Summary of “Why quitting your job without a backup plan can help your career”

“Sometimes you need time to detox and heal from abusive situations so that you don’t jump into something just as bad to get away from your current job,” says Rhonda Ansted, career coach and Founder of Be the Change Career Consulting.
Leaving your job without any savings in the bank is likely to lead to you feeling forced to take any job out of financial necessity.
If you can’t job search while working your current job.
Looking for a new job while employed means you can never truly give your all to your search, and you may not have the time to explore all of the opportunities available, never mind booking time off to go to interviews.
“It didn’t feel fair to the company I was working for, and it would have limited the time I was able to spend charting my next move,” says First, who quit her job without having another one lined up, freeing up her time to do a thorough job search.
Quitting your job without a backup plan has the same effect on your nervous system as walking into the desert without any water.
Assess the toll your unhappiness in your current job is having on your health.
Quitting your job with no plan in place allows you to be open to new opportunities that you may never have considered if you simply took the next opportunity that fell in your lap.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I’m Quantitative Futurist Amy Webb, and This Is How I Work”

Location: NYCCurrent Gig: Quantitative futurist, professor of Strategic Foresight at NYU Stern School of Business, founder of the Future Today InstituteOne word that best describes how you work: MethodicallyCurrent mobile device: Samsung S9Current computer: Mac Pro.First of all, tell us a little about your background and how you got to where you are today.
In sixth grade, I joined our middle school Future Problem Solvers of America team, and without realizing it I began my work as a futurist when I was just 11 years old.
I wanted to model and map plausible scenarios for what that future might look like, and that’s when a colleague pointed me to the work of early futurists like Robert Jungk and Alvin Toffler, and of the quantitative modeling developed by Olaf Helmer and Nicholas Rescher.
I’ve been working full-time as a quantitative futurist ever since.
Every day at work is different-sometimes I’m at the office, but often I’m on the road-so I’ll offer you two recent workdays.
The 20-minute unit system is definitely an adjustment for people who work with me.
Our team is distributed-we work out of spaces in many different cities and don’t have a central physical hub.
The How I Work series asks heroes, experts, and flat-out productive people to share their shortcuts, workspaces, routines, and more.

The orginal article.

Summary of “10 of the best words in the world”

One of the many great things about languages worldwide is the sizeable number of words for which there is no real English translation.
There are words that come close, that encapsulate something of the spirit of this word – and the word itself is spirited.
Ask a Finn to define the national character, and it’s the word most still reach for.
Ta’arof is a Persian word that has no English equivalent, referring to the art of etiquette ubiquitous in everyday Iranian life.
Tiáo is one of at least 140 classifiers and measure words in the Chinese language.
It’s a measure word for long-narrow-shape things.
These measure words embrace the ways in which shape imprints itself upon us, while playfully noticing the relationships between all things.
The measure word kē is used for small, roundish things, or objects that appear small: pearls, teeth, bullets and seeds, as well as distant stars and satellites.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 Things Only Serious Writers Do”

There are five fundamental things that set serious writers apart from the rest.
She reminded me that serious writers don’t wait for the muse to visit them before they start, and this is echoed by many famous writers I’ve spoken with over the years.
The power of simply starting is an incredible psychological tool for serious writers.
All serious writers know that small, incremental steps are the only path to achieving great work, and that you can’t edit a blank page.
All serious writers know that every inspired or brilliant page is typically preceded by a dozen shitty ones.
The award-winning creator, producer, and host of the megahit Lore podcast, TV show, and book series, Aaron Mahnke, came on the podcast to discuss his writing regimen and share some advice for serious writers.
All serious writers meet their deadlines with ease, and they don’t sweat it because they have the tools at hand to keep the cursor moving until the job is done.
Only serious writers have the ability to focus on what’s important and tune out what’s not.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Solutions to Problems Suddenly Pop into our Minds”

While not actually working on the problem at all, a possible solution would pop into his mind.
Why do solutions to problems suddenly pop into our minds?
The brain’s networks of neurons are highly interconnected, so there seems little scope for assigning different problems to different brain networks.
If the brain solves problems through the cooperation computation of vast networks of individually sluggish neurons, then any specific network of neurons can work on just one solution to one problem at a time.
Whether mathematical, musical, or of any other kind, is the very antithesis of a routine, specialized problem with a dedicated brain network: On the contrary, thinking about such problems will need to engage most of the brain.
What is special about such problems is that you can’t solve them through a routine set of steps-you have to look at the problem in the “Right way” before you can make progress.
Poincaré’s description of his particular method of solving mathematical problems suggests why he was particularly susceptible to brilliant flashes of insight.
Crucially, for Poincaré, mathematical problems were transformed into perceptual problems: and with the right perceptual intuition, the creating a proof would be relatively routine, if slow.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What I Learned as a U.S. Postal Service Mail Carrier”

What I learned about America, and myself, working as a mail carrier.
I was training with a veteran letter carrier on a walk-out route, the type where the carrier pushes a blue buggy full of mail and small packages.
The rude welcome to the Postal Service quickly taught me mail delivery is no leisurely stroll through the neighborhood, dismantling the idyllic image of a smiling Mr. McFeeley handing out birthday cards in “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.” My first week on the job, I lost 5 pounds.
I saw how critical the Postal Service is for local businesses, like the one that ships dozens of Priority Mail boxes of custom-made zippers for wedding gowns across the country every day.
Then it was off to city carrier academy, where veteran carriers taught my fellow classmates and me the tricks of organizing and carrying mail and how to drive the postal vehicles.
The Postal Service wasn’t really built for the Amazon era: Our vehicles don’t have enough space to house them, and few have shelves, leaving carriers to play an Amazon box-sized game of Jenga every day.
One told me about a mail carrier who heard a smoke alarm going off in an empty house and alerted a neighbor.
Stephen MeyersStephen Meyers worked as a mail carrier for the United States Postal Service in 2017 and 2018.

