Summary of “Real Men Might Get Made Fun Of”

If you care, how often do you say something? Maybe you’ll confront your close friends, but what about more powerful men, famous men, cool men, men who could further your career?
One of the subtlest and most pervasive is social ostracism – coding empathy as the fun killer, consideration for others as an embarrassing weakness and dissenting voices as out-of-touch, bleeding-heart dweebs.
Women, already impeded and imperiled by sexism, also have to carry the social stigma of being feminist buzzkills if they call attention to it.
In contrast to these “Warriors,” promises a world in which you can have it both ways: You can be good without ever seeming uncool in front of your buddies, you can be an advocate for social justice without ever considering there might be social forces beyond your ken, you can be a crusader for positive change without ever killing anyone’s buzz, you can be a progressive hero without ever taking identity politics seriously.
It’s an ambitious contortion, and one that affords straight white men a luxurious degree of stasis.
What if fixing Pao’s toxic workplaces hadn’t fallen to her alone? I’m frequently contacted by young women weighing the benefits and costs of calling out sexism in their male-dominated industries.
One of my podcasting friends told me that he does stick up for women in challenging situations, like testosterone-soaked comedy green rooms but complained, “I get mocked for it!”.
I know there’s pressure not to be a dorky, try-hard male feminist stereotype; there’s always a looming implication that you could lose your spot in the club; if you seem opportunistic or performative in your support, if you suck up too much oxygen and demand praise, women will yell at you for that too.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Sell a Billion-Dollar Myth Like a French Girl”

French Girl Organics, which is sold at Anthropologie and Williamsburg jewelry mecca Catbird, is neither the work of a Parisian It girl nor a clever marketing team, but rather a 60-something Seattle resident named Kristeen Griffin-Grimes who has a warm, ready laugh and an unpretentious demeanor.
Her first foray into French Girl anything was writing French Girl Knits, a book of knitting patterns that took inspiration from French film and history.
Listening to Griffin-Grimes effuse about the kindness she encountered while traveling around the French countryside or the locals’ pride in their history, it becomes impossible to reproach her for using the French Girl name.
We’re now facing a host of non-French brands with French-sounding names, a trend that Fashionista documented in 2015 in a story titled “Why Are There So Many Fake French Brands in Fashion?” The list includes Glossier, La Garçonne, Agent Provocateur, and Journelle, and their founders’ reasons for doing so range from feeling inspired by French style to seeking legitimacy through the country’s history as a fashion powerhouse to simply liking how the words sound.
Of them, Être Cécile is perhaps the most flagrant about tapping into the French Girl craze, and the most attuned to how silly it all is.
“The term ‘French woman’ epitomizes everything women want to be: sexy, stylish, thin, great conversationalist, slightly maverick, very seductive, very badly behaved. It’s all quite glamorous and appealing,” says Helena Frith Powell, the British author of All You Need to Be Impossibly French: A Witty Investigation Into the Lives, Lusts, and Little Secrets of French Women.
On a good day, self-care, an old concept that’s currently of great interest to millennials, is exactly what the myth of the French Girl promotes.
The French Girl myth can also reinforce the belief that there is, and always will be, a more perfect form of womanhood than whatever you have going on.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Instagram Food Is a Sad, Sparkly Lie”

That’s not only because Instagram is a widely used and intensely visual medium, but also because its emergent aesthetic tropes are as essential to the zeitgeist as baby tees and brown lipstick were to the 90s. Food thrives on social networks because of its easy, graphic appeal and pan-demographic interest – we all have to eat, right? But while Facebook has become a repository of time-lapse recipe videos for quick weeknight dinners that often prominently feature, for some reason, canned biscuit in dough, and Pinterest traffics largely in mason jars, do-it-yourself projects and the protein-packed simplicity of an egg baked inside half an avocado, Instagram has thrown its lot in with spectacle.
Over-the-top, intensely trend-driven, and visually arresting, Instagram food is almost always something to be obtained, rather than cooked or created.
In the most successful of Instagram food operations, the posting of a particular item signals both affluence and leisure.
Instagram food has almost nothing to do with consumption as a gastronomic endeavor; instead, consuming Instagram food means acquiring it, and sharing proof of your acquisition.
As far as I can tell, it’s nearly impossible be popular in the world of Instagram food maximalism if you actually look like a person who eats the things you post; otherwise, your probably fat hand might appear in a photo of an ice cream cone held out in front of a brick wall.
The easiest way to create context for an over-the-top food purchase is to show it next to a body that has not succumbed to fatness, the prospect of which is regarded with as much horror on influencer Instagram as it is in the rest of celebrity culture.
Iturregui told me she’s seen plenty of food thrown away at influencer-focused food events, a claim backed up by my friend Eric Mersmann, who has made the rounds as an ice cream Instagrammer in New York.
For the others, watching their timelines fill up with food feels more transparently performative, like a present-day version of Paris Hilton in the early 2000s, remaining impossibly thin and toned while regularly being photographed acquiring fast food.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Work and Reward: The Great Disconnect”

