Summary of “By Day, a Sunny Smile for Disney Visitors. By Night, an Uneasy Sleep in a Car.”

Roughly 38 percent of the county’s 1.5 million workers earn less than that.
According to a survey of thousands of low-wage employees at the park, nearly three-quarters of workers who responded said they do not earn enough money to pay for their basic monthly expenses, and one in 10 said they had been homeless in the past two years.
The responses account for about 17 percent of the park’s overall work force.
These days, Ms. Bertola shares an apartment with her boyfriend, who has worked at Disneyland for years.
“We barely can make it work with the two of us working there almost full-time,” she said.
After working in salons for several years, Rebekah Pederson began working at Disneyland because she would be eligible to join the Makeup Artists and Hair Stylists Guild.
As a grill fry and a lead cook at Cafe Orleans, Grace Torres, 28, earns anywhere between $12.88 and $18 an hour, depending on her shift, working between 32 and 40 hours a week with a schedule that varies widely.
Her husband has also worked as a cook there for several years.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Lonely Life of a Professional YouTuber”

There are more professional YouTubers than ever before.
More people than ever are tuning in and desiring the life of a YouTuber.
“My flatmate is a YouTuber too, and she sells glitter.” Another YouTuber, Memeulous, lives on one of the floors below.
The tone became more and more ironic and self-deprecating, yet he somehow retained a bit of that old school YouTuber hyper-sincerity when encouraging people to like and subscribe.
Seven months before the now-famous Logan Paul controversy in Japan, a YouTuber was shot in the chest by his wife and co-star while trying to make a prank video.
At the same time, these controversies fuel the YouTuber ecosystem.
In some ways, you can see the YouTuber as the ultimate distillation of modern neoliberal culture: an entire community of self-promoting individualistic entrepreneurs, desperately battling each other for economic success, while their work simultaneously benefits advertisers and drives the success of a corporate monolith: YouTube.
In an era of “Bullshit jobs”, when the radical idea of a post-work society is becoming more realistic by the day, the unconventional career of the professional YouTuber becomes inherently interesting.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Being a Two-Career Couple Requires a Long-Term Plan”

Kate and her husband, Matthew, were a classic dual career couple.
One of their innovations was to plan a lifetime family career – together.
Dual income couples are now the norm: over two thirds of couples in Canada and the UK, and 60% of couples in the U.S. They are beginning to realize they may each be the other’s most significant career asset.
As careers morph into 50-year marathons rather than 30-year sprints, we may also want to think of couple careers over much longer timeframes.
One career is clearly dominant, and will define where the couple lives, and where they move to.
Parallelograms – two parallel, high-powered careers, sometimes called “Power couples.” Increasing in number, these careers are often mutually reinforcing, with professional networks and knowledge that feed each other, think House of Cards.
Complements – diversity in couple careers can be as beneficial as diversity in any team.
You may move from one model to another over the course of ever-longer careers, and that may even be part of the plan.

The orginal article.

Summary of “9 Months Is A Long Time To Wait For Science News”

9 Months Is A Long Time To Wait For Science News : Shots – Health News Some scientists want to change the old-fashioned way scientific advancements are evaluated and communicated.
The fate of that paper rests on just two or three scientists who have been asked to review it and decide whether it’s worthy of being published.
Part of the problem the community confronts is that peer review isn’t simply about providing feedback to scientists so they can improve the papers they submitted.
Bloom says peer review does a reasonable job of picking studies of interest to journals such as hers, but it does a poor job of improving the quality of the paper.
“Peer review is not going to help,” he told the scientists.
If a top journal reviews a paper and decides not to publish it, the scientist needs to start the process of getting to print all over again – which is a waste of resources.
Because scientists are rewarded for getting papers past peer review in the top journals, attention-grabbing findings are valued over careful work.
Among the challenges he faces is that scientists will struggle to find the time to do careful reviews of papers published online.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Beat Procrastination”

Procrastination has been around since the start of modern civilization.
Historical figures like Herodotus, Leonardo Da Vinci, Pablo Picasso, Benjamin Franklin, Eleanor Roosevelt, and hundreds of others have talked about how procrastination is the enemy of results.
The funny thing about procrastination is that we all know that it’s harmful.
Researchers even compare procrastination to alcohol and drug abuse.
Procrastination is a habit that just sneaks into your system.
“The present evidence suggests that procrastinators enjoy themselves rather than working at assigned tasks, until the rising pressure of imminent deadlines forces them to get to work. In this view, procrastination may derive from a lack of self-regulation and hence a dependency on externally imposed forces to motivate work.”
The truth is: Procrastination has nothing to do with what you’re trying to do – small or big, it can wait until later.
Are you an auditory learner? Listen to my latest podcast episode, in which I share more tips about overcoming procrastination.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Tech Companies Can Help Upskill the U.S. Workforce”

In 2015, there were 7 million jobs that required some level of coding skills, and programming jobs are growing 12% faster than market average.
Three key initiatives can help: Supplementing K-12 with vocational training programs, increasing access to job retraining for adults, and empowering lower-skilled workers to continuously “Upskill” on the job.
Vocational Technical training programs for high school students are key to helping them specialize in in-demand technology-related fields, and be ready for the job market.
Increasing access to job retraining programs for adults.
We are currently experiencing intra-generational job disruption, where the job you trained for at age 20 may not exist at age 40.
As a start, we should support job-retraining programs to help transition low-income, lower-skilled workers into well-paying technology jobs.
We need similar programs to serve workers without a post-secondary degree, who are seeking middle-skill jobs.
Empowering lower-skilled workers to continuously upskill on the job.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The two mental shifts highly successful people make”

