Summary of “Why You Should Manage Your Energy, Not Your Time”

A workplace study found an average working professional experiences 87 interruptions per day, making it difficult to remain productive and focused for a full day.
Knowing something had to give, Congdon began to adjust her approach to work and restructured her day to achieve the same amount of output, without working around the clock.
The key to maintaining focus and energy in shorter bursts was to apply flexibility to those segments – she could use some for exercise, some for meditation, some for work.
Getting rest within her workday helped lower stress levels and therefore achieve better results within the allotted time for working, Congdon found.
While our culture may be pushing us towards working 24/7, Alex Soojung-Kim Pang, a Silcon Valley consultant and author of Rest: Why You Get More Done When You Work Less, believes this is not helping us to be more productive or to come up with creative solutions.
There are a number of approaches to mastering the art of deep work – be it lengthy retreats dedicated to a specific task; developing a daily ritual; or taking a ‘journalistic’ approach to seizing moments of deep work when you can throughout the day.
In the past, Justin Gignac, co-founder of freelance network Working Not Working, left little room in his routine to be lazy.
Now, he believes it is important to build time to kick back and let his brain think by itself, and is one of many successful people debunking the myth that working more equals working best.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Baby Boomers’ retirement savings are running dry”

West Allis, just outside Milwaukee, was once the headquarters of the Allis-Chalmers Co., which manufactured industrial machinery, employed 31,000 unionized workers in Wisconsin and elsewhere, supported a solid standard of living for its workers for nearly eight decades, and paid them pensions when they retired.
Only about one-quarter of employed Americans work continuously through their 50s and their early 60s in jobs with benefits, according to a study by the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College.
“If older workers can’t work in high-contact areas,” said Teresa Ghilarducci, who studies aging and employment issues at the New School University in New York, “Employers will have to make accommodations for them.” That’s an expense.
That’s what befell Gregory Bates – and he’s only 61.Bates went to work for the local utility company in Milwaukee – now called WE Energies – when he was 18, as a file clerk, and, after four years in the Air Force, eventually worked his way up to budget analyst.
Just 40 percent of working Americans aged 55-64 participate in a job-related retirement plan, according to a Stanford University study.
With 401(k)s and other individual savings accounts, which collectively are more expensive to manage than a pension plan, each worker has to provide for an unknowable number of years in retirement.
Her son, who works for a company that makes environmentally friendly doors, works from home now and has had his hours cut back.
“The hardest part,” said his wife Tammy, 57, who is unable to work full-time because of a back injury she sustained while working in a dry cleaner’s, “Has been when you’re fighting the big medical bills, even though you have insurance – okay? – and it’s hard to find money for anything else. And now that he’s retired it’s going to be even harder.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Working from home surveillance software for your boss”

In the weeks since social distancing lockdowns abruptly scattered the American workforce, businesses across the country have scrambled to find ways to keep their employees in line, packing their social calendars and tracking their productivity to ensure they’re telling the truth about working from home.
Thousands of companies now use monitoring software to record employees’ Web browsing and active work hours, dispatching the kinds of tools built for corporate offices into workers’ phones, computers and homes.
Many employees are probably working longer and more sporadic hours than ever before: NordVPN Teams, which runs virtual private networks for businesses, said in March it had seen working time in the United States climb from eight to 11 hours a day since the stay-at-home orders began.
Several companies allow managers to regularly capture images of workers’ screens and list employees by who is actively working and their hours worked over the previous seven days.
One system, InterGuard, can be installed in a hidden way on workers’ computers and creates a minute-by-minute timeline of every app and website they view, categorizing each as “Productive” or “Unproductive” and ranking workers by their “Productivity score.” The system alerts managers if workers do or say something suspicious: In a demo of the software shown to The Post, the words “Job,” “Client” and “File” were all flagged, just in case employees were looking elsewhere for work.
Pragli executives argue that emails and Slack messages, the traditional lifeblood of office communication, are socially unfulfilling: efficient but soulless, and powerless to combat the distractions and loneliness of working from home.
Pragli’s system measures employees’ keyboard and mouse usage to assess whether they’re actively working – any more than 15 seconds can shift a worker from ‘active’ to ‘idle’ – and allows anyone to instantly start a video conversation by clicking on another person’s face, similar to swinging by their desk in a real-world office.
At the High Plains Journal, one woman working from home with four kids gave her Pragli avatar a shock of white hair.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This 3-Minute Habit Changed My Life”

