Summary of “On Getting Rejected a Lot”

You can be the most talented photographer, the most brilliant scientist, or the most diligent activist, and most things still won’t work out.
The more successful they are, the more rejections they’ve had-because they’re putting themselves out there, taking risks, and still moving forward.
Want a job as a trekking guide in Iceland, which would involve travel and the chance for gorgeous photos? You might as well apply, because it probably won’t work out! Want an internship with the UN or an artist’s residency in Antarctica? It probably won’t happen, but give it a go!
Spend a few hours a week looking for opportunities that would literally change your life: Jobs around the world.
Don’t spam editors or be sloppy, and respect the norms of the industry by, for example, always disclosing simultaneous submissions; you don’t want things to backfire if you do get the go-ahead. But give yourself a goal number of rejections.
If you interview for a job you’re obsessed with, figure out what it is that appeals so much.
Maybe you didn’t realize how badly you wanted to live in Montana until you got rejected from a job in Montana.
That’s how you figure out what you really want.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tracking Down the $7.6 Million Teardrop Talbot-Lago”

Joe lives in a development a few miles west of the $15 million mansions lining the sea, on the workaday side of the Intracoastal Waterway.
Joe worked with his heirs to gain part ownership and traveled the U. S., interviewing past owners and authorities and tracking the car’s provenance.
Calling Joe a “South Florida hustler and con man,” they said they had only received $150,000 apiece from the sale of the Ferrari, while Joe took $2.4 million.
For two years, Joe went to work crafting a history of the Teardrop.
Somehow the stolen Teardrop had ended up in the hands of Joe’s friend turned enemy, who had sold it for more than $7 million to the novice collector.
Motor-­vehicle authorities contacted the Milwaukee police, who called Mueller-its rightful owner-and the FBI. Mueller, who was then working with Joe to find the car, demanded the return of the Teardrop.
After his arrest, he became cooperative, giving them the motor as well as his computers and files, which contained information tying him to what Joe believes is a $60 million network of international car thieves-all run by his former friend.
“I’ve been coming here for years,” Joe says, sucking down an oyster.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Quit Trying To Be A Superhero”

Hi there, superhero! How are you? Working on a lot of projects simultaneously? Planning a holiday? Taking care of the family? Paying the bills? Hitting the gym every day? Going out with friends? And always solving problems that are not even yours?
You might think that too much work and responsibilities cause burn out.
I’ve been working hard ever since I was in my teens.
Throughout the years, you’ll get better at coping with stress, effectiveness, and working more hours.
You can’t handle a lot of work if you dread work and always look for pleasure.
The question you should ask yourself is not: “Can I handle hard work?”.
If you want to work with others, you have to trust them.
If you don’t know what your purpose is, work on it now.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Column One: Hollywood scenic painter Mike Denering can’t quite put down his brush”

In his faded jeans, button-down shirt and sneakers that betray a hint of paint speckles, Mike Denering cut an unassuming figure ambling across the Fox Studios lot in Century City.
At 66, Denering is one of Hollywood’s last scenic painters.
Scenic painter Mike Denering in front of a mural, a scene from “The Seven Year Itch” that he restored back in 2016 with artist Jim Katranis on the exterior of Stage 10 at Fox Studios in Los Angeles.
From left are scenic artists Mike Denering, John Moffitt and Jonathan Williams.
Robin Williams in “What Dreams May Come.” Mike Denering and John Moffitt were the lead scenic artists on the 1998 film, using digital and hand-painted elements.
In 1989, Denering bought a house in Sun Valley, a drowsy rustic community at the base of the Verdugo Mountains about 15 miles north of Hollywood.
When Denering started, scenic artists often painted in the plein-air technique – working outside to be able to replicate the gradations of light and color in nature.
Mike Denering was a scenic artist for the 1988 film “Die Hard,” starring Bruce Willis.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Quit Trying To Be A Superhero”

Hi there, superhero! How are you? Working on a lot of projects simultaneously? Planning a holiday? Taking care of the family? Paying the bills? Hitting the gym every day? Going out with friends? And always solving problems that are not even yours?
You might think that too much work and responsibilities cause burn out.
I’ve been working hard ever since I was in my teens.
Throughout the years, you’ll get better at coping with stress, effectiveness, and working more hours.
You can’t handle a lot of work if you dread work and always look for pleasure.
The question you should ask yourself is not: “Can I handle hard work?”.
If you want to work with others, you have to trust them.
If you don’t know what your purpose is, work on it now.

The orginal article.

Summary of “America’s Hot New Job Is Being a Rich Person’s Servant”

Because they often cannot afford to live near their place of work, they endure long commutes from lower-cost neighborhoods.
Optimistically, these jobs offer autonomy for workers and convenience for consumers, many of whom aren’t wealthy.
These laborers often do the work of employees with the legal protections of contractors-which is to say, hardly any.
In both types of situation, the relationship between wealth workers and their customers is easily exploited and often impersonalized-an oddity considering the intimacy of the work, which involves feeling hair, touching nails, massaging skin, entering a stranger’s home to assemble his bedroom, or welcoming him into your car.
In the late 19th century, more than half of women worked in domestic and personal service.
Their work was also less anonymous; the hired help tended to live with their employers, where they would cook, clean, and care for children.
These workers were integrated into family life in a way that is unthinkable for the anonymous wealth workers of the modern world.
The workers of the new servant economy don’t live with their employers, but rather sleep many miles away where they can afford a bedroom.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Baking With the Bread Whisperers of Paris”