Over the same period, the median lifetime income of women increased by 22 percent to 33 percent, as more women spent more hours and years in the labor force.
Will lifetime income continue to lag? The answer appears to be yes.
The researchers found that declining lifetime income among men after 1967 was almost entirely attributable to lower incomes at younger ages, without any offsetting increases at later ages.
Among women, the gains in lifetime income had slowed over time, in large part because of slowing growth after age 45.
Since today’s workers face those same trends, the same downward trend in lifetime income is likely.
As workers lose ground, inequality deepens, because money that would flow to wages tends to flow instead to those at the top of the income ladder.
The researchers found that incomes of younger workers entering the labor market are more unequal than in the past, suggesting that inequality in lifetime incomes will persist and even worsen.
Updated overtime pay standards would raise pay broadly in the service sector, as would closing the gender pay gap, through better disclosure of corporate pay scales, anti-discrimination legislation and litigation.

The orginal article.

Summary of “U.S. Fertility Rate Reaches a Record Low”

The present overall fertility rate puts the United States population below replacement level, but that does not mean the population is declining.
“Yes, it’s below replacement level, but not dramatically so,” Dr. Brady said.
The birthrate for women ages 30 to 34 rose by 1 percent over the 2015 rate, and the rate for women ages 35 to 39 went up by 2 percent, the highest rate in that age group since 1962.
Women ages 40 to 44 also had more babies, up 4 percent from 2015.
The rate for women 45 to 49 increased to 0.9 births per thousand from 0.8 in 2015.The birthrate among unmarried women went down, to 42.1 per 1,000 from 43.5 in 2015, a drop of 3 percent and the eighth consecutive year of decline since the peak of 51.8 in 2007 and 2008.There were differences by race: 28.4 percent of white babies had unmarried parents, 69.7 percent of black babies and 52.5 percent of Hispanics.
The preterm birthrate – babies born before 37 weeks of gestation – increased to 9.84 percent from 9.63 percent in 2015.
This is the second year in a row of increases in preterm birth after a decline of 8 percent from 2007 to 2014.The highest rate of preterm birth was among non-Hispanic blacks, at 13.75 percent, and lowest among Asians, at 8.63 percent.
In 2016, 31.9 percent of births were by cesarean section, compared with 32 percent in 2015.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Great White Celebrity Vacuum”

Call it a great white celebrity vacuum – or the continued erosion of old-school, white star power.
The white celebrity vacuum suggests that ideals and expectations of womanhood, and white womanhood in particular, are in flux.
The overarching reason has much more to do with how the election – and the fact that 53% of white women voted for Trump – has revealed the fault lines in the celebrity-sustained myth of the well-intentioned white woman.
Put differently, it’s increasingly hard for many women – women of color, but also white women – to trust or idealize white women.
White women in our everyday lives, white women as voters, white women on juries, and, by extension, white female celebrities, who have repeatedly fumbled or ignored the conversations of race, class, and gender that, in this hyperpoliticized moment, seem most vital and urgent.
No celebrity emblematizes this general distrust in white celebrity – and the well-intentioned, yet inwardly focused white woman in particular – more than Taylor Swift.
Swift grew up upper-middle class in Wyomissing, Pennsylvania – a deeply white suburb of Reading, Pennsylvania, that, like many other white suburbs, swung from voting for Obama in 2008 to Trump in 2016.
There might be a white female celebrity around the corner, just waiting to make people feel better about white women in America today.

The orginal article.

