Summary of “The #1 Office Perk? Natural Light”

In a research poll of 1,614 North American employees, we found that access to natural light and views of the outdoors are the number one attribute of the workplace environment, outranking stalwarts like onsite cafeterias, fitness centers, and premium perks including on-site childcare.
Over a third of employees feel that they don’t get enough natural light in their workspace.
47% of employees admit they feel tired or very tired from the absence of natural light or a window at their office, and 43% report feeling gloomy because of the lack of light.
Amazon’s Spheres relies on the premise that natural light, plant life, and healthy activities such as walking reduce employee stress and improve job satisfaction more so than a standard office building.
Some European Union countries mandate employee proximity to windows as part of their national building code! This is because they realize that an absence of natural light hurts overall employee experience, up and down the organization.
The Future Workplace Employee Experience Study found 78% of employees say access to natural light and views improves their wellbeing and 70% report improved work performance.
Having access to natural light can have a bottom-line impact on your employees’ work performance, wellbeing and engagement.
As companies increasingly look to empower their employees to work better and be healthier, it is clear that placing them in office spaces with the optimal amount of natural light should be one of their first considerations.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Rocket woman: How to cook curry and get a spacecraft into Mars orbit”

Can you guide a spacecraft into orbit around Mars and cook for eight people morning and night? Yes, if you get up at 5am, and your name is BP Dakshayani.
Four years ago, the picture of a group of women in saris celebrating as an Indian spacecraft successfully entered Mars orbit shone a light on the role played by women in the country’s space programme – among them BP Dakshayani.
A year after she began working at Isro, her parents arranged her marriage to orthopaedic surgeon Dr Manjunath Basavalingappa – which meant that she suddenly had a household to run.
Her voice is full of enthusiasm as she talks about how she juggled home and work life, how much she enjoyed her work and how solving problems gave her happiness.
As she brings out tea and delicious snacks, the couple talk about the decades they’ve spent together, about how they have supported each other in tough times and how their relationship and respect for each other has grown over the years.
“Sometimes I would go to work on Saturdays and he thought maybe that was because I was not doing my work properly,” she says.
Today, Dr Basavalingappa says he is incredibly proud of his wife and what she has achieved by her hard work – the Mars mission, for example, and the “Space recovery project” where Dakshayani calculated how to ensure that a space capsule returning to Earth would not burn up on re-entry to the Earth’s atmosphere, and could be safely recovered at sea.
Dr Basavalingappa explains that as a doctor, his working day often stretches up to 18 hours, while his wife mostly worked office hours.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Sitzfleisch: The German concept to get more work done”

Literally translated, sitzfleisch means ‘sitting meat’ or ‘sitting flesh’ – in other words, a term for one’s behind or bottom.
To have sitzfleisch means the ability to sit still for the long periods of time required to be truly productive; it means the stamina to work through a difficult situation and see a project through to the end.
When someone says you have sitzfleisch, it’s usually a professional compliment: it means they believe you’re capable of focusing long enough to complete a tough project or finish whatever work needs to be done.
Sitzfleisch is a great example of how these compound words can pack in additional meaning just through juxtaposition.
A recent article about the most recent Star Wars film notes that, at 152 minutes long, the movie “Certainly strains the sitzfleisch of the average movie-goer.”
How do you go about cultivating a bit of sitzfleisch? Robert Hogan, a fellow with the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology in the US, says the first step is recognising you need to work on it in the first place – and having the desire to improve.
Although sitzfleisch is still fairly universally considered as a positive quality – and the lack of it a sign someone is professionally lacking – the word may take on different connotations in a work world that’s more flexible and no longer 9-to-5.
Hogan, underlines however that it really doesn’t matter whether you’re sitting at an office desk or working less regular hours remotely: you can still have sitzfleisch wherever you work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Realistic Magic of Hal Ashby, the Greatest Director of the 1970s”

More so because Ashby had a way of making his movies about weighty ideals and real-seeming people, neither of which have aged much in the past 40 or so years.
Of Ashby, Jack Nicholson once said that when friends referred to him, it’s “Like we’re writing a recommendation for a college scholarship.” When Ashby won the Oscar for Best Editing, he delivered one of the shortest and most precise speeches in the ceremony’s history: “To repeat the words of a very dear friend of mine last year when he picked up his Oscar, I only hope that we can use all of our talents and creativity toward peace and love. Thank you.” He walked off the stage without another word.
I realized through more research that the mythology about Hal Ashby being this burnout hippie wastoid that couldn’t do anything was just not accurate.
The director Norman Jewison adopted Hal Ashby as a kind of mentee and became a father figure to the hardworking but nomadic Southwestern refugee.
The Ashby we talk about now was a late-blooming creative talent who spent the first 34 years of his life slowly nosing his way into the upper echelon of the movies.
No matter the genre-lace-curtain thriller or Cold War satire, social-issues drama or sleek caper-Jewison and Ashby pushed the style and structure of movies, toying with jump cuts, pans, close-ups, insert shots, and particularly multiframe formats that would subtly reinvent the visual language of Hollywood movies.
Shampoo is the second Ashby film made from a Robert Towne script, after The Last Detail, and you can feel the director locking into the deep, idiosyncratic material.
Ashby was the original director chosen for Tootsie, getting so far as to shoot screen tests with Dustin Hoffman in character and costume.

