Summary of “I Spent Two Years Trying to Fix the Gender Imbalance in My Stories”

Two of the technique’s pioneers, Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna, are women, and both of them spoke at the same conference from which I reported.
Of the people she mentioned across 136 articles, just 25 percent were women.
Gender biases are also entrenched in the media, where, in the words of the sociologist Gaye Tuchman, women are being “Symbolically annihilated.” As Adrienne noted in her piece, “Both in newsrooms and in news articles, men are leaders-they make more money, get more bylines, spend more time on camera, and are quoted far more often than women.” Again, there’s plenty of data on this.
I’ve since been trying to actively redress the balance, by spending more time searching for women to interview.
To find more female sources, I just spend a little more time on all of the above-ending the search only when I have a list that includes several women.
Four months after I started, the proportion of women who have a voice in my stories hit 50 percent, and has stayed roughly there ever since, varying between 42 and 61 percent from month to month.
For the first year, I also tracked the number of people whom I asked for an interview, to check if I was actually contacting men and women in equal numbers and simply receiving a skewed set of replies.
Every single person I contact is qualified to speak about the particular story that I’m writing; it’s just that now, half of those qualified people happen to be women.

The orginal article.

Summary of “My four days at sea with New Kids on the Block and 3,000 everlasting fans”

Any moment now the New Kids on the Block are going to appear, and then they’re not going to leave for the next four days, and we’re all going to sail to Cozumel, Mexico, and back.
Girls liked the New Kids on the Block, and boys mocked the New Kids on the Block, because that’s what boys do when they’re jealous.
They had New Kids T-shirts and New Kids pillowcases and New Kids buttons on their Esprit bags, and they stood at their lockers spraying Aqua Net on their huge hair while staring at the dreamy pictures of Donnie Wahlberg and Jordan Knight they had cut out of Tiger Beat and taped all over their doors.
I went to their show at Fenway a few years later, and then again last summer – in both instances, I was the one who bought the tickets and “Dragged” people there for the time of their lives – and as I stood in the grandstand at Fenway in July, looking out at the vibrating hordes of ex-teenage girls, I realized that I did not exactly love the New Kids on the Block, at least not in the way of the diehard fans.
“And as a journalist,” I tell the Australian woman who didn’t know she was going to get such a long answer, “I started poking around to try to figure out how I could tell the story of the New Kids on the Block now, and everyone kept telling me I had to go on the cruise. So here I am.”
Most of the women I talk with have happily spent closer to $1,500 for the cruise, not counting the booze and the latest New Kids merch and the airfare from as far away as Japan and Germany and Chile and England, all for their chance to spend four days this close to the boys who were and still are their ultimate.
During Jeopardy! – where the band takes on five fans in New Kids trivia – he can’t wait to get off the stage, at one point interjecting this after a question a fan had answered about a lyric from a 1994 song: “I’m a New Kid, and even I didn’t know that.”
There were definitely a few women you had to keep an eye on, because when you think of the fact that this is the New Kids cruise, which naturally draws the most rabid New Kids fans on the planet, there are bound to be a few psychos.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Brigitte Adams helped launch the egg-freezing movement. But her frozen eggs failed.”

Brigitte Adams caused a sensation four years ago when she appeared on the cover of Bloomberg Businessweek under the headline, “Freeze your eggs, Free your career.” She was single and blond, a Vassar graduate who spoke fluent Italian, and was working in tech marketing for a number of prestigious companies.
Adams remembers feeling a wonderful sense of freedom after she froze her eggs in her late 30s, despite the $19,000 cost.
After the 44-year-old Honolulu-based writer got married, she tried to use her frozen eggs.
Reproductive health specialists sometimes describe the success rates of thawing eggs, fertilizing them and transferring them to the womb as resembling an inverted pyramid: You start with a certain number of eggs and lose some at every step.
After losing the rest of her eggs, Lee had another set of twins using eggs donated by her younger sister and, last week, she gave birth to a fifth child also using a donor egg.
That painful March day, when the last of her frozen eggs failed to produce a pregnancy, Adams said she realized how one-sided the conversation about egg freezing had been, and how little information was available about what she calls “Part two” – when you actually try to use those eggs to get pregnant.
Only a few such studies exist: A 2016 Fertility and Sterility study of 137 women who tried to use their frozen eggs found that women who froze 10 eggs at the age of 36 faced a 30 percent likelihood of achieving a live birth.
Second, Adams said many clinics sell women on a single egg retrieval procedure without mentioning that more may be needed to harvest enough eggs to produce a successful pregnancy.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Men Who Want to Live Forever”