The orginal article.

Summary of “You’ve Got the Dreams but are You Doing the Work?”

Your dreams are as realistic as the work you’re willing to put in.
They’re asking us, “How bad do you want it? How much work will you still put in?”.
I have to give you fair warning: there is actually one thing that can stop you from doing your daily work.
If you don’t have a plan, if you don’t have realistic and actionable goals to pursue, you will not follow through with your dreams.
So how much work are you putting in? How often are you planning?
Because if you pick just one task, that’s going to be the most important task you could pick, right? Limiting your goals forces you to choose smarter, more significant goals.
If you commit to your one daily goal this week, and if you plan out that goal and check it off every day, and use that one daily goal as the foundation for a lifelong planning practice that you consistently perfect, you will get consistent, positive results.
So how much work are you putting in? How much are you planning?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Inside Google’s Shadow Workforce”

Google has a name for them: TVCs, or “Temps, vendors and contractors.” They are employed by several outside agencies, including Adecco Group AG, Cognizant Technology Solutions Corp. and Randstad NV. Google declined to say how many agencies the company uses.
Yana Calou, an organizer with advocacy group Coworker.org who speaks with Google employees and contractors, said that both groups are concerned about the workers who aren’t full Google employees.
Google’s initial flood of contractors came with its first “Moonshot.” Dozens of temporary workers were hired, more than a decade ago, to photocopy dog-eared pages for the company’s free digital library, Google Books.
One 2016 TVC employment contract from Zenith Talent Corp., a recruiting agency, states that TVCs “Will not be entitled to any compensation, options, stock, insurance or other rights or benefits accorded to employees of Google.” The terms hold even if a court later determines the worker was legally a Google employee.
In Google’s home county of Santa Clara, a family of four with an income of as much as $94,450 a year is considered by the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development to be “Low income”; total annual compensation for a full-time Google janitor-including benefits as well as wages- is a bit over half that amount.
Contractors must agree to assist Google in securing the company’s intellectual property, and if Google is unable to get the worker’s signature, the search giant becomes the worker’s de facto attorney.
Google did not provide comment on that episode, but a spokeswoman said that TVCs have access to Google’s complaint channel, and that it reviews those it receives and investigates when appropriate.
According to two former Google managers, Adecco takes roughly 20 percent of the pay of Google’s contracted employees.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Library Rules: How to make an open office plan work”

Ok, so given all that, if you do go open, how do you make open work?
One, they’re generally open spaces with a number of desks and surfaces scattered throughout - similar to an open floor plan office.
They’re called libraries! And the more you treat your office as a library of work - rather than a chaotic kitchen of work - the better an open floor plan is going to work.
Making an open floor plan work is a cultural decision.
So even if you’re fortunate enough to work remotely, or in an office with private rooms for everyone, if you’re forced to follow multiple real-time conversations all day long, you’re effectively working in open plan office too.
AcousticsWhat’s worse than an open floor plan? An open floor plan loaded with hard surfaces! And given that many open plans are housed in old warehouse/loft-like spaces, you’re materially at a disadvantage.
Open’s a choiceYes, an open floor plan is a choice, but it requires a cultural commitment to respect and quiet.
It’s all optional!We did the best job we could designing an open office that allows everyone to work in focused peace and quiet every day.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Man Who Captures Criminals for the D.E.A. by Playing Them”

Robert Russillo, a former D.E.A. agent who worked with Enotiades in the mid-nineties, credited Enotiades’s success to his “Worldly ways” and a knack for “Putting people at ease.” When Enotiades played Yianni, he took to calling the Iranian-American his “Adopted son.”
Fluent in English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, and Greek, Enotiades specializes in playing the role of cartel boss, middleman, or money manager, making phone calls and holding face-to-face meetings with the D.E.A.’s targets.
One day, Enotiades invited one of the Panamanians to his hotel room, where the target noticed his passport on a table and discovered that Enotiades wasn’t Greek, as he’d claimed.
One night at his club, Tsakalakis, a skinny, nervous man in his early thirties, invited Enotiades to his office, where he cut and snorted heroin and offered some to Enotiades, who politely declined.
In early 1993, Enotiades travelled with the men to Boston, where, according to Enotiades, the D.E.A. had booked four suites at the Swissôtel in the financial district.
In the summer of 1994, Enotiades flew to Salta, in northern Argentina, to meet with two traffickers, Luis and Miguel, who had agreed to supply ten thousand kilos of cocaine to the American buyers whom Enotiades claimed to represent.
The man, who preferred that I not use his name, told me, “My girlfriend of ten years had no idea what I was doing until that court case came out.” The relationship ended and the man closed down his business and moved elsewhere in Europe, where he has continued to work with the D.E.A. In 1995, Enotiades started a telecommunications business and a construction company in New York with friends.
On the evening of September 20, 2004, Boyaco, a short man who carried himself with an exaggerated air of authority, came to see Enotiades at the Tamanaco InterContinental, a luxury hotel in Caracas, Venezuela, with three men, one of whom he introduced as Sandro, a pilot.

The orginal article.