ascend, because they fear women may react emotionally.
The fury and revulsion aimed at Mrs. Clinton – as well as the more open misogyny in some quarters in the wake of the election – has led many women to question whether they’ve underestimated a visceral recoil against women taking power in any arena.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Real Men Might Get Made Fun Of”

If you care, how often do you say something? Maybe you’ll confront your close friends, but what about more powerful men, famous men, cool men, men who could further your career?
One of the subtlest and most pervasive is social ostracism – coding empathy as the fun killer, consideration for others as an embarrassing weakness and dissenting voices as out-of-touch, bleeding-heart dweebs.
Women, already impeded and imperiled by sexism, also have to carry the social stigma of being feminist buzzkills if they call attention to it.
In contrast to these “Warriors,” promises a world in which you can have it both ways: You can be good without ever seeming uncool in front of your buddies, you can be an advocate for social justice without ever considering there might be social forces beyond your ken, you can be a crusader for positive change without ever killing anyone’s buzz, you can be a progressive hero without ever taking identity politics seriously.
It’s an ambitious contortion, and one that affords straight white men a luxurious degree of stasis.
What if fixing Pao’s toxic workplaces hadn’t fallen to her alone? I’m frequently contacted by young women weighing the benefits and costs of calling out sexism in their male-dominated industries.
One of my podcasting friends told me that he does stick up for women in challenging situations, like testosterone-soaked comedy green rooms but complained, “I get mocked for it!”.
I know there’s pressure not to be a dorky, try-hard male feminist stereotype; there’s always a looming implication that you could lose your spot in the club; if you seem opportunistic or performative in your support, if you suck up too much oxygen and demand praise, women will yell at you for that too.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Sell a Billion-Dollar Myth Like a French Girl”

French Girl Organics, which is sold at Anthropologie and Williamsburg jewelry mecca Catbird, is neither the work of a Parisian It girl nor a clever marketing team, but rather a 60-something Seattle resident named Kristeen Griffin-Grimes who has a warm, ready laugh and an unpretentious demeanor.
Her first foray into French Girl anything was writing French Girl Knits, a book of knitting patterns that took inspiration from French film and history.
Listening to Griffin-Grimes effuse about the kindness she encountered while traveling around the French countryside or the locals’ pride in their history, it becomes impossible to reproach her for using the French Girl name.
We’re now facing a host of non-French brands with French-sounding names, a trend that Fashionista documented in 2015 in a story titled “Why Are There So Many Fake French Brands in Fashion?” The list includes Glossier, La Garçonne, Agent Provocateur, and Journelle, and their founders’ reasons for doing so range from feeling inspired by French style to seeking legitimacy through the country’s history as a fashion powerhouse to simply liking how the words sound.
Of them, Être Cécile is perhaps the most flagrant about tapping into the French Girl craze, and the most attuned to how silly it all is.
“The term ‘French woman’ epitomizes everything women want to be: sexy, stylish, thin, great conversationalist, slightly maverick, very seductive, very badly behaved. It’s all quite glamorous and appealing,” says Helena Frith Powell, the British author of All You Need to Be Impossibly French: A Witty Investigation Into the Lives, Lusts, and Little Secrets of French Women.
On a good day, self-care, an old concept that’s currently of great interest to millennials, is exactly what the myth of the French Girl promotes.
The French Girl myth can also reinforce the belief that there is, and always will be, a more perfect form of womanhood than whatever you have going on.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Instagram Food Is a Sad, Sparkly Lie”

That’s not only because Instagram is a widely used and intensely visual medium, but also because its emergent aesthetic tropes are as essential to the zeitgeist as baby tees and brown lipstick were to the 90s. Food thrives on social networks because of its easy, graphic appeal and pan-demographic interest – we all have to eat, right? But while Facebook has become a repository of time-lapse recipe videos for quick weeknight dinners that often prominently feature, for some reason, canned biscuit in dough, and Pinterest traffics largely in mason jars, do-it-yourself projects and the protein-packed simplicity of an egg baked inside half an avocado, Instagram has thrown its lot in with spectacle.
Over-the-top, intensely trend-driven, and visually arresting, Instagram food is almost always something to be obtained, rather than cooked or created.
In the most successful of Instagram food operations, the posting of a particular item signals both affluence and leisure.
Instagram food has almost nothing to do with consumption as a gastronomic endeavor; instead, consuming Instagram food means acquiring it, and sharing proof of your acquisition.
As far as I can tell, it’s nearly impossible be popular in the world of Instagram food maximalism if you actually look like a person who eats the things you post; otherwise, your probably fat hand might appear in a photo of an ice cream cone held out in front of a brick wall.
The easiest way to create context for an over-the-top food purchase is to show it next to a body that has not succumbed to fatness, the prospect of which is regarded with as much horror on influencer Instagram as it is in the rest of celebrity culture.
Iturregui told me she’s seen plenty of food thrown away at influencer-focused food events, a claim backed up by my friend Eric Mersmann, who has made the rounds as an ice cream Instagrammer in New York.
For the others, watching their timelines fill up with food feels more transparently performative, like a present-day version of Paris Hilton in the early 2000s, remaining impossibly thin and toned while regularly being photographed acquiring fast food.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Work and Reward: The Great Disconnect”

Over the same period, the median lifetime income of women increased by 22 percent to 33 percent, as more women spent more hours and years in the labor force.
Will lifetime income continue to lag? The answer appears to be yes.
The researchers found that declining lifetime income among men after 1967 was almost entirely attributable to lower incomes at younger ages, without any offsetting increases at later ages.
Among women, the gains in lifetime income had slowed over time, in large part because of slowing growth after age 45.
Since today’s workers face those same trends, the same downward trend in lifetime income is likely.
As workers lose ground, inequality deepens, because money that would flow to wages tends to flow instead to those at the top of the income ladder.
The researchers found that incomes of younger workers entering the labor market are more unequal than in the past, suggesting that inequality in lifetime incomes will persist and even worsen.
Updated overtime pay standards would raise pay broadly in the service sector, as would closing the gender pay gap, through better disclosure of corporate pay scales, anti-discrimination legislation and litigation.

The orginal article.

Summary of “U.S. Fertility Rate Reaches a Record Low”

The present overall fertility rate puts the United States population below replacement level, but that does not mean the population is declining.
“Yes, it’s below replacement level, but not dramatically so,” Dr. Brady said.
The birthrate for women ages 30 to 34 rose by 1 percent over the 2015 rate, and the rate for women ages 35 to 39 went up by 2 percent, the highest rate in that age group since 1962.
Women ages 40 to 44 also had more babies, up 4 percent from 2015.
The rate for women 45 to 49 increased to 0.9 births per thousand from 0.8 in 2015.The birthrate among unmarried women went down, to 42.1 per 1,000 from 43.5 in 2015, a drop of 3 percent and the eighth consecutive year of decline since the peak of 51.8 in 2007 and 2008.There were differences by race: 28.4 percent of white babies had unmarried parents, 69.7 percent of black babies and 52.5 percent of Hispanics.
The preterm birthrate – babies born before 37 weeks of gestation – increased to 9.84 percent from 9.63 percent in 2015.
This is the second year in a row of increases in preterm birth after a decline of 8 percent from 2007 to 2014.The highest rate of preterm birth was among non-Hispanic blacks, at 13.75 percent, and lowest among Asians, at 8.63 percent.
In 2016, 31.9 percent of births were by cesarean section, compared with 32 percent in 2015.

The orginal article.