I recall thinking that if this was eternal life, death didn’t seem that bad.But now, as powerful men have begun falling like dominoes under accusations of sexual assault, that video with its young women clustered around an elderly multimillionaire has haunted me anew.
As I recall my discomfort with the proclamations of longevity-driven men who hope to achieve “Escape velocity,” I think of the astonishing hubris of the Harvey Weinsteins of the world, those who saw young women’s bodies as theirs for the taking.
It’s only very recently that women have widely participated in public life, but it’s even more recently that men have been welcome, or even expected, to provide physical care for vulnerable people.
Only for a nanosecond of human history have men even slightly shared what was once exclusively a woman’s burden: the relentless daily labor of caring for another person’s body, the life-preserving work of cleaning feces and vomit, the constant cycle of cooking and feeding and blanketing and bathing, whether for the young, the ill or the old.
The most obvious cure for today’s gender inequities is to put more women in power.
If we really hope to create an equal society, we will also need more men to care for the powerless – more women in the boardroom, but also more men at the nurses’ station and the changing table, immersed in daily physical empathy.
Men who hope to live forever might pause on their eternal journey to consider the frightening void at invincibility’s core.
It is the moment when all of us must confront exactly what so many women have known all too well: You are a body, only a body, and nothing more.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why American men are getting less marriageable”

Somewhere between 1979 and 2008, Americans decided it was much less worth it to get hitched: the share of 25 to 39-year-old women who were currently married fell 10 percent among those with college degrees, 15 percent for those with some college, and a full 20 percent for women with a high school education or less.
These blue collar gigs were and are special: they pay more than comparable jobs at that education level in the service sector, and they deliver way more than just a paycheck.
Spouses tend to be less happy, more likely to think the marriage is in trouble, and more likely to discuss separation if the wife outearns her husband, as well.
“Either men don’t like their female partners earning more than they do,” Dorn says, or women feel like “If the man doesn’t bring in more money, then he’s an underachiever.”
As manufacturing jobs are lost, there are also increases to mortality in men aged 18 to 39, Dorn says, with more deaths from liver disease, indicative of alcohol abuse; more deaths from diabetes, related to obesity; and lung cancer, related to smoking-not to mention drug overdoses.
The precarious situation that American men face has a lot to do with the nature of the jobs they’re doing.
“The lack of good jobs for these men is making them less and less attractive to women in the marriage market, and women, with their greater earnings, can do fine remaining single,” says Bertrand, the Chicago economist.
Eventually, she adds, gender norms “Will adjust to the new realities” that are already present in the economy: women are getting better educations and are more employable, and the work opportunities that are growing are-for now-thought to be feminine.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Can’t People Hear What Jordan Peterson Is Actually Saying?”

My first introduction to Jordan B. Peterson, a University of Toronto clinical psychologist, came by way of an interview that began trending on social media last week.
The Peterson interview has so many moments of this kind that each successive example calls attention to itself until the attentive viewer can’t help but wonder what drives the interviewer to keep inflating the nature of Peterson’s claims, instead of addressing what he actually said.
“Women deeply want men who are competent and powerful,” Peterson goes on to assert.
Peterson: I’m not saying that they should put up with it! I’m saying that the claim that the wage gap between men and women is only due to sex is wrong.
The interviewer seemed eager to impute to Peterson a belief that a large, extant wage gap between men and women is a “Fact of life” that women should just “Put up with,” though all those assertions are contrary to his real positions on the matter.
Peterson: I’m saying it is inevitable that there will be continuities in the way that animals and human beings organize their structures.
Where did she get that extreme “And there’s nothing we can do about it”? Peterson has already said that he’s a clinical psychologist who coaches people to change how they related to institutions and to one another within the constraints of human biology.
Almost all of the most inflammatory views that were aired in the interview are ascribed by Newman to Peterson, who then disputes that she has accurately characterized his words.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Wielding Data, Women Force a Reckoning Over Bias in the Economics Field”

