Summary of “Is Yogurt Healthy?”

Whenever I’ve been prescribed antibiotics, I’ve always been told to eat a yogurt so that the antibiotics don’t eat up all the “Good” bacteria in my system and leave me with a yeast infection.
Breath bad? According to a 2005 study, you should eat six ounces of yogurt a day.
A pair of new studies suggest there might be something about yogurt after all.
It’s not really clear how the yogurt was reducing the inflammation.
Childs told me it’s not really clear how often people have to eat yogurt or probiotics to see benefits from them.
“The results were mixed and not uniformly positive, and the elevated sugar content in yogurt may have clouded possible benefits.” Plus, he added, if the “Eating challenge” the women were given had been a healthier meal, instead of the sausage sandwiches, they might not have seen as significant of an anti-inflammatory benefit from the yogurt.
Maybe, if you have an otherwise healthy diet, yogurt and its healthy microbes could nudge you toward even better health by reducing inflammation.
There’s little risk attached to eating yogurt anyway.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Marti Noxon Wants to Put Angry Women on TV”

On a soundstage in Queens, New York, the crew for Marti Noxon’s new TV series Dietland has built an extremely realistic replica of the offices of a modern women’s magazine.
At 53, Noxon has written, produced, and directed TV shows and films for more than two decades, but it’s only now, right now, that the stories she’s really interested in are stories that Hollywood wants to tell.
Joss Whedon, the creator of the cult hit Buffy the Vampire Slayer-which Noxon worked on as a writer and producer for six seasons, until the series’ finale in 2003-dubbed her the “Chains-and-pain gal.” Gillian Flynn, who wrote the novel Sharp Objects, describes Noxon as an “Amazing force wrapped in this kind of calm, pleasant package, but also, don’t fuck with her.”
If a singular thread runs through Noxon’s work, it’s the assertion that women can be just as complex as men-that they can make catastrophic decisions, put themselves in danger, damage others, and damage themselves.
Buffy’s own struggles preceded the darker stories about women that have emerged in recent years, in shows including Jessica Jones, Fleabag, Insecure, Big Little Lies, Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, and UnREAL-an Emmy-nominated series, co-created by Noxon, that makes its own meta-commentary on the portrayal of women in entertainment.
Until Noxon left Buffy, a show she describes as “This little enclave of feminist thought and respect for female voices,” she didn’t fully realize how male-dominated the TV industry was.
Noxon is on the fence about how much women in Hollywood should expect from this particular moment, though.
As soon as Noxon proposed making Sharp Objects into a TV show, “It was like the shackles on the storytelling fell off.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Gossip explains our culture. And nobody explains it like Lainey Gossip.”

As Elaine Lui Ubers across downtown Toronto one Thursday night in March, the phone of the Internet’s most trusted gossip glows with a tip: Some grimy website has obtained naked pictures of Meghan Markle, Prince Harry’s bride-to-be.
Lui isn’t tempted to run them on Lainey Gossip, the website she runs that bears her name and has become something of a mecca for anyone looking for the best, most insightful coverage of celebrities.
“The conversation about celebrity gossip is a conversation about ourselves, not about the subject,” Lui says.
Lui knows gossip is typically dismissed as a shallow pastime, described using synonyms for garbage: trash, junk, a waste of time and energy.
Though she didn’t realize it then, Lui was part of an Internet gossip wave, launching her site around the same time as Perez Hilton, dlisted, Just Jared and PopSugar – a fleet of voice-y, irreverent, online-only upstarts that were about to disrupt the entire celebrity gossip industry.
“If the purpose of gossip is to have a bigger conversation about values, we need a Taylor,” Lui says.
Lui returns to a thread she’s been tugging on these past few days: that the real reason gossip is met with such contempt is because it is a feminized space.
“Is my goal to make men take gossip seriously? I wouldn’t say that, every day, that is my goal,” Lui says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Children of the Opioid Epidemic”

