Summary of “What do men and women want in a partner? How gender equality is changing our mating preferences”

Wouldn’t we expect these changing relationship mores to make a dent in the mating preferences of straight men and women? Or are we still at the mercy of our biological destiny, as evolutionary psychologists claim?
Are we still at the mercy of our biological destiny, as evolutionary psychologists claim? The results from the research are clear: mating preferences among men and women look increasingly similar.
The trend is directly tied to increasing gender equality, as women gain greater access to resources and opportunities in business, politics and education.
In more gender-unequal nations, such as Turkey, women rate the earning potential of partners as twice as important compared with women in the most gender-equal nations, such as Finland.
The more gender-unequal men’s personal attitudes, the more they prefer qualities in women such as youth and attractiveness; and the more gender-unequal women’s attitudes, the more they prefer qualities in men such as money and status.
The results from the research are clear: mating preferences among men and women look increasingly similar.
Gender equality isn’t considered to be one of these factors, since even in relatively gender-equal societies, the gap between men and women’s preferences is only reduced, not eliminated.
What if a society actually did achieve perfect gender equality? Would women and men hold essentially identical partner preferences? My hunch is that women’s and men’s choices might never completely converge.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Hospitals Are Failing Black Mothers”

Researchers have found that women who deliver at these so-called “Black-serving” hospitals are more likely to have serious complications – from infections to birth-related embolisms to emergency hysterectomies – than mothers who deliver at institutions that serve fewer black women.
A complicating factor in understanding how hospital care figures in is that hospitals take on different proportions of tough cases – patients who have less access to consistent, quality prenatal care or have chronic health issues, like diabetes or heart disease, that make pregnancy and childbirth riskier.
The California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative, which studies maternal deaths and develops techniques to prevent them, looks at how well hospitals respond to obstetric hemorrhage, typically defined as losing more than 500 milliliters of blood during a vaginal birth or a liter of blood during a cesarean section.
In New York, if black mothers represented roughly a third or more of the deliveries at a hospital, we considered the hospital high black-serving.
While a handful of low black-serving hospitals had high complication rates, our analysis found that, on average, outcomes at hospitals that served a high number of black patients were far worse.
In New York, on average, high black-serving hospitals had complication rates 21 percent higher than low black-serving hospitals.
She found black mothers were twice as likely to suffer harm when delivering babies than white mothers, even after adjusting for patients’ differing characteristics, suggesting that some of the racial disparity may be due to hospital quality.
Because three quarters of black mothers deliver in about a quarter of the country’s hospitals, Howell believes that racial disparities could be reduced if hospitals that disproportionately serve black women improved their care.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Women Who Run the ‘Star Wars’ Universe”

Early on, the story group fought for the character Ahsoka Tano, a 14-year-old girl created by George Lucas and further developed by the director, producer and writer Dave Filoni.
Characters like Ashoka Tano are gaining prominence in the “Star Wars” universe.
Even more promising, in “Rogue One” nonwhite characters accounted for 44.7 percent of all dialogue, a marked increase from zero in the 1977 original.
Where his research distinguishes the “Star Wars” saga is not in its lines of dialogue, but in the centrality of its female characters.
The laboratory’s character network visualization software is able to tease out each individual character interaction.
The more interactions characters have, the more vital they are to the plot.
The team found that in the vast majority of Hollywood scripts, women play mere accessory roles, their characters inessential to plot development.
Ms. Hart credits Mr. Johnson with the decision to introduce diverse characters for “The Last Jedi.” Of the new cast members, several are women, including Rose Tico, played by Kelly Marie Tran, the first Asian-American women to star in the saga.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Are High Heels Headed for a Tumble?”

At the avant-garde retail temple Opening Ceremony, which opened in 2002, fanciful sneakers, slippers and oxfords greatly outnumber high heels.
Women throughout the European courts began to adopt high heels in the 16th century.
A 1959 article in this newspaper proclaimed that “Pat Nixon’s political trademark around the world might well be her high heels.” Ahead of a trip to the Soviet Union with her husband, then vice president, a friend suggested that Mrs. Nixon pack a pair of “Sensible walking shoes.” Her response? “I’ve worn high heels in a lot rougher places.”
While she goes high, others in her position have often gone low with their heels.
“I love wearing high heels – I think it’s beautiful, it’s sexy, whatever,” she said.
Last year, in The New Yorker, the writer Mary Karr called for the uninvention of high heels.
Two companies led by women have developed ergonomic high heels whose insoles are designed to promote stability and even weight distribution, and prevent heel-related hospital visits.
In the film “Jurassic World” starring Bryce Dallas Howard, her character outruns a Tyrannosaurus rex in high heels.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Keila Pulinario Thought Prison Was Tough. Then She Had To Find A Job.”

