Summary of “Denis Villeneuve Is the Sci-Fi Remake Master with Blade Runner 2049 and the Upcoming Dune”

When Arrival made the awards-season rounds last year, director Denis Villeneuve was already eyebrows-deep into making Blade Runner 2049, the Ryan Gosling-led sequel to Ridley Scott’s 1982 cult favorite, Blade Runner.
Instead he’s still fielding questions about Blade Runner 2049.
With Blade Runner, you inherited a pre-existing visual world.
On Blade Runner, I needed the dialogue and to bounce ideas quickly.
Some critics accused the “World” in Blade Runner 2049 of being hostile to women.
The first Blade Runner was quite rough on the women; something about the film noir aesthetic.
Blade Runner is not about tomorrow; it’s about today.
The first Blade Runner is the biggest dystopian statement of the last half century.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why 2020 Will Be the Year of the Woman”

Democrats, who have been unsparing to their own in this post-Weinstein moment, may be hungering for a Year of the Women 2.0-one that tells male Democrats to take a backseat for once and catapults a woman into the Oval Office.
She’s likely to have an early advantage: The 2020 Democratic primary landscape looks to be tilted to another woman presidential nominee.
In such a crowded field, if a woman is going to lead the party, she will have to overcome some major obstacles, probably including one or two old white dudes and a few other women with the same bright idea.
Outrage alone is not going to produce another Year of the Woman.
Harris-the daughter of immigrants from Jamaica and India-is the only woman of color seriously mentioned as a 2020 candidate, having instantly attracted presidential buzz upon her election to the Senate last year.
If she runs in 2020, her challenge is to convince progressive primary voters that to get Middle America to accept a woman president, you need someone from Middle America more than you need ideological purity tests.
It’s a sign of how far women have come in the Democratic Party that more than one woman is positioned to make a serious run for the presidency in 2020.
For a woman to win in 2020, she can’t be a pedestrian politician.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Bad News on ‘Good’ Girls”

Girls are taught to protect themselves from predation, and they internalize the message that they are inherently vulnerable; boys move through the world not nearly as encumbered and certainly not seeing their own bodies as sources of weakness or objects for others’ desires.
While girls are being told to protect themselves, too many boys are growing into the men they need to be protected from.
Girls are more likely to be praised for being good, while boys are commended for making an effort.
Dads sing to daughters more than sons, and the language they use with their girls is more analytical and emotive, something researchers suspect contributes to girls’ higher achievement in school.
While girls are being taught to be emotionally competent, they also learn to be responsive to the needs of others – not a bad thing in theory, except that it can cross over into subservience.
According to one study, nearly a quarter of teenage girls and 40 percent of teenage boys said men make better political leaders than women; just 8 percent of girls and 4 percent of boys said women are better leaders.
What could make a big difference is raising boys more like our girls – fostering kindness and caretaking, not just by telling them to respect women, but by modeling egalitarianism and male affection and emotional aptitude at home.
What girls don’t learn is how to be the solo aviators of their own perfect, powerful bodies – to happily inhabit their own skin instead of seeing their physical selves as objects to be assessed and hopefully affirmed by others; to feel entitled to sex they actively desire themselves, instead of positioned to either accept or reject men’s advances.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Judge Ruchie, the Hasidic Superwoman of Night Court”

Judge Freier felt she could do all that was expected of her as a Hasidic woman – and be a judge, a paramedic and a voice for change, too.
“Everyone was waiting to see, ‘What is she going to do?” Judge Freier said of the wary attitude toward her after she became a judge.
In a narrow hallway, Judge Freier conferred briefly with another female judge about a case.
In the Bible, there is a female judge in the Book of Judges: Devora, or Deborah, a prophetess who calls the Israelites to battle.
There has not been a female ultra-Orthodox judge for centuries, certainly not within the Hasidic movement, which was founded in 18th-century Eastern Europe.
Judge Freier recalled that her rebbetzin told her, “If God gave us Devora, the judge, if we have that in our history, that means that Ruchie Freier should be a judge. That’s it!”.
She does not want to be a judge in a religious rabbinical court, a strictly male domain that rules over many civil matters for ultra-Orthodox Jews.
Just after 5 p.m., Judge Freier took the bench.