The bias creeps into the most popular introductory economics textbooks, which refer to men four times as often as they do women.
The reckoning in economics comes amid a larger national examination of bias and abuse toward women in the work force, across industries including entertainment, manufacturing and journalism.
The existence of bias in the field of economics is rattling a profession that, at its core, functions through objective interpretation and extrapolation of data, statistics and evidence.
Many economists said that those steps were late, and that they left much work to be done to ensure fairness for women in the field, where the rate of entry for women lags that of math, engineering and other hard sciences.
In interviews during and after the conference, prominent women in economics described how their profession throws barriers in their professional paths, and they criticized the male-dominated leadership in the field for moving slowly to tear those barriers down.
Janet Currie, chairwoman of Princeton’s economics department, and Claudia Goldin, an economist at Harvard, pointed to a recent study that found that women get significantly less credit than men when they co-write papers with them, as reflected in the way the paper affects their chances of receiving tenure.
Kate Bahn, an economist at the Center for American Progress, said that when she was in graduate school, she was told she was not invited to a regular poker game with her male cohorts, because it included “Locker-room talk.” She also noticed that her specialties, labor and gender economics, were viewed as more associated with women, and thus less rigorous.
Ms. Sharpe, of the N.E.A., said the bias against African-American women, who continue to make up a tiny slice of the economics profession, was especially pronounced.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Do algorithms reveal sexual orientation or just expose our stereotypes?”

The results show that lesbians indeed use eyeshadow much less than straight women do, gay men and women do both wear glasses more, and young opposite-sex-attracted men are considerably more likely to have prominent facial hair than their gay or same-sex-attracted peers.
Similar analysis shows that young same-sex attracted men are much less likely to have hairy faces than opposite-sex attracted men.
Overall, opposite-sex attracted men in our sample are 35% more likely to have serious facial hair than same-sex attracted men, and for men under the age of 31, this rises to 75%.Wang and Kosinski speculate in their paper that the faintness of the beard and moustache in their gay male composite might be connected with prenatal underexposure to androgens, resulting in a feminizing effect, hence sparser facial hair.
Overall, opposite-sex attracted men are 29% more likely to work outdoors, and among men under 31, this rises to 39%. Previous research has found that increased exposure to sunlight leads to darker skin!
While this is interesting, it’s very far from a good predictor of women’s sexual orientation.
In one of the earliest “Gaydar” studies using social media, participants could categorize gay men with about 58% accuracy; but when the researchers used Facebook images of gay and heterosexual men posted by their friends, the accuracy dropped to 52%.If subtle biases in image quality, expression, and grooming can be picked up on by humans, these biases can also be detected by an AI algorithm.
As with less facial hair on gay men and darker skin on straight men, they suggest that the mechanism is gender-atypical hormonal exposure during development.
It can reveal uncomfortable truths, as in Google’s work with the Geena Davis Institute, where our face gender classifier established that men are seen and heard nearly twice as often as women in Hollywood movies.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Serena Williams’s terrifying childbirth story”

Serena Williams, the world’s greatest tennis player and new mother, graces the cover of Vogue magazine for February, together with her daughter, Alexis Olympia Ohanian Jr, who at three months is the youngest Vogue cover model ever.
In the cover story, Williams talks about her new life as a mom and wife, her career ambitions and how motherhood will affect each of those things.
The piece also shares a terrifying episode, in which Williams tells the story of delivering her child, the days that followed, and how she risked dying.
Only hours after giving birth through a major surgery, Williams needed to convince the medical personnel that she was in need of care-and run them through what she needed.
Because her history of blood clots made her aware of the symptoms, Williams was able to save her own life.
With a shockingly high maternal-mortality rate, Williams’s story will likely sound familiar to many women and all the more to black American women, who are three times more likely to die or suffer serious illness from pregnancy-related causes than white women, with at least 40 deaths per 100,000 live births on average, compared to 14 for white mothers.
What’s more, what Williams had to go through is especially revealing about the medical bias faced by black women.
Even Serena Williams, whose body, as her husband correctly notes, “Is one of the greatest things on this planet,” is just another black woman when it comes to being heard in the maternity ward-and when it comes to being dismissed.

The orginal article.

Summary of “You Don’t Need a Daughter to Want a Better World”

Many women respond by projecting what they want onto their daughters.
The problem isn’t an aspiration to make the world a better place for one’s children; it’s that women don’t feel quite as entitled to make the world a better place for themselves.
Often, what we say we want for our daughters are the same things we also seek.
Who doesn’t want the world to be better for girls? Girls are an easy sell.
When we do pursue what we crave, the consequences of saying so out loud can be stark: pity the poor woman foolish enough to say that she doesn’t want children because she’d rather spend her money traveling the world, or had an abortion because she just did not want a baby, or admits she took the job because she craved power, or rejects marrying the nice guy because she would rather date and sleep with whomever she pleases.
Without meaning to, we feed into the same norms that keep the world a hostile place for women who want a good and fair life.
Do we want our daughters to spend their lives fencing themselves in so that they might better cater to others? Do we want our daughters to live their lives primarily in the service of their daughters?
If not, then we should treat ourselves with the love and adoration we bestow on our girls and start demanding what we actually want, right now.

The orginal article.