Not long after Keila Pulinario was released from prison, she was hit by a car while walking to work.
Pulinario had spent nearly every day of her sentence working: as a cook, a prison day care staff member, a porter, a builder in the industry program.
One friend’s boss, a professor who studies effects of mass incarceration, was at the exhibit; when that boss heard Pulinario’s idea, she told Pulinario she was hosting an event for 70 people the next week.
Pulinario entered prison in 1997, when New York City’s subways still took tokens instead of MetroCards, and before anyone had heard of Google, Facebook, or Twitter.
“Everything is overwhelming, and no one really gets that,” said Pulinario, who lived with relatives on Long Island for the first three months after prison.
After those three months, Pulinario moved to Queens to join Hour Children, a kind of halfway house for women coming out of prison, which had a six-month program to help residents learn technological skills and break into the job market.
Her friend had already recommended Pulinario to her boss, which Pulinario knew gave her an advantage.
During Pulinario’s sentence, women inmates settled a class-action lawsuit that changed pat-frisk policies in the state so that female correctional officers would perform them whenever possible over male officers, and inmates like Pulinario who had a history of sexual trauma could demand a woman every single time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “U.S. Black Mothers Die In Childbirth At Three Times The Rate Of White Mothers”

On a melancholy Saturday this past February, Shalon Irving’s “Village” – the friends and family she had assembled to support her as a single mother – gathered at a funeral home in a prosperous black neighborhood in southwest Atlanta to say goodbye.
Sprays of callas and roses dotted the room like giant corsages, flanking photos from happier times: Shalon in a slinky maternity dress, sprawled across her couch with her puppy; Shalon, sleepy-eyed and cradling the tiny head of her newborn daughter, Soleil.
Three weeks after giving birth, Shalon collapsed and died from complications of high blood pressure.
What’s more, even relatively well-off black women like Shalon Irving die and nearly die at higher rates than whites.
Shalon Irving’s history is almost a textbook example of the kinds of strains and stresses that make high-achieving black women vulnerable to poor health.
Shalon had spent her adult years defying stereotypes about black women; now she wrestled with the reality that by embracing single motherhood, she could become one.
Steeped in research about how social support could buffer against stress and adversity, Shalon joined online groups for single mothers and assembled a stalwart community she could quickly deploy for help.
Like a lot of expectant mothers, Shalon had an elaborate plan for how she wanted to give birth, even including what she wanted her surgical team to talk about and who would announce the baby’s gender.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Cost of Devaluing Women”

What we are only beginning to recognize is that demeaning and devaluing women is an insidious, expensive problem.
Wall Street has for years prided itself on being a “Meritocracy,” arguing that its performance-based culture drives capital to the best trading ideas and the best deals.
Despite research showing that companies with more diversity, and particularly more women in leadership, offer higher returns on capital, lower risk and greater innovation than firms without such leadership, Wall Street has been, and is, predominantly male at the top.
Homogeneity has led Wall Street firms to travel in packs, going after the same opportunities at the same time: junk bonds in the 1980s, tech stocks in the late 1990s and subprime lending in the run-up to the crash 10 years ago.
Thus one can draw a line from the gender discrimination on Wall Street through to the lack of women – and lack of diversity of thought – in the industry to increased risk and to the financial crisis.
Silicon Valley today is rife with parallels to Wall Street, its lessons unlearned.
Like Wall Street, it prides itself on its meritocratic culture, arguing that its performance-based orientation will drive capital to the best start-ups.
There are few senior women at the top venture capital firms.

The orginal article.