The orginal article.

Summary of “New York Times’ Glenn Thrush has a history of bad judgment with young female reporters”

Sexual harassment claims against yet another powerful man in media inspired New York Times White House correspondent Glenn Thrush to post an impassioned note on his Facebook page in October, calling on his fellow journalists to stand by women entering the field.
Thrush, 50, is one of the New York Times’s star White House reporters whose chronicles of the Trump administration recently earned him and his frequent writing partner Maggie Haberman a major book deal.
If Thrush is acutely aware of what young women face in the business of political journalism, he should also know it’s because he himself is one of the problems women face.
Three young women I interviewed, including the young woman who met Thrush in June, described to me a range of similar experiences, from unwanted groping and kissing to wet kisses out of nowhere to hazy sexual encounters that played out under the influence of alcohol.
Some reporters said Thrush had used his connections to help them land jobs or develop new sources.
Multiple young women journalists I spoke to said that they’d heard serious warnings about Thrush from friends.
In his emailed statement, Thrush said that the night in June with the young woman was the last time he’s had a drink.
By the time of the June incident, Thrush was gone from Politico anyway – off to the New York Times, which has hired many of Politico’s top reporters over the years.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Billion-Dollar Bumble: How Whitney Wolfe Herd Built America’s Fastest-Growing Dating App”

When Whitney Wolfe Herd started planning an October launch party for a new product at Bumble, America’s fastest-growing dating-app company, she was deliberate in her choice of venue: the Manhattan space that for 57 years hosted the Four Seasons restaurant, where regulars like Henry Kissinger, Vernon Jordan, Edgar Bronfman and Stephen Schwarzman created the ultimate power lunch.
While Andreev liked the idea of a women-centric social brand, he thought Herd should stick to her forte and his: the dating sector.
One night, over cocktails, Herd stumbled upon Bumble’s special sauce.
The new office reflects that, from posters and neon signs espousing various Bumble mantras like “You’re a Queen Bee,” “Be the CEO Your Parents Always Wanted You to Marry” and “Make the First Move.” When Bumble hands out its cream-and-yellow sweaters as gifts at events – the familiar honeycomb logo on the front, along with the word “Honey” – there’s invariably a scramble.
The bee theme and Bumble’s signature yellow are front and center in the app, which works like this: When two users of the opposite sex match by swiping right on each other’s profile, the woman must send her potential date a message first or the connection is void.
By giving women control over the initial contact, Bumble feels more polite and walled-off than competitors, avoiding the unsolicited photos – including the occasional male genitalia – that plague online dating.
The publicly traded company, which in addition to Tinder owns Match.com, OkCupid, PlentyOfFish and other niche dating sites, would clearly like to add Bumble to its roster.
Herd wouldn’t comment on the attempted buyouts, but selling to Tinder’s parent and folding Bumble under the same corporate umbrella would, of course, serve as a poetic coda to the ugliness of 2014.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Billion-Dollar Bumble: How Whitney Wolfe Herd Built America’s Fastest-Growing Dating App”

When Whitney Wolfe Herd started planning an October launch party for a new product at Bumble, America’s fastest-growing dating-app company, she was deliberate in her choice of venue: the Manhattan space that for 57 years hosted the Four Seasons restaurant, where regulars like Henry Kissinger, Vernon Jordan, Edgar Bronfman and Stephen Schwarzman created the ultimate power lunch.
While Andreev liked the idea of a women-centric social brand, he thought Herd should stick to her forte and his: the dating sector.
One night, over cocktails, Herd stumbled upon Bumble’s special sauce.
The new office reflects that, from posters and neon signs espousing various Bumble mantras like “You’re a Queen Bee,” “Be the CEO Your Parents Always Wanted You to Marry” and “Make the First Move.” When Bumble hands out its cream-and-yellow sweaters as gifts at events – the familiar honeycomb logo on the front, along with the word “Honey” – there’s invariably a scramble.
The bee theme and Bumble’s signature yellow are front and center in the app, which works like this: When two users of the opposite sex match by swiping right on each other’s profile, the woman must send her potential date a message first or the connection is void.
By giving women control over the initial contact, Bumble feels more polite and walled-off than competitors, avoiding the unsolicited photos – including the occasional male genitalia – that plague online dating.
The publicly traded company, which in addition to Tinder owns Match.com, OkCupid, PlentyOfFish and other niche dating sites, would clearly like to add Bumble to its roster.
Herd wouldn’t comment on the attempted buyouts, but selling to Tinder’s parent and folding Bumble under the same corporate umbrella would, of course, serve as a poetic coda to the ugliness of 2014.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Money Diaries, Where Millennial Women Go to Judge One Another’s Spending Habits”