In Wisconsin, a pregnant woman who told her doctor she had successfully weaned herself off painkillers was forced onto methadone in 2013 by a skeptical judge who decided she still needed treatment – thus needlessly putting her baby at risk for NAS.Widespread horror at the thought of newborns in withdrawal has led, some experts feel, to a cultural overreaction reminiscent of the “Crack baby” hysteria of the late 1980s and early 1990s, which wildly overstated the negative effects cocaine would have on the children of pregnant women who smoked it.
The gathering of women was billed as a baby shower, but mostly it was a chance for pregnant clients to meet one another and talk with representatives of First Connections and Healthy Families America: groups that support high-risk women, including opioid users, and their newborns.
Much of the discussion among the women centered on neonatal abstinence syndrome: dread and guilt at the idea of their babies experiencing withdrawal; stories about friends whose babies had to go through it.
On any given day, there are usually seven or eight babies being treated in the nursery for NAS. The fact that the babies are in a nursery puts Women and Infants at the vanguard of NAS care; a vast majority of babies in withdrawal around the country are still treated apart from their mothers in NICUs, a protocol that is now widely seen as counterproductive.
Of the five other babies being treated for NAS alongside her daughter, Elizabeth told me, four were in the temporary custody of the Rhode Island D.C.Y.F. – meaning that the state was trying to determine if each parent was capable of providing a safe home for the baby.
“We didn’t have the strength to get clean before,” Ashley told me, “But something in us, when we had the baby, I felt like God was giving us an opportunity. A way out. Like: You guys could be sober and have a baby and have a life. We didn’t think we could do it.”
Each morning, Elizabeth drove with her baby to Codac for her methadone, leaving the baby with a nurse or receptionist while she provided urine for a tox screen or waited in line for her dose.
“You often have a family that has multiple stressors, could have child welfare involved, early-intervention services, Mom’s addiction care, baby’s care, Mom’s opioid care. It’s just a lot. And I don’t think we coordinate that care very well throughout the U.S. I think oftentimes we set up families for failure as opposed to giving them the tools they need to succeed.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Every Culture Appropriates”

Customs we may think of as immemorially inherent in one culture very often originated in that culture’s own history of empire and domination.
The Chinese dress young Kezia Daum wanted to wear to prom originated in a brutal act of imperialism, but not by any western people.
They have a morality tale to tell, one of Western victimization of non-Western peoples-a victimization so extreme that it is triggered by a Western girl’s purchase of a Chinese dress designed precisely so that Chinese girls could live more like Western girls.
Why not? The would-be culture police build their whole philosophy on a single assumption of extreme chauvinism: that Western culture is universal-indeed the only universal culture.
Western technology, the Western emphasis on individual autonomy and equal human dignity, and even such oddly specific Western practices as death-metal music-the cultural police take all this for granted as thoroughly as a fish takes for granted the water in its fishbowl.
The various coverings voluntarily adopted by some women in North America and Western Europe evolved in societies where 90 percent of the population still agrees that women must obey their husbands at all times.
Their individual decision to wear a traditional garment has already changed that garment’s cultural context and put it to a new and very Western use.
The Western culture of personal autonomy and equal dignity is a precious thing precisely because it is not universal.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How the music industry overlooked R. Kelly’s alleged abuse of young women”

He is far from the only industry figure who worked with Kelly and benefited from the partnership, even as a cloud of allegations – mostly involving the sexual abuse of young women – began to grow around the star.
Kelly continued to settle with more women as allegations against him mounted, but music industry luminaries remained silent, instead smiling for pictures alongside him at platinum record ceremonies.
In his 2012 memoir “Soulacoaster: The Diary of Me,” Kelly described a childhood wracked by abuse and neglect.
Robert Sylvester Kelly grew up in the Chicago projects, his father gone before his birth, his working mother often leaving him in a house chaotic with “Cousins, aunties, friends of my aunties.” One day, Kelly stumbled upon two people having sex; they called him in and told him he could watch.
In response to questions about Kelly’s relationship with Aaliyah, Kelly’s management team said the following: “As is well known, Mr. Kelly wrote and produced Aaliyah’s recordings. Their collaboration created great music and the world along with Mr. Kelly mourned the loss of her great talent.”
The accounts of Kelly’s routines and household details come from former staffers, court documents, text messages and six women – Tracy Sampson, Patrice Jones, Jerhonda Pace, Asante McGee, Kitti Jones, and Lisa Van Allen – who spoke to The Washington Post about their relationships with Kelly.
Kelly’s management said the allegation of “Rules” was “Absolutely false” and added: “Why are you asking Mr. Kelly to speak for women who can speak for themselves?”.
In the statement provided to The Post, Kelly’s management team said: “Mr. Kelly will never stand between a parent and a child. If a child is an adult, that communication is between them. All of these women are adults and make their own choices.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Psychology Behind Why We Like Long, Dark Eyelashes”