There are two primary mental shifts that occur in the lives of all highly successful people.
Both of these shifts require a great deal of mental stretching from conventional and societal ways of thinking.
Highly successful people are continually learning and striving to better understand the world around them.
Finally, people who have experienced this first mental shift really care about momentum.
Most people get stuck at the first shift If you take complete responsibility for your life and choices, you will develop a love for learning.
In the book, Ego is the Enemy, Ryan Holiday explains that many successful people “Stop being a student.”
The first several habits are to help you experience the first mental shift, or what Covey calls the “Private Victory.”
Once you master these habits, you will go from dependence on others to a high state of independence - the first mental shift.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The GANfather: The man who’s given machines the gift of imagination”

The goal of GANs is to give machines something akin to an imagination.
When future historians of technology look back, they’re likely to see GANs as a big step toward creating machines with a human-like consciousness.
Yann LeCun, Facebook’s chief AI scientist, has called GANs “The coolest idea in deep learning in the last 20 years.” Another AI luminary, Andrew Ng, the former chief scientist of China’s Baidu, says GANs represent “a significant and fundamental advance” that’s inspired a growing global community of researchers.
In one widely publicized example last year, researchers at Nvidia, a chip company heavily invested in AI, trained a GAN to generate pictures of imaginary celebrities by studying real ones.
Once it’s been trained on a lot of dog photos, a GAN can generate a convincing fake image of a dog that has, say, a different pattern of spots; but it can’t conceive of an entirely new animal.
Researchers at Yale University and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have developed a GAN that, after training on existing simulation data, learns to generate pretty accurate predictions of how a particular particle will behave, and does it much faster.
Hany Farid, who studies digital forensics at Dartmouth College, is working on better ways to spot fake videos, such as detecting slight changes in the color of faces caused by inhaling and exhaling that GANs find hard to mimic precisely.
Researchers are already highlighting the risk of “Black box” attacks, in which GANs are used to figure out the machine-learning models with which plenty of security programs spot malware.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Retirement-Savings Crisis Is Making Never-Ending Work”

“I’m a working woman again,” she told me, in the common room of the senior apartment complex where she now lives, here in California’s Inland Empire.
Gordon has worked dozens of odd jobs throughout her life-as a house cleaner, a home health aide, a telemarketer, a librarian, a fundraiser-but at many times in her life, she didn’t have a steady job that paid into Social Security.
Many people reaching retirement age don’t have the pensions that lots of workers in previous generations did, and often have not put enough money into their 401(k)s to live off of; the median savings in a 401(k) plan for people between the ages of 55 and 64 is currently just $15,000, according to the National Institute on Retirement Security, a nonprofit.
“In the early decades of our work, we were serving communities that had been poor when they were younger,” Prindiville told me.
If today’s seniors are struggling with retirement savings, what will become of the people of working age today, many of whom hold unsteady jobs and have patchwork incomes that leave little room for retirement savings? The current wave of senior poverty could just be the beginning.
In 1979, 28 percent of private-sector workers had participated in defined-benefit retirement plans-by 2014, just 2 percent did, according to the Employee Benefit Research Institute, a nonprofit.
At least Belleau and others are physically able to work.
She’s still working at 76, but she feels a little more secure now that she has more help.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Behind the minimum wage fight, a sweeping failure to enforce the law”

As Democrats make raising the minimum wage a centerpiece of their 2018 campaigns, and Republicans call for states to handle the issue, both are missing an important problem: Wage laws are poorly enforced, with workers often unable to recover back pay even after the government rules in their favor.
This failure to enforce both the minimum hourly wage – $7.25 under federal law – and rules requiring higher pay for overtime distorts the economy, giving advantages to employers who break the law.
Interviews with scores of state officials, legal-services advocates and labor specialists indicate that the failure to enforce minimum wages touches every corner of the country, but is especially acute in the six states that have no investigators probing wage violations at all.
Asked to comment on POLITICO’s findings, Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown, who helps lead a group of 22 Senate Democrats who support a plan to gradually increase the federal minimum to $15 per hour, and who has pushed his own bill to provide up to $50 million in grants to employers, nonprofits, unions and others who can assist in the enforcement of wage and hour laws, expressed concern but quickly pivoted to the larger issue of raising the minimum wage.
Workers who are shortchanged on minimum wage or overtime pay have three options: They can hire a private attorney; they can file a complaint with the state labor agency, if it enforces wage claims; or they can file a complaint with the federal Labor Department’s Wage and Hour division.
“State labor agencies in the South that enforce wage laws are few and far between,” observes Meredith Stewart, a senior staff attorney at the Southern Poverty Law Center.
State figures included many forms of wage theft and enforcement actions depending on what the state reported, including minimum wage, overtime and unpaid wages and benefits.
Said Rep. Bobby Scott, ranking member of the House Education and the Workforce Committee: “If there is not strong enforcement of wage theft, then any efforts to raise the minimum wage, strengthen overtime, or protect workers’ tips are ineffectual.”

The orginal article.