Tracking my time has changed how I think about my time.
My time logs showed me that even in a full life there can still be space.
Knowing where the time goes allows you to redeploy time from the mundane to the meaningful, and from the forgettable to the memorable.
Everyone knows working moms don’t have time to read, right?
The result is that since I started tracking time, I have read War and Peace.
Since I mostly work out of a home office and don’t have a regular commute, I wasn’t building “Time in the car” into my mental model of life.
Time Tracking Helped Ease Working Parent Guilt I’d recommend time tracking to anyone prone to parental guilt.
With the time logs recording those sunsets, I simply cannot claim that I have no time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Decades After Its Release ‘9 to 5’ Is Still Radical Today”

The project was conceived of by Jane Fonda, who was inspired by the work of Karen Nussbaum, an old friend from the anti-war movement and founder of 9to5, an organization still in the business of advocating for working women.
In order to hide the fact that they’re holding their boss hostage, the women have to run the business as best they can, which, it turns out, is much better than Mr. Hart.
The annual cost of putting a baby in daycare typically costs more than a year’s tuition in state college, one of many factors driving women out of the workforce.
Recently there’s been a focus not just on sexism in U.S. workplaces, but also in Hollywood, as actresses speak out about equal pay and advocates point to the opportunity gap for women working behind the lens.
You did background research for 9 to 5 by spending time with office workers at Fox Studios’ insurance company.
We did a musical of 9 to 5 on Broadway in 2009, and it was really frustrating because a lot of the interviews that I did with male journalists, the first thing they said was, “Well, none of those issues are a problem in contemporary life, so how are women of today going to be able to relate to it?” I thought, yeah, you can’t sexually harass someone as obviously.
In terms of television, which is somewhat better for women, is still quite small.
I’m going in projects where there seems to be more than one woman in the room, and seeing female producers bringing in female writers and partnering with other women.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I clung to the middle class as I aged. The pandemic pulled me under.”

Several days of work at an international conference? The organizers decided not to take the risk.
Even if work dries up, that $2,800-a-month health insurance bill still comes due on the first of the month.
In the first two decades of this century, wages declined for working men over 55 with bachelor’s degrees.
In a downturn, older men do hold on to their jobs more regularly than younger ones, but when they lose work it takes them considerably longer to find their next position.
A study from the New School estimates that 8.5 million older workers over 55 would fall into poverty or near-poverty if they retired at 62 and began taking Social Security payments.
I had long tenures with “PBS NewsHour” and NPR. When I read warnings that workers could face sudden and catastrophic losses of income in their final years of employment, I was empathetic but concluded it could never happen to me.
I am years away from what I had thought of as the age when I could transition to part-time work.
It’s unclear at the moment just what federal and state government emergency programs will do for millions of self-employed and gig economy workers, many already hustling in the best of times, who’ve been watching their work dry up and disappear.

The orginal article.

Summary of “1918 flu pandemic: a letter from a relatable past.”