Summary of “It’s Not Just Mike Pence. Americans Are Wary of Being Alone With the Opposite Sex.”

In recent news about Uber and Fox News, women see cautionary tales about being alone with men.
Others described caution around people of the opposite sex, and some depicted the workplace as a fraught atmosphere in which they feared harassment, or being accused of it.
“Temptation is always a factor,” said Mr. Mauldin, 29.One reason women stall professionally, research shows, is that people have a tendency to hire, promote and mentor people like themselves.
Over all, people thought dinner or drinks with a member of the opposite sex other than a spouse was the most inappropriate, with more people disapproving than approving.
Fewer than two-thirds of respondents said a work meeting alone with a member of the opposite sex was appropriate; 16 percent of women and 18 percent of men with postgraduate degrees said it was inappropriate.
People who lived in rural areas, people who lived in the South or Midwest, people with less than a college education and people who were very religious, particularly evangelical Christians.
Shelby Wilt, 22, of Gilbert, Ariz., said she and her boyfriend socialize alone with friends of the opposite sex.
“Organizations are so concerned with their legal liabilities, but nobody’s really focused on how to reduce harassment and at the same time teach men and women to have working relationships with the opposite sex,” said Kim Elsesser, author of “Sex and the Office: Women, Men and the Sex Partition That’s Dividing the Workplace.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “deadspin-quote-carrot-aligned-w-bgr-2‘)}.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote:before,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote:before,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.entry-content.pullquote:before,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.entry-content.pullquote:before,.f branding on.f branding deadspin on.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote:before,.f branding on.f branding deadspin on.entry-content.pullquote:before{top:-4px}.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote:after,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote:after,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.entry-content.pullquote:after,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.entry-content.pullquote:after,.f branding on.f branding deadspin on.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote:after,.f branding on.f branding deadspin on.entry-content.pullquote:after{bottom:-4px;-webkit-transform:rotate(180deg);transform:rotate(180deg)}.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper,.f branding on.f branding deadspin on.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper,.f branding on.f branding deadspin on.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper{display:block;position:absolute;width:100%}.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:first-child,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:first-child,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:first-child,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:first-child,.f branding on.f branding deadspin on.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:first-child,.f branding on.f branding deadspin on.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:first-child{top:0}.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:last-child,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:last-child,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:last-child,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:last-child,.f branding on.f branding deadspin on.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:last-child,.f branding on.f branding deadspin on.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:last-child{bottom:6px}.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:after,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:after,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:before,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:before,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:after,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:after,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:before,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:before,.f branding on.f branding deadspin on.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:after,.f branding on.f branding deadspin on.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:before,.f branding on.f branding deadspin on.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:after,.f branding on.f branding deadspin on.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:before{display:block;content:”;height:9px;width:18px;position:absolute;top:-1px;background-color:#fff}.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:before,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:before,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:before,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:before,.f branding on.f branding deadspin on.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:before,.f branding on.f branding deadspin on.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:before{left:0}.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:after,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:after,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:after,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:after,.f branding on.f branding deadspin on.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:after,.f branding on.f branding deadspin on.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:after{right:0}.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:last-child:after,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:last-child:after,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:last-child:before,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:last-child:before,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:last-child:after,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:last-child:after,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:last-child:before,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:last-child:before,.f branding on.f branding deadspin on.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:last-child:after,.f branding on.f branding deadspin on.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:last-child:before,.f branding on.f branding deadspin on.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:last-child:after,.f branding on.f branding deadspin on.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:last-child:before{top:-2px}.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:first-child:after,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:first-child:after,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:first-child:before,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:first-child:before,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:last-child:after,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:last-child:after,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:last-child:before,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:last-child:before,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:first-child:after,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:first-child:after,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:first-child:before,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:first-child:before,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:last-child:after,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:last-child:after,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:last-child:before,.f branding on.blog-group-deadspin.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:last-child:before,.f branding on.f branding deadspin on.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:first-child:after,.f branding on.f branding deadspin on.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:first-child:before,.f branding on.f branding deadspin on.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:last-child:after,.f branding on.f branding deadspin on.editor-inner.post-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:last-child:before,.f branding on.f branding deadspin on.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:first-child:after,.f branding on.f branding deadspin on.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:first-child:before,.f branding on.f branding deadspin on.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:last-child:after,.f branding on.f branding deadspin on.entry-content.pullquote.pullquote helper:last-child:before{background-image:url(‘data:image/svg+xml;utf8,

