Summary of “How to Be More Productive Without Putting in Extra Hours”

Make sure you work on those before you move on to less critical tasks and you’ll find you feel a whole lot more productive at the end of the day.
The whole idea of working smarter rather than harder stems from the fact that many of us put in more and more hours only to find we don’t get more done.
If you evaluate yourself by what you actually get done rather than the time it takes to get something done, you’ll start to notice a difference in how you work.
If you start keeping a list of everything you get done in a day, you might be surprised how much more motivated you are to do work that matters and stay focused so you get even more done.
Although you might be tempted to let go of your routine entirely on your days off, our CEO has found that maintaining a weekend routine that doesn’t differ too much from his weekdays works well: The more he let go of his routine on the weekends, the longer it took him to pick it up again during the week.
Some of us struggle to stop working, rather than start working.
You could make this work with an evening cut-off time to get you out of work by, say, 5 p.m. Ogle gets up early, so he has five to six hours of work time before his midday cut-off point.
Light exercise works well for me, so I like to walk home from the office or take a walk after work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Myth of the Skills Gap”

Proponents of the idea tell an intuitively appealing story: information technology has hit American firms like a whirlwind, intensifying demand for technical skills and leaving unprepared American workers in the dust.
The mismatch between high employer requirements and low employee skills leads to bad outcomes such as high unemployment and slow economic growth.
The basic strategy is to ask: what skills do employers demand, and do the employers that demand high skill levels have trouble hiring workers?
The data imply that we should be careful about calling for more technical skills without specifying which skills we are talking about.
My data show that employers looking for higher-level computer skills generally do not have a harder time filling job openings.
Proponents of the skill-gap theory sometimes assert that the problem, if not a lack of STEM skills, is actually the result of a poor attitude or inadequate soft skills among younger workers.
Only 15 percent of computer help desks demand programming, a number that is slightly lower than the percentage of manufacturing plants that require programming skills for their production workers.
We would ultimately like to ratchet up both employer skill requirements and employee skill levels, but doing so requires that we think not only about adjusting worker skill levels, but also about changing employer behavior.

The orginal article.

Summary of “19 Things Future Multimillionaires Do in Their 20s”

The truth is that even if you’re starting with little, there are things you can do early in your life and career-in your 20s, mostly-that can make it far more likely you’ll be very wealthy by the time you hit 30.
Boil down their experiences and there are common things they did earlier in life.
As a young person, spend your time doing things that matter to you and that build value.
Lots of people in their 20s quickly submit to things they shouldn’t.
Volunteer, but do so with three things in mind: First, volunteer to do things that you feel good about.
Second, volunteer to do things that will be learning experiences.
Life is a lot more fun if you spend it working hard at things you really enjoy and value.
Travel, write, play music, jump out of airplanes-do the things you’ll be talking about for years to come.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to get paid to travel”

You want to travel, but you don’t have the money to travel.
Looking to solve labor shortages, population declines and other economic issues, destinations around the world are offering people the opportunity to travel in exchange for labor, not money.
Here are some of the best options if you want to travel free or even get paid to do it.
The program by the Xanterra Travel Collection, which manages the Yellowstone National Park Lodges, is offering part-time, short-term jobs for people over the age of 18 who want to experience the park in a different way.
Most travel opportunities fall into the luxury category.
Photographers, sculptors, historians, painters, science writers and children’s novelists have been among the chosen program participants given the opportunity to travel to Antarctica on the National Science Foundation’s dime.
There are plenty of options around the globe for the taking, and for every travel style.
You can search Workaway, an online community for sustainable travel and cultural exchange, to find opportunities to volunteer or work in 178 countries, like helping out at an alpaca farm in Estonia or working as an au pair in Andorra.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Wendell Berry’s Lifelong Dissent”