Summary of “From Politics to Scandals, Sports Seem to Speak to Our Times”

The popularity of the rediscovered historical sports narrative, la “Seabiscuit” and “The Boys in the Boat,” has sent microfilm reels spinning, and Roseanne Montillo’s FIRE ON THE TRACK: Betty Robinson and the Triumph of the Early Olympic Women brings to light the accomplishments of women track athletes of nearly a century ago, who struggled to overcome old-boy resistance and misogynistic discrimination in pursuing their goals.
I found a balm for Sharapovian self-absorption in Simon Critchley’s slim WHAT WE THINK ABOUT WHEN WE THINK ABOUT SOCCER, whose title is an obvious nod to Haruki Murakami’s “What I Talk About When I Talk About Running” and whose green cover seems copied from last year’s David Foster Wallace collection of tennis writing, “String Theory.” I admit to being a sucker for this kind of intellectual maundering about the meaning of sports, but I know plenty of sports fans can’t stand it.
My favorite book of the bunch, and the one that best captures the American sports landscape in these times, is not about any competition on the field but about the landscape-clearing constructions where the games take place.
THE ARENA: Inside the Tailgating, Ticket-Scalping, Mascot-Racing, Dubiously Funded, and Possibly Haunted Monuments of American Sport, by the freelance writer Rafi Kohan, is smart, readable, deeply reported and researched, engagingly personal, funny and often surprisingly poignant.
Kohan traverses the country from Green Bay’s Lambeau Field to New York’s Citi Field to San Diego’s Petco Park, embedding with the stadium Everymen and Everywomen who are the nobodies of the sports world.
Amid a section on the Dallas Cowboys’ stadium in Arlington, Texas, Kohan describes over-the-top amenities like a $15 million sculpture by Anish Kapoor, but the section also undertakes a comprehensive, cogent survey of the literature on stadium economics.
Kohan’s penultimate chapter is called “Sex. War. America,” and it covers the way that sports has appropriated and intermixed that triad to tease out emotion and profit, portrayed memorably in Ben Fountain’s novel “Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk,” based on the Dallas Cowboys’ 2004 Thanksgiving Day halftime show.
Fountain tells him, “Just seeing the display of militarism, American exceptionalism, pop music, soft-core porn all mixed together in this kind of crazy to-do – I started feeling like it was its own kind of voodoo.” Kohan also reminds us of a 2015 report from Senators Jeff Flake and John McCain revealing undisclosed payments from the Department of Defense to teams in order to fund military tributes, what Kohan calls “Camouflaged propaganda.” The issue, for the senators and others, was one of transparency.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What ‘Godless’ Says About America”

What can the Western, that hoary, craggy old relic, a staple of TCM movie marathons and Disneyland saloon experiences, say about life in contemporary America? Godless, written and directed by Scott Frank for Netflix, and executive produced by Steven Soderbergh, is a gorgeous, slyly subversive affirmation of the genre’s power, even if it isn’t quite the “Feminist Western” it was marketed as.
The series is built around an inevitable showdown between Frank Griffin and Roy Goode-a battle between Goode and evil.
Roy is his protegĂ© turned mortal enemy, an orphan whom Frank unofficially adopted as his favorite son, and whose desertion precipitated Frank’s most heinous act yet: the murder of an entire town, the wreckage of which is detailed in the opening scene.
“Roy Goode betrayed me, and I will kill any man, woman, or child who harbors him,” Frank tells a terrified newspaper editor in the second episode.
Frank is the dark core of the story, pitted against Roy, against Marshal Cook, and against Bill McNue, La Belle’s sheriff, whose deputy is a gangly kid named Whitey Winn.
“You are no man of God!” her husband cries out, observing Frank’s dog collar.
There are groups of men wearing buffalo heads who traffic children and violate women, and Mormons dressed as Native Americans who killed Frank’s parents, raped his sister, and then adopted young Frank, teaching him that “Things were purified with blood.” Frank’s own band of brothers is made up of misfits whom he’s saved from horrific situations and taken up as family.
In one scene, Frank even steps into a house that a town has abandoned, helping the residents, who’ve been struck by an infectious fever.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Denis Villeneuve Is the Sci-Fi Remake Master with Blade Runner 2049 and the Upcoming Dune”

When Arrival made the awards-season rounds last year, director Denis Villeneuve was already eyebrows-deep into making Blade Runner 2049, the Ryan Gosling-led sequel to Ridley Scott’s 1982 cult favorite, Blade Runner.
Instead he’s still fielding questions about Blade Runner 2049.
With Blade Runner, you inherited a pre-existing visual world.
On Blade Runner, I needed the dialogue and to bounce ideas quickly.
Some critics accused the “World” in Blade Runner 2049 of being hostile to women.
The first Blade Runner was quite rough on the women; something about the film noir aesthetic.
Blade Runner is not about tomorrow; it’s about today.
The first Blade Runner is the biggest dystopian statement of the last half century.

The orginal article.