“Female players of D&D, AD&D and other role-playing games are finding it necessary to cope with discrimination and prejudice as they seek the satisfaction and fulfillment they are entitled to receive from playing a role in an adventure game”.
In the July 1980 issue of Dragon magazine, TSR’s official D&D publication, Jean Wells and her colleague Kim Mohan penned the editorial, “Women Want Equality. And Why Not?” Women from across the country had written in about the “Unfair and degrading treatment of women players,” who comprised, they wrote, about 10 percent of D&D’s fanbase.
“Female players of D&D, AD&D and other role-playing games are finding it necessary to cope with discrimination and prejudice as they seek the satisfaction and fulfillment they are entitled to receive from playing a role in an adventure game,” Wells and Mohan wrote.
On TSR’s third floor throughout the late ’70s and early ’80s, Wells or Williams would happily hop into one or another of their colleagues’ constant stream of D&D games.
Despite D&D’s constant presence in the office, playing the game held no interest for many of TSR’s early female employees.
Rose Estes, whom TSR hired in 1977, says D&D’s culture, or at least its manifestation on TSR’s third floor, did not appeal to her.
Women were the champions of TSR’s books department, a much-celebrated division that published novels inspired by D&D’s dragon-slaying, court intrigue and daredevil dungeon-crawling adventures.
Rose Estes, who had been a “Hippie, a student, a newspaper reporter and an advertising copy writer,” later struggled to help TSR’s growing books department catch D&D’s winds.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Women in Tech Speak Frankly on Culture of Harassment”

The tech industry has long suffered a gender imbalance, with companies such as Google and Facebook acknowledging how few women were in their ranks.
The investor has been accused of sexually harassing entrepreneurs while he worked at three different venture firms in the past seven years, often in meetings in which the women were presenting their companies to him.
Several of Silicon Valley’s top venture capitalists and technologists, including Reid Hoffman, a founder of LinkedIn, condemned Mr. Caldbeck’s behavior last week and called for investors to sign a “Decency pledge.” Binary has since collapsed, with Mr. Caldbeck leaving the firm and investors pulling money out of its funds.
The chain of events has emboldened more women to talk publicly about the treatment they said they had endured from tech investors.
Ms. Pao lost the case, but it sparked a debate about whether women in tech should publicly call out unequal treatment.
“Having had several women come out earlier, including Ellen Pao and me, most likely paved the way and primed the industry that these things indeed happen,” said Gesche Haas, an entrepreneur who said she was propositioned for sex by an investor, Pavel Curda, in 2014.
At a mostly male tech gathering in Las Vegas in 2009, Susan Wu, an entrepreneur and investor, said that Mr. Sacca, an investor and former Google executive, touched her face without her consent in a way that made her uncomfortable.
“After being made aware of instances of Dave having inappropriate behavior with women in the tech community, we have been making changes internally,” 500 Startups said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Men Don’t Want to Be Nurses. Their Wives Agree.”

In theory, nursing should appeal to men because it pays fairly good wages and is seen as a profession with a defined skill set.
Just 10 percent of nurses are men, despite “Are You Man Enough to Be a Nurse?” posters and other efforts to enlist men.
The hope is to focus on millennials who may be less bound by notions of traditional masculinity, said Brent MacWilliams, president of the American Assembly for Men in Nursing and a former commercial fisherman who is now an associate professor of nursing at Wisconsin-Oshkosh.
He has seen more men apply to nursing schools, but he acknowledges his group will fall short of its goal of 20 percent male nurses by 2020.Nursing and teaching, another growing field dominated by women, may require levels of education or training that can be daunting for those men who were less successful in school but made a good living in manufacturing.
Just 20 percent of the students are men, although that represents an increase from 10 percent 15 years ago.
Men who become home health care aides are more often minorities, according to Janette S. Dill, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Akron who has studied gender and the health care industry.
“I sometimes wonder if health organizations don’t want men to come into these jobs because they’ll demand higher wages,” Professor Dill said.
“We need to reinvent pink-collar jobs so men will take them and won’t be unhappy – or women, either.”

The orginal article.