At a time when political conflict runs deep and erects high walls, the Kentucky essayist, novelist, and poet Wendell Berry maintains an arresting mix of admirers.
From the beginning, Berry has written the land’s history alongside the history of those who have worked it or been worked on it.
Even as Berry made himself a student of the flaws of local life, he sought to refashion its patterns of community and culture into something that might repair them.
A student of material interdependence cannot ignore that the systems driving these forms of ecological devastation are just as real as the topsoil that Berry lays down on his farm at Lane’s Landing and just as powerful as the floodwaters from the Kentucky River.
A contrarian is least essential when his dogged dissent becomes an era’s lazy common sense; Berry risks becoming, willy-nilly, the philosopher of the Whole Foods meat counter.
Throughout his work, Berry likes to iron out paradoxes in favor of building a unified vision, but he is himself a bundle of paradoxes, some more generative than others.
For most of his life, Berry has written as a kind of elegist, detailing the tragic path that we have taken and recalling other paths now mostly fading.
If these strands of resistance and reconstruction persist, even prevail, Wendell Berry’s lifelong dissent-stubborn, sometimes maddening, not quite like anything else of its era-will deserve a place in our memory.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Death of Hollywood’s Middle Class”

In 2015, Jack Allison, a comedian with a nerdy affect and an impish wit, was a staff writer on The Jimmy Kimmel Show, doing what he loved best: Hanging out with a bunch of other funny people, writing jokes, and downing Twizzlers.
Almost all of the focus on this upheaval has been on viewers’ first-world problem of too many good shows to watch or the corporate gamesmanship between iconic Hollywood conglomerates and the tech giants who seek to usurp them in delivering the world its entertainment.
The tech entrants into Hollywood typically do not sell their shows to other platforms, which means there are no syndicated reruns, and networks, feeling the pressure to keep up, air far fewer reruns.
A writer on a Netflix show is paid differently from someone on a Hulu or YouTube Premium show, because fees are based on the number of subscribers that a service has.
More recently, the WGA successfully loosened the exclusive holds that studios traditionally held over lower-paid writers, which keep them from seeking other employment while they’re working on a show-which meant that if you’d finished working on one season and were waiting to see if the show was re-upped for a second, you couldn’t seek another gig.
Even with these attempts to level the playing field, there is still the fact that a season for a streaming show is typically less than half the length of a traditional network show.
If someone like Allison theoretically went from a network late-night show to its streaming equivalent, say, Norm Macdonald Has a Show on Netflix, or Sarah Silverman’s I Love You, America on Hulu, it’s a completely different financial outlook.
“My husband is a writer and director. The fact that I have that protection, meaning if one of us were to drop dead, we would definitely still have a source of income to take care of our kids. If I’m only on one show and it’s only 20 weeks, what am I going to do the rest of the year? And if the show is 10 episodes?”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Hardest Props I Ever Made”

“I’ve always felt that if you’re noticing the props, you’re doing your job wrong,” says Robin L. Miller, a veteran prop master.
“It’s literally a rolling office and fabrication place,” says Miller of the 50-foot semi-trailer that houses all of the props and prop materials he might need.
Some prop masters are wistful for the old days of independent cinema, before CGI. “You had a van and a bunch of tools and you made almost everything you needed for the script,” says Miller.
A lot of times, the props are there for an actor; they don’t have to be the star.
I went, “20? I’m going to Fiji with these things!” And I needed as many as I could get, because things happen to props all the time.
Gallaher Glenn: Angels & Demons had tons of really interesting props.
Even props that are ultimately science fiction or completely made up, there’s always some basis that grounds it to reality.
He made all my prop heroin to make it look like it was heroin.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Could Time-Blocking Replace Your To-Do List?”