Lutiant Van Wert’s letter was the sixth item in an online exhibit at the National Archives about the 1918 pandemic I was absent-mindedly browsing, and what stood out to me then was how resolute and irreverent it was.
Lutiant’s letter to her pal Louise, who was still a student at the school, opens with a naughty bang: “So everybody has the ‘Flu’ at Haskell? I wish to goodness Miss Keck and Mrs. McK. would get it and die with it. Really, it would be such a good riddance, and not much lost either!” It was a startling joke to make about a deadly disease-uncomfortable, bold, queasily hilarious in a very teenage way.
The once-forgotten 1918 flu is a Twitter hashtag, we’re sheltering in place in a pandemic, and I now see the way Lutiant engages with mortality and living among disease in a different light.
Lutiant is jackknifing through the pandemic in a way that’s by turns funny and dissociative and largely consistent with responses people seem to be having now.
Rereading the letter amid COVID-19 made me want to look Lutiant up.
Lutiant graduated in June 1918, shortly after the first spate of the flu.
There’s more: Lutiant turned out to have had a far more personal connection to the flu than I’d realized.
Lutiant graduated from the Haskell Institute in June, four months before she wrote this letter.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Parents On Childcare And Challenges In Coronavirus Isolation”

Over the last week, I’ve talked to hundreds of parents about the specific challenges they’re facing now – some are unique, others feel near-universal.
“It’s not physically possible for two working parents to both work from home full time during regular workday working hours and care for a baby,” one mom named Melanie told me.
That’s essentially asking parents to do two full-time jobs at the same time – when, as she pointed out, childcare alone is more than enough to keep full-time caregivers and stay-at-home moms working hard all day.
One of the key things for parents and nonparents to realize is that most of the parents in your life are probably only able to get a fraction of their work done, and many are cramming it in during their kids’ naps and after they’ve gone to bed.
Some parents told me they’re most anxious about their child’s development and how they might be impacted in the long run by isolation and stress.
4) Not every parent has the option of working from home or full isolation – and childcare plans will have to change in the future.
Parents can decrease their overall anxiety by making plans for care now – and those without children can help lessen parents’ burden by offering themselves as potential caregivers when the time arrives.
Some parents whose childcare has fallen through will place their children with unvetted or unsafe caregivers because there have no better options.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What to Do on 15-, 30-, and 60-Minute Breaks to Boost Productivity”

If you’re not seeing the benefits of a break, perhaps you’re not using them correctly, says Carson Tate, author of Work Simply: Embracing the Power of Your Personal Productivity Style.
Used properly, taking a break is like hitting a reset button.
“We’re not as prone to self interrupt, such as taking Facebook or email breaks. We’re more passionate and connected to work.”
“It doesn’t matter, anything to physically get the blood moving. A five-minute break can be more effective than a 30-minute break if you incorporate movement.”
“You can do these activities in two minutes or 20. Little breaks like this keep your mind energized, and they can lead to those ‘aha!’ moments of creative insight.”
A study published in Harvard Business Review found that “Green micro breaks” improve attention span and performance.
Decluttering your workspace can be a good break, says Thomas.
Breaks are also impactful if there’s a connection with another human being, says Tate.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Food Safety and Coronavirus: A Comprehensive Guide”

To answer these questions, I referenced dozens of articles and scientific reports and enlisted the help of Ben Chapman, a food safety specialist from the North Carolina State University and cohost of Risky or Not and Food Safety Talk.
Some possible oral-fecal transmission routes would be from poor hygiene during food preparation, or the exposure of food crops to human fecal matter in the field during growth or harvest.
According to multiple health and safety organizations worldwide, including the CDC, the USDA, and the European Food safety Authority, there is currently no evidence that COVID-19 has spread through food or food packaging.
Previous coronavirus epidemics likewise showed no evidence of having been spread through food or packaging.
Does Chinese food pose a greater risk than other food? What about imported food and goods?
To reheat cutlets, casseroles, or bread in the oven, preheat the oven to 400°F, place the food on an oven-safe tray with shallow sides, and heat until the surface of the food is too hot to touch for more than an instant.
Reiterate the importance of hygiene and food safety protocols to all crew members.
If you order either my first book, The Food Lab, or my upcoming children’s book Every Night is Pizza Night through that link, not only will 100% of my sales commission be going directly towards producing food to be served free of charge to needy families and individuals affected by school and business shut-downs in San Mateo, an additional 10% of the sale cost will go to a nationwide network of independent bookstores.

The orginal article.