Summary of “5 Research-Based Strategies for Overcoming Procrastination”

In one time log I kept, I found that over the course of one week, I spent six hours putting off tasks – and that’s just the procrastination that was apparent from my time log.
The more averse you find a task, the more likely you are to procrastinate.
When a task sets off procrastination triggers, we resist doing it.
What about 30 minutes? Shorten the amount of time until you find a period with which you’re no longer resistant to the task – and then do it.
That’s because the tasks that induce procrastination are rarely as bad as we think.
Getting started on something forces a subconscious reappraisal of that work, where we might find that the actual task sets off fewer triggers than we originally anticipated.
There are proven ways to combat procrastination so that it doesn’t get in the way of accomplishing your most important tasks.
The next time you resist a task, consider whether it sets off any of the procrastination triggers, work within your resistance level, force yourself to get started on it, list the costs of putting the task off, or disconnect from the internet.

The orginal article.

Summary of “J.J. Barea’s message on behalf of Puerto Rico: Every little bit helps”

The Puerto Rico where I grew up was an island of beauty.
In Puerto Rico, our infrastructure is not like in the U.S. A little rainstorm and you lose electricity for 24 hours.
We have an amazing community of Puerto Ricans and Latinos in Dallas and they were already gathering donations.
With me were my wife and 10 of my best friends from Dallas, almost all Puerto Ricans.
While in Puerto Rico, I saw signs of U.S. assistance.
This is the message the people in Puerto Rico wanted me to take back to the States.
One of my friends said every day is like a bad movie, over and over again.
So here’s what I’d like to say to anyone reading this story: Every little bit helps.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Don’t Get Too Comfortable at That Desk”

The new designs often include “Isolation rooms,” soundproof phone booths, and even lounges where technology is forbidden.
The corporations setting the new standard are not young Silicon Valley companies known for free food, slides and foosball tables at work – or for carefree spending, as at Apple, whose new corporate mothership cost a reported $5 billion.
Salesforce’s new skyscraper campus in San Francisco, for example, has areas on every floor for meditation, partly inspired by the teachings of Thich Nhat Hanh, a Buddhist monk.
“These workplace ideas are beginning to be adopted across all industries,” said Arlyn Vogelmann, a principal at Gensler, an architecture and design firm whose clients include Facebook and G.E.The new designs are not about looks.
Space drives behavior, experts say, and the goal of the new designs is to hasten the pace of sharing ideas, making decisions and creating new products.
The new model eschews the common dogmas of work life: Everybody gets an office, or everyone gets a cubicle, or everybody gets a seat on a workbench.
A diversity of spaces, experts say, is more productive, and the new concept is called “Activity-based workplace design,” tailoring spaces for the kind of work done.
The company faces a new wave of technology, as the market has shifted to software delivered and constantly updated as a service over the internet cloud, as opposed to being loaded onto individual computers, with the code often stored on compact discs and sold as a product every few years.

The orginal article.

Summary of “We Talked to the 18-Year-Old Gen Z Advisor for the Minnesota Vikings”

Stillman is using a gap year between high school and college to take on a role as “Gen Z Advisor” with the Minnesota Vikings.
In the Vikings’ words, Stillman is consulting “On a variety of club business initiatives, including team marketing and fan activation efforts, Vikings Entertainment Network and digital media content and strategy, U.S. Bank Stadium fan experience… and workplace culture.” Essentially, Stillman is a generational communicator, bridging the gap of what works with people his age to old farts, both as a fan base and as employees.
As a 31-year-old myself, I was curious about what, exactly differentiates Gen Z from their older counterparts, the millennials.
“I was raised post-9/11 in the midst of the 2009 recession, and watched my parents and across the board, Gen Z’s parents stripped of what they earned. We were told that there were winners and losers. It’s not always a very pretty work world out there, and if you don’t work your ass off, there’s a good chance you’ll be a loser. Gen Z, compared to Millennials, is a very very competitive generation at a younger age.”
At first blush, it seems like this Gen Z crowd is a good fit with the NFL. Stillman insists that his generation is already locked in to football-Madden and fantasy sports helped solidify that.
“The problem is that the platforms that we’re looking for are different and we’ve got to be on all of those platforms. It used to be TV on a Sunday was where we got your football. We now have hundreds of options of where to get our team. So whether it be Instagram, Snapchat, YouTube, or cable TV, there are a lot of places where Gen Z lives, and having a presence on all those platforms is greatly important to people in any industry.”
Stillman will spend his next year bouncing back and forth between the Vikings headquarters in Eden Prarie, Minnesota and New York to help the Vikings strategize for this new demographic.
All of this alongside managing his own Gen Z consulting company, GenZGuru-which he started with his Gen X father to help communicate Gen Z’s place in the market to large companies.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Regain Focus at Work by Slaying the Messaging Monster”

Technology is taking over our lives, especially in the workplace.
What can we do to put technology in its place to finally get focused work done?
Below are resources, tools, and articles for regaining focus in your digital life.
These are tools I use myself but is not meant to be an exhaustive list.
Full disclosure – I am an investor in Pana.com, one of the companies mentioned in the presentation.
If you have tools and tips you’d like to suggest, please share them in the comments section below.
Here’s my presentation on how to find focus at work by Slaying the Messaging Monster.
These are some of the tools I use and recommend, but please tell me your suggestions in the comments below!