The Everything Guide to Eyelashes is a week of stories on the Cut about lashes, from all the mascaras we’ve obsessively tested to our personal feelings about why eyelashes matter.
Long and sweeping enough to brush the lenses of his sunglasses and attract compliments from old ladies, his lashes embarrassed him: Weren’t long eyelashes for girls? Didn’t they make you pretty? He was a boy.
Long eyelashes are in no technical or biological sense a lady thing.
Still, eyelashes have managed to become one of the few types of female body hair to make it into the “Good, emphasize” category and not the “Bad, eliminate” one – and for centuries, we’ve been imagining the presence of long, dark eyelashes to signify feminine beauty of the highest order.
Eyelashes have also historically been associated with chastity – ancient Roman naturalist Pliny the Elder suggested, rather amusingly in hindsight, that women’s eyelashes could fall out if they had too much sex.
Why? More recent research points toward the notion that long eyelashes are valuable for the illusion they create of wide, gazing eyes.
Still, these theories explain little about why long or full eyelashes are considered feminine.
“What eyelashes do is like what lipstick does, and eyelashes may actually even do it more: They draw a contrast between the eye itself and the eyelid, like lipstick draws attention to the contrast between the lips and the surrounding area.” Attractiveness indicators in men, she says – facial features whose larger size and more striking definition suggest a man possesses traditionally “Masculine” qualities, like confidence and assertiveness – are more likely to be the eyebrows and jawline.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Marathon World Record Holder the World Forgot”

Maybe it’s the fact that she was a tiny 13-year-old running her first marathon and stepped unnoticed onto the unpaved Eastern Canadian Marathon Championships course.
Amby Burfoot, winner of the 1968 Boston Marathon and a former Runner’s World editor, says it’s crucial to put Mancuso’s run in historical context.
Prior to lining up that morning, Mancuso was a devoted and talented cross-country and track runner, training five or six days a week with her brother and the local running club.
Mancuso went into the race knowing she could break the world record by running 7:30-mile pace.
Despite her showing that day, she says the officials didn’t even name her run a world record at the finish line, because she was too young to qualify for records.
While the marathon already wasn’t her favorite distance, Mancuso says the controversy over her race didn’t help.
Mancuso returned to her track and cross-country training and competed at the World Cross-Country Championships in Scotland when she was 15.
She gave the marathon two more shots in 1968, but because they weren’t a priority for her, Mancuso didn’t properly train for them and didn’t come close to matching her previous performances.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Wall Street’s Biggest Gender Lawsuit Is 13 Years in the Making”

Dermody was relaying news that Chen-Oster, a former vice president at Goldman Sachs, had been awaiting for years.
A federal judge in New York had ruled that she and three other women who claim there’s systematic gender discrimination at Goldman can now represent as many as 2,300 other current and former employees.
A few months before Chen-Oster left Goldman, rival investment bank Morgan Stanley agreed to settle a sex discrimination case for $54 million.
Chen-Oster, the bank argued, hadn’t made it clear from the beginning that she was suing on behalf of other women and it called out her use of “Me” and “My” in her complaint to the EEOC. Goldman lost that one.
Goldman used the Dukes case to attack, saying Chen-Oster’s was so similar that it should be dismissed without wasting the court’s time.
If Chen-Oster wanted Goldman to change, it looked like she’d have to get current bank employees to join her case.
In the decision Chen-Oster would read in a Broadway theater, she ruled that Chen-Oster, Orlich, Gamba, and De Luis could represent female associates and vice presidents who have worked in three divisions at Goldman in the U.S. since September 2004 and in New York since July 2002.
In a telling sign of where things stand for women on Wall Street, Goldman bragged that its 2016 partner class was 23 percent female, its most diverse yet.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: ‘This could be the beginning of a revolution'”

The atmosphere at a recent event with Reni Eddo-Lodge, part of the Southbank’s WOW: Women of the World festival in London, was more like a party than a books evening.
The excitement among the audience of largely young women was as striking as the amazing hair and outfits.
“It’s either the beginning of a revolution, or it is going to be a fad. We just don’t know I do see in women a sense that ‘We’re done, this is it … No.’ and it gives me hope.”
Although the “You” in the letter is “Ijeawele”, a Nigerian mother living in a traditional Igbo culture, Adichie is talking to young women the world over: “To get letters from women, saying ‘you make me feel stronger’ that means a lot to me,” she says.
One group who didn’t seem swayed by how much they found Clinton likable was black American women, 90% of whom voted for her in the election.
“There were white women who were therefore able to overlook his very blatant misogyny because he appealed to their whiteness.”
“There are so many women for whom pregnancy is the thing that pushed them down, and we need to account for that. We need to have a clause in every job that a woman who gets pregnant gets her job back in exactly the same way. It’s wrong!” For her, gender is a social construction: “I don’t think I’m more inherently likely to do domestic work, or childcare … It doesn’t come pre-programmed in your vagina, right?”.
She expected a degree of hostility – “Feminist is a bad word, everywhere in the world, let’s not kid ourselves, but particularly where I come from.” But she was not prepared for the furore that followed an interview on Channel 4 last year when she sparked controversy by arguing that the experiences of trans women are distinct from those of women born female, which was interpreted by some as “Creating a hierarchy” and implying that “Trans women were ‘less than’, which I was not … I don’t think that way.”

The orginal article.