The orginal article.

Summary of “California: San Francisco, rich and poor, turns to simple street solutions that underscore the city’s complexities”

At the same time, the city has banned the use of another plastic item: the drinking straw.
The streets of San Francisco – hilly, curvy, cinematic and, in recent years, a bleak showcase for the mentally ill and economically displaced – have long reflected this eccentric city’s governing priorities and many civic contradictions.
Breed is the first African American woman to run San Francisco, emerging from a close election in June that was largely about how the city is changing and what should be done to preserve its character.
“You begin to wonder about all the tax dollars and whether they are being spent in the right way,” said Jeffrey Ouyang, a 10-year city resident who works for the tech start-up Zumper, a real estate search site.
Among Breed’s first decisions was to deploy a five-person Public Works crew to do nothing but clean the streets of human feces – it was dubbed the “Poop patrol” – as the city has received more than 14,000 reports about human waste this year alone.
Under a measure before the city government, new tech companies would not be allowed to open on-site cafeterias, long a lure to would-be employees, hoping to better spread the wealth from within the city’s insular tech offices to the local restaurants and lunch trucks just outside.
It is not just Breed and city employees working on those streets.
“This is all kind of new to me – homelessness, the drug use, people living in BART [transit] stations,” said Piña, who came to the city from the San Joaquin Valley city of Tracy.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Don’t Underestimate the Power of Women Supporting Each Other at Work”

Don’t underestimate the power of women connecting and supporting each other at work.
Senior-level women who champion younger women even today are more likely to get negative performance reviews, according to a 2016 study in The Academy of Management Journal.
According to a 2016 McKinsey report, Women in the Workplace, white men make up 36% of entry-level corporate jobs, and white women make up 31%. But at the very first rung above that, those numbers change to 47% for white men and 26% for white women – a 16% drop.
For women of color, the drop from 17% to 11% is a plunge of 35%. People tend to think that whatever conditions exist now are “Normal.” Maybe this explains men’s blind spots: at companies where only one in ten senior leaders are women, says McKinsey, nearly 50% of men felt women were “Well represented” in leadership.
I hope it lowered the attrition rate of women working at my company – rates that are, across all corporate jobs, stubbornly higher for women than men, especially women of color.
What are women in the workplace to do, when research shows that we’re penalized for trying to lift each other up? The antidote to being penalized for sponsoring women may just be to do it more – and to do it vocally, loudly, and proudly – until we’re able to change perceptions.
There are massive benefits for the individual and the organization when women support each other.
I’m thrilled by the rise of women’s organizations like Sallie Krawchek’s Ellevate Network, a professional network of women supporting each other across companies to change the culture of business at large.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Shaming of Geoffrey Owens and the Inability to See Actors as Laborers, Too”

I remembered Geoffrey Owens not from “The Cosby Show,” on which he played Elvin Tibideaux for five seasons, but from my sophomore year at Yale, where he was teaching undergraduate acting.
In other words, Owens is what we think of as a successful working actor: known but not a “Celebrity,” with an IMDb page that rarely skips a year.
Apparently, that’s why a woman shopping at Trader Joe’s last week, in Clifton, New Jersey, was so jarred to see Owens bagging groceries that she snapped his photo and sent it to the Daily Mail, which ran the headline, “From learning lines to serving the long line!” Fox News picked up the story, and on Saturday a Twitter storm erupted-most of it shaming Fox News for shaming Owens for working for a living.
The editor Max Weiss wrote, “RT if you think Geoffrey Owens took a much more honorable path in his life than Bill Cosby.” Even Dana Loesch, the N.R.A. spokeswoman, weighed in: “I hate stories like this. He’s a man working hard, there’s shame in publishing this story but not in this man’s job.”
We don’t tend to think of actors as laborers, despite the robust unions that represent them-Actors’ Equity and SAG-AFTRA. The most visible actors serve as aspirational figures, celebrated for their glamour and luxury.
As plenty of people pointed out on social media, conservative outlets like Fox paint Hollywood actors as coastal élites, out of touch with working Americans, only to turn around and “Expose” one of them for earning a paycheck.
There was, of course, a racial element as well, which the writer Mark Harris described as a subtext that begins “See? Even when you give them every opportunity, they still end up….” One wonders if Owens would have drawn any attention if he’d been spotted working as a coal miner or some other “Salt of the earth” job thought of as honorable and manly, rather than in a “Softer” form of labor that is itself suffering from what The Atlantic called “The Silent Crisis of Retail Employment.”
Geoffrey Owens and Cynthia Nixon both became famous after starring on beloved sitcoms, which means that their work had value for millions of people.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Life as a Farmworker in Yuma’s Lettuce Fields”