The orginal article.

Summary of “My 150 Writing Mentors and Me”

The writing you end up with is an approximation, if you’re lucky, of whatever it was you really wanted to say.
“And that’s okay.” The vast majority of writers I speak to seem to understand this: Writing usually means writing badly.
Re Dubus III begins every writing session by reading poetry, listening to music, and typing out the previous day’s handwritten work.
I don’t go up against my writing and come out bloody-knuckled.
Writing a first draft, you can become paralyzed by these thoughts.
In the meantime, I’ve built my life around the daily ritual of my morning writing.
On days the writing itself seems flawed, unworthy-most days-I sometimes start to wonder if the sacrifices have been worth it.
That’s just how writing a novel, like any worthwhile task, is always going to feel: like a receding horizon, with brief glimpses of the shore.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This Recruiter Shares The Questions The Smartest Job Candidates Asked”

To help get you started, here are some of the super-smart questions I’ve been asked during actual interviews by real-life candidates-and the reasons they got my attention.
I’ve been asked this a few times-especially more recently-and it’s a great question.
Equally, stay alert and if you sense it’s time to move the conversation on, gently change the subject to something else, or ask a new question that’s easier to answer.
As a candidate, it’s the perfect question to catch the recruiter a little off-guard and get an honest answer.
A seriously gutsy question! So gutsy that I was impressed by the confidence of the candidate who asked it.
A question like this gives you the chance to address any concerns the recruiter may have about your fit for the role head-on, in person.
This is another question that shows a recruiter they’re talking to a candidate who cares about team dynamics and understands that how a team works together can make or break the success of its projects.
The hiring manager knows you want to figure out if the role is right for you so they’ll be expecting questions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “When Working From Home Doesn’t Work”

To ease a logjam at the office mainframe, it installed boxy, green-screened terminals in the homes of five employees, allowing them to work from home.
The corporation eventually realized that it could save millions by selling its signature buildings and institutionalizing distance work; the number of remote workers ballooned.
“If what they’re looking to do is reduce productivity, lose talent, and increase cost, maybe they’re on to something,” says Kate Lister, the president of Global Workplace Analytics, which measures working from home.
There’s reason to regard the move as a signal, however faint, that telecommuting has reached its high-water mark-and that more is lost in working apart than was first apparent.
Letting Chinese call-center employees work from home boosted their productivity by 13 percent, a Stanford study reported.
If it’s personal productivity-how many sales you close or customer complaints you handle-then the research, on balance, suggests that it’s probably better to let people work where and when they want.
In one study of software developers, Waber, working alongside researchers from IBM, found that workers in the same office traded an average of 38 communications about each potential trouble spot they confronted, versus roughly eight communications between workers in different locations.
Talking with Purdie, I began to wonder whether the company was calling its employees back to an old way of working or to a new one-one that didn’t exist in 1979, when business moved at a more stately pace.

The orginal article.

Summary of “8-hour workday may be 5 hours too long, research suggests”

The average worker spends most of the eight-hour workday doing many other things beside work, including eating, socializing, or reading the news.
Over the course of an eight-hour workday, the average employee works for about three hours – two hours and 53 minutes, to be more precise.
A study of UK office workers suggests the three-hour workday might be more sensible.
People can’t sustain hard work for more than a few hours, psychologists have found.
Research suggests the smarter change may actually be to work five, six-hour days.
In Sweden, a government study that ran between January 2015 and January 2017 selected roughly 80 retirement-home workers in Gothenburg to work that exact schedule.
At the end of the study, people said they were happier, less stressed, and enjoyed work more.
“Employers may actually be getting much more out of their employees,” he said, “If they only work 50 or 75 percent of the current work hours.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “8-hour workday may be 5 hours too long, research suggests”

The average worker spends most of the eight-hour workday doing many other things beside work, including eating, socializing, or reading the news.
Over the course of an eight-hour workday, the average employee works for about three hours – two hours and 53 minutes, to be more precise.
A study of UK office workers suggests the three-hour workday might be more sensible.
People can’t sustain hard work for more than a few hours, psychologists have found.
Research suggests the smarter change may actually be to work five, six-hour days.
In Sweden, a government study that ran between January 2015 and January 2017 selected roughly 80 retirement-home workers in Gothenburg to work that exact schedule.
At the end of the study, people said they were happier, less stressed, and enjoyed work more.
“Employers may actually be getting much more out of their employees,” he said, “If they only work 50 or 75 percent of the current work hours.”

The orginal article.