Something like baking bread. For me, this was the most sincere homage I could possibly pay to the country that had adopted me.
Bread was as devoid of interest to me as tap water until my grade-school friend Peter Hoenig introduced me to the rock-salt-speckled pretzel bread that his Viennese mother baked herself and draped with a slice of smoky ham.
So I offered them the short version of how I had fallen in love with bread, ending with the never-to-be-forgotten adage of my first French boyfriend, the one who insisted that “a meal without bread is even worse than bad sex.” Needless to say, they loved that.
“What makes the quality of Lalos’ bread is the flour,” he explained.
“The quality of French bread has declined in many bakeries because the bread is baked with terrible flour made from industrially grown, genetically modified wheat. Here we work with flour from small mills like the Terres de Margerides in the Auvergne. There is no good bread without good flour, and there is no good flour without good grain, so we have to fight to break the really bad system that’s developed since World War II and return to growing old varieties of grain using the same methods our grandfathers did.”
He once worked as baker to the King of Morocco, a job that involved baking fresh croissants for the regent and his court of 300 in the desert, in ovens powered by generators.
“Always remember, Alec, baking is the marriage of science and instinct,” he told me, as we rolled out cigar-size lengths of sticky dough that would become ficelles.
Their work forms the very bedrock of Gallic cuisine since a meal without bread is unthinkable in France.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Meritocracy Harms Everyone”

At one elite northeastern elementary school, for example, a teacher posted a “Problem of the day,” which students had to solve before going home, even though no time was set aside for working on it.
The point of the exercise was to train fifth graders to snatch a few extra minutes of work time by multitasking or by sacrificing recess.
Wealthy students show higher rates of drug and alcohol abuse than poor students do.
A recent study of a Silicon Valley high school found that 54 percent of students displayed moderate to severe symptoms of depression and 80 percent displayed moderate to severe symptoms of anxiety.
Whereas aristocrats once considered themselves a leisure class, meritocrats work with unprecedented intensity.
In 2000, by contrast, a major law firm pronounced with equal confidence that a quota of 2,400 billable hours, “If properly managed,” was “Not unreasonable,” which is a euphemism for “Necessary for having a hope of making partner.” Because not all the hours a lawyer works are billable, billing 2,400 hours could easily require working from 8 a.m. until 8 p.m. six days a week, every week of the year, without vacation or sick days.
Today, the higher a person climbs on the org chart, the harder she is expected to work.
Amazon’s “Leadership principles” call for managers to have “Relentlessly high standards” and to “Deliver results.” The company tells managers that when they “Hit the wall” at work, the only solution is to “Climb the wall.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Are You Pursuing Your Vision of Career Success”

You’ve followed the path that everyone else told you would be the one to lead to success – to your dream job – only to find that your dream job doesn’t feel so dreamy after all.
A 2015 study by Gallup showed that only one-third of the American workforce feels actively engaged in their work.
Each generation is experiencing its own work identity crisis, trying to determine why their work isn’t working for them.
Millennials – social media natives who have never lived separate lives at work and at home – don’t look for work-life balance, but rather work-life alignment, where they can be the same person, with the same values, at home and in the office.
GenXers, finding themselves caught between raising children and nursing aging parents, are looking for work that contributes to managing these demands rather than working against them.
You achieve consonance when your work has purpose and meaning for you.
Connection gives you sightlines into how your everyday work serves that calling by solving the problem at hand, growing the company’s bottom line, or reaching that goal.
Control reflects how you are able to influence your connection to that calling in order to have some say in the assignment of projects, deadlines, colleagues, and clients; to offer input into shared goals; and to do work that contributes to your career trajectory and earnings.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Third Self”

Two hundred years before social media, the great French artist Eugène Delacroix lamented the necessary torment of avoiding social distractions in creative work; a century and a half later, Agnes Martin admonished aspiring artists to exercise discernment in the interruptions they allow, or else corrupt the mental, emotional, and spiritual privacy where inspiration arises.
Just as self-criticism is the most merciless kind of criticism and self-compassion the most elusive kind of compassion, self-distraction is the most hazardous kind of distraction, and the most difficult to protect creative work against.
Let all of them work, as ordinarily they do, in confident familiarity with whatever the work requires, and no more.
In creative work – creative work of all kinds – those who are the world’s working artists are not trying to help the world go around, but forward.
Part of this something-elseness, Oliver argues, is the uncommon integration of the creative self – the artist’s work cannot be separated from the artist’s whole life, nor can its wholeness be broken down into the mechanical bits-and-pieces of specific actions and habits.
Intellectual work sometimes, spiritual work certainly, artistic work always – these are forces that fall within its grasp, forces that must travel beyond the realm of the hour and the restraint of the habit.
The working, concentrating artist is an adult who refuses interruption from himself, who remains absorbed and energized in and by the work – who is thus responsible to the work Serious interruptions to work are never the inopportune, cheerful, even loving interruptions which come to us from another.
The most regretful people on earth are those who felt the call to creative work, who felt their own creative power restive and uprising, and gave to it neither power nor time.

The orginal article.