On an early morning in February, the couple picked me up at my motel at 4 a.m. to show me one of their lettuce crews, where I met Manuel, at work.
Life in general is not easy for these workers, and their aches don’t stop when they leave the fields.
The Association of Farmworker Opportunity Programs describes farm work as “Extremely low-wage work Most farmworkers earn less than $10,000 per year from what is often backbreaking and dangerous labor.”
Originally from Guanajuato, Mexico, she moved to San Luis Río Colorado, Sonora, when she was 12, and started working as a farm worker in California’s Salinas Valley that same year.
The Yuma Fresh Vegetable Association, a multifaceted nonprofit that promotes, protects, and lobbies for Yuma vegetables, also runs Labor of Love, a program that occasionally delivers breakfast to workers out in the fields, or gives them surprise shopping sprees at Target.
I asked Pablo Francisco Delgado, originally from Guanajuato, Mexico, and a planter at JV Farms, how many Americans work in the fields in the Yuma Valley.
Bill Scott, of Amigo farms, put it bluntly: “Growers are at the shippers’ whim.” The brunt of the instability in the agricultural sector is borne by the men and women who work in the fields.
She gave me an example: Hairnets and gloves seen in the fields aren’t meant to protect the worker, she said; they are “Meant to protect the food from the worker.” For her, the priority is clear, and the priority of big ag is not the worker.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Work 40 Hours in 16.7”

No matter how many hours I worked, it never seemed to fill it up.
Everything in just 16.7 hours a week?!Right now you’re probably thinking, “I work more than that in two days! And you’re trying to tell me that’s all I need to work in an entire week?”.
I truly work 16.7 hours each weekand I get about five times more accomplished in those few hours than in the other 25 hours.
You can work smarter without having to work harder.
I’d be equally enthusiastic and motivated about each one, wouldn’t be interrupted, and would finish my day’s work in less than three hours.
My energy level and attitude affect my work and output, so I had to stay present to how I was feeling, and master myself.
Of course, I also had to find work I enjoyed, that fulfilled merather than work that drained me.
Want to go further?Slowly but surely, Pomodoro has forever change how I work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Chanel shoes, but no salary: how one woman exposed the scandal of the French fashion industry”

So it is likely to have been an ugly surprise to the French fashion industry that her PhD – now a book entitled The Most Beautiful Job in the World – has opened up its secretive profession in such a dramatically public way.
Mensitieri points out that working in fashion means being seen in a constantly updated uniform of beautiful, expensive clothes and accessories – paid for by vouchers such as the one Mia received instead of a salary.
One interviewee, a former fashion journalist at a glossy magazine, describes how she was dropped by her coterie of friends and colleagues one day.
“The message is, you don’t have to be paid because you are lucky to be there at all. Working in fashion is hyper socially validating, even if you’re unpaid. That’s an important point for me. Fashion presents itself as something exceptional, a world outside the ordinary,” she says.
France’s fashion industry is intensely bound up with national identity.
“The students there know they will be exploited but they don’t see themselves as exploited.” Professor Angela McRobbie, at Goldsmiths, a specialist in new forms of labour in the creative economy, who teaches feminist theory, gender and popular culture, explains, “French fashion doesn’t have some of the underground roots or edginess that British fashion does. It’s much more corporate and top heavy. Whereas critical theory is taught in fashion schools here or in the States, in France there’s none of that.” It was McRobbie who invited Mensitieri to speak at the Society of Arts, in London: “Hers is a very important book,” she says.
Who are the exploiters? LVMH, the French leader of the world’s luxury goods market, owns 70 luxury fashion brands, including Louis Vuitton, Christian Dior and Fendi.
“I’m not an optimistic person, but there are interesting things happening at the fringes. There is a strong anti-fashion movement in the UK and, in France, models are working together for better working conditions.” It’s advice that some people working in the fashion industry may not want to hear.

The orginal article.