Time-blocking is essentially organizing your day in a series of time slots.
Instead of writing a list of tasks that take as long as they take, with a time-blocked approach, each of these time periods is devoted to a task or tasks.
“This follows because it allows you to schedule work for the time where it makes the most sense-batching together small things, tackling hard things when you have the long stretches to make progress, and so on. The other advantage is that it provides you more accurate feedback on how much free time you actually have most days and how long certain recurring tasks actually take,” he says.
Why Time Block? Organizing your day through time blocks instead of to-dos makes sense because of the discipline and order it applies to your tasks, says time management expert Kevin Kruse, author of 15 Secrets Successful People Know About Time Management.
Organizing your time instead of your tasks also has psychological benefits, Kruse says.
Are there work cycles that could affect how much uninterrupted time you will have? And what times of day do you have the most energy or are best suited to do the tasks you need to do?
“Don’t schedule a hard task in a time of day where you typically lag, and don’t schedule a big task in a small amount of time. Wishful thinking can’t change the reality of your schedule,” Newport adds.
If you’re chronically running late, revisit the amount of time you’re devoting to your tasks.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Crown Jewel: How Olivia Colman Is Reinventing Superstardom”

Colman and Sinclair met as young actors in Cambridge: He was at the university, and she was living in the town, working as a house cleaner, a job she loved.
Cleaning houses let her stay in town, crashing lectures, and, on a whim, auditioning for student-theater productions.
Colman worked as a temp and cleaner in London while Sinclair finished his Cambridge degree; when he went on to the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School, she followed him, still smitten, assuming that she wasn’t drama-school material herself.
As he brought friends by for dinner Colman found she loved hearing about their work at school.
It has become an irresistible irony that Colman, the house cleaner who tagged along to Bristol with her drama-school boyfriend, is now the family’s star actor and its lead breadwinner, too.
In a notoriously peripatetic profession, Colman has remained close to home; Them That Follow, filmed in Ohio, was her first production in America, and her two weeks on set was the longest she has spent away from her family.
It’s partly on account of her family that Colman does less theater than she used to-a loss in the eyes of many.
A theatrical run, which provides off-time during the day, is great when there’s a baby in the house, Colman explains, but now that her kids span between kindergarten age and the early teens, it keeps her from tucking them into bed-a ritual she cherishes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘I feel bombarded with to-dos’: the hell of life admin”

According to one 2018 survey of 2,000 Brits, the average adult carries out 109 life admin tasks a year, from sorting out car insurance to paying council tax; about half the respondents admitted they struggled to keep up with household paperwork.
Life admin might be at once the most boring and overwhelming anxiety of our age: look closely, and we are procrastinating and blind panicking our way into an organisational crisis.
Now I’m 31, and my inability to manage life admin has become a shameful character flaw.
My admin ineptitude still makes me feel I’m lacking a fundamental piece of the “Adult” jigsaw.
“A lot of my admin is keyboard-mediated – for example, I do my bank accounts online. My dad gave my mum the household cash each week and she separated it into different old handbags. If she wanted something, she’d go to the relevant handbag and see what she had in notes and small change. And if you needed the bank, you had to go there. For my parents, there seemed to be fewer things to think about. I now feel bombarded with to-dos, but many of them take no time at all. I can hit a button and it’s done. The quality of the interaction is different, and perhaps that’s why it can feel like drudge work – there’s rarely a human there.”
Emens argues that, “Certain features of modern life make admin more pervasive. One of them is the rise of the bureaucratic state: we have more paperwork to complete, particularly around things like weddings, divorces, births and deaths. And another is technology, so admin reaches us with greater insistence and frequency. People expect us to respond to emails and texts; there’s an escalation of demands.” And where once we might have outsourced the business of booking a holiday, or the drudgery of filling in our tax return to an expert, we now turn to Airbnb, Skyscanner and Booking.com, or download apps such as QuickBooks.
Millions of us watch “Admin routine” YouTube videos and follow “Cleanfluencers”, Marie Kondo disciples who have become famous for their tips on effective life admin management, as well as cleaning.
As Emens points out, “Even people who avoid life admin have some really useful strategies to teach those who get it all done – namely, that there are some tasks you shouldn’t devote masses of energy to, because it’s not an effective use of your time.” In a world where there is more junk life admin than ever before, we all need to get strategic.

The orginal article.