It is Money Diaries, a column, from the life-style site Refinery29, in which anonymous young professional women document every penny they earn and spend in a week-on Uber rides, lattes, birthday gifts, impulse-buy candy bars at the Walgreens register.
Money Diaries launched in January of 2016, premised on the idea that “The first step to getting your financial life in order is tracking what you spend.” By encouraging young women to record their expenditures, and to discuss their finances frankly, Refinery29 could, the theory goes, help young women become savvier about money.
Thus Money Diaries was established as a place where millennial women stand before their peers to await harsh judgment.
Money Diaries initially featured mainly affluent women from cities such as New York and Los Angeles, but it soon began sprinkling in entries from women earning less, and in smaller towns and cities.
Women in stable relationships are treated more harshly, while women from small or rural towns are revered, particularly if they live modestly and get to bed early.
This might all seem like an ongoing experiment in stereotypical female cruelty, demonstrating how harshly women judge each other, and underscoring the complex tangle of Schadenfreude and resentment with which women sometimes regard one another’s careers.
Money Diaries is careful to include women with large student-loan bills to pay down and parents’ mortgages to contribute to, but the column still seems to exist largely in a comfortable urban bubble.
Millennial women have experienced a minor cultural revolution and a major economic panic within their young life spans.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Tech Industry’s Gender-Discrimination Problem”

At Tesla, as at many tech companies, gallows humor prevailed among some of the women.
In 2015, a group of female tech investors and executives conducted a survey of two hundred senior-level women in Silicon Valley.
“Men who demean, degrade or disrespect women have been able to operate with such impunity-not just in Hollywood, but in tech, venture capital, and other spaces where their influence and investment can make or break a career,” Melinda Gates, the co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, told me.
The broader public got one of its first glimpses of the particular hostility women face in the tech world in 2014, with Gamergate, when several women in the video-game industry, including the game critic Anita Sarkeesian, were targeted by an angry mob online.
The problem of racial disparity is often inextricably tied to gender disparity, and minority women may be doubly targeted, with both racism and sexism.
“Women are tired of not being taken seriously, and attending ridiculous seminars on how women can get ahead. How about we work on the men? It’s been a long time of talking about skill-building for women, but men aren’t making room, and they’re treating women in a sexualized way and not paying them fairly. And you can never catch up.”
At McKinsey, Minshew said, it was clear that, to some of the firm’s clients, “As a very young female analyst I was there to get the coffee, and the young men were assumed to be the math geniuses or the tech whizzes.” In 2011, she co-founded the Muse, which was initially aimed at early-career women looking for advice on everything from asking for raises to dealing with difficult bosses.
Minshew, the founder of the Muse, told me she was hopeful that the public conversation about women in tech would help reshape the culture.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How the ‘Shalane Flanagan Effect’ Works”

Instead of being threatened by her teammates’ growing accomplishments, Flanagan embraced them, and brought in more women, elevating them to her level until they become the most formidable group of distance athletes in the nation.
“I thoroughly enjoy working with other women,” Flanagan told me.
On a searing day in Los Angeles at the United States Olympic marathon trials in February 2016, Flanagan and her teammate Amy Cragg broke away from the pack early in the race.
Cragg slowed down and urged her on, pacing her over the few final miles and even fetching her water so Flanagan could conserve energy, a remarkable demonstration of support on a racecourse.
Flanagan barely made it across the finish line, where she collapsed into Cragg’s arms.
Flanagan does not just talk about elevating women; she elevates them.
The Flanagan kind of feminism – a ruthless adherence to goals – rarely makes for interesting stories in the moment.
Flanagan boldly acknowledged the work she put into her marathon training and was unabashed about wanting to win before the race.

The orginal article.