Summary of “How To Be Productive When Your Life Is In Chaos”

As you and I both know, that’s not how life works.
We accept that life is chaos and find a way to adapt ourselves.
How do you adapt when life is uncertain? How do you still manage to be productive when you can’t even catch your breath before you have to deal with the next thing?
Before you know it, your whole life can be consumed by something random.
Even though it’s great to be in love, there’s more to life.
We can’t allow ourselves to forget where we are going in life.
No matter how hectic your life is, you can always find 10 minutes to sit down and reflect.
Once you live your life that way, you can’t even function properly without challenges.

The orginal article.

Summary of “If You Want A Dream Career, Ask Yourself These 3 Questions”

Have you ever thought about how long your career actually lasts? If you ask me, your career ends when your life ends.
You want to pick a career that gives you a good outlook.
The last thing you want to become is an unfulfilled career hopper.
A person who likes everything and picks a different career every two years.
That’s why you want to make a smart decision about what kind of career you pursue.
I’ve personally used the advice from the renowned management consultant, Peter Drucker, to create a career that’s fulfilling.
Answering these questions have helped me to create my dream career.
When you answer these three questions, I’m sure you will find your dream career.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Meet the scientists who are training AI to diagnose mental illness”

They want to compare healthy people’s brains to those of people with mental health disorders.
Psychiatry is seeking to measure the mind, which is not quite the same thing as the brain For the Virginia Tech team looking at my brain, computational psychiatry had already teased out new insights while they were working on a study published in Science in 2008.
The algorithm can find new patterns in our social behaviors, or see where and when a certain therapeutic intervention is effective, perhaps providing a template for preventative mental health treatment through exercises one can do to rewire the brain.
With those patterns in hand, Chiu imagines the ability to diagnose more acutely, say, a certain kind of depression, one that regularly manifests itself in a specific portion of the brain.
The fMRI has its problems: for instance, scientists are not truly looking at the brain, according to Science Alert.
There is a brain chemical composition that is associated with some depressed people, Greenberg says, but not all who meet the DSM criteria.
The lab’s approach asks what the brain is doing during a task while considering the entire brain.
As the afternoon sun slants through the windows of a common area – partitioned by a math-covered wall – Chiu and King-Casas take turns bouncing their young baby and discussing a future of psychiatry in which she may live: algorithm-driven diagnostic models, targeted therapies, and brain training methods, driven by real-time fMRI results, that shift psychiatry into the arena of preventative medicine.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Time for Happiness”

Some of the best time diary research suggests that in the United States, men’s leisure time has increased by six to nine hours a week over the past 50 years, and women’s leisure time has risen four to eight hours a week.
If the solution to time poverty is so simple – just make choices that give you more time – then why are we all still stressed?
Because we overestimate the amount of time needed to enjoy an experience, we end up wasting small pockets of free time that we could use more effectively.
Last, we suffer from something called future time slack – the belief that we’ll have more time in the future than we do in the present.
HR departments may think that how employees choose between time and money has little to do with them, but a large body of research shows that organizational factors shape the way employees perceive their time and can increase their feelings of stress and undermine social connections and happiness.
The Long View We should also think about how our money and time decisions might have consequences for our happiness farther down the road. If we choose a job in which we make a lot of money but work 80 hours a week, our personal relationships and happiness could suffer in the long term.
My data suggests that as people age and have objectively less time left in their lives, they naturally start to favor more time over more money in their decisions.
Ask yourself whether you make it easier for your employees to ask for more time to complete projects, to spend less time stuck in traffic, to waste less time taking cheaper indirect flights, to reduce their stress and improve their productivity.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stop Trying To Do Everything”

There’s one important thing about all this working, hustling, striving, and achieving more: You can’t do everything at the same time.
So if you take on too many things, you end up spread too thin.
Success Adds Up. Real success happens when we focus on one thing at a time.
“Where I’d had huge success, I had narrowed my concentration to one thing, and where my success varied, my focus had too.”
Are you working on a lot of things? Is your attention not on one thing? There’s a big chance that you will not achieve the best possible results.
Another thing: Buffett acquired 99% of his net worth after he became 50.
You can achieve big things with small actions, that build up over time.
If you want to see the impact of compounding in your own life, it requires you to focus on one thing at a time and always look at the bigger picture.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why you can’t be productive without routines and rituals”

6 minute Read. There are few things that impact your daily productivity, career trajectory, and overall well-being as much as your routines.
According to research, up to 40% of our daily actions are powered by habits-the unconscious actions and routines we’ve developed over time.
So how do routines and rituals fit into the modern workday? And how can we develop ones that maximize our ability to do meaningful work?
Not everyone consciously crafts their routines to maximize their time.
Blindly following someone else’s routines won’t make you as productive as them.
While routines keep us grounded, they don’t always do much to help us get through the day.
Routines power your day, but rituals help you get through them.
While routines help us feel in control of our time, rituals make sure we stick to our plans.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Resilience Is About Recharging, Not Endurance”

We race to get all our ground work done: packing, going through TSA, doing a last-minute work call, calling each other, then boarding the plane.
Lack of recovery – whether by disrupting sleep with thoughts of work or having continuous cognitive arousal by watching our phones – is costing our companies $62 billion a year in lost productivity.
We “Stop” work sometimes at 5PM, but then we spend the night wrestling with solutions to work problems, talking about our work over dinner, and falling asleep thinking about how much work we’ll do tomorrow.
The scientists cite a definition of “Workaholism” as “Being overly concerned about work, driven by an uncontrollable work motivation, and investing so much time and effort to work that it impairs other important life areas.”
In her excellent book, The Sleep Revolution, Arianna Huffington wrote, “We sacrifice sleep in the name of productivity, but ironically our loss of sleep, despite the extra hours we spend at work, adds up to 11 days of lost productivity per year per worker, or about $2,280.”
If you’re trying to build resilience at work, you need adequate internal and external recovery periods.
Try to not have lunch at your desk, but instead spend time outside or with your friends – not talking about work.
We are usually tired already by the time we get on a plane, and the cramped space and spotty internet connection make work more challenging.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Post-Work: The Radical Idea of a World Without Jobs”

In the US, “Belief in work is crumbling among people in their 20s and 30s”, says Benjamin Hunnicutt, a leading historian of work.
The growth of productivity, or the value of what is produced per hour worked, is slowing across the rich world – despite the constant measurement of employee performance and intensification of work routines that makes more and more jobs barely tolerable.
“Either automation or the environment, or both, will force the way society thinks about work to change,” says David Frayne, a radical young Welsh academic whose 2015 book The Refusal of Work is one of the most persuasive post-work volumes.
“All cultures thought of work as a means to an end, not an end in itself.” From urban ancient Greece to agrarian societies, work was either something to be outsourced to others – often slaves – or something to be done as quickly as possible so that the rest of life could happen.
In 1979, Bernard Lefkowitz, then a well-known American journalist, published Breaktime: Living Without Work in a Nine to Five World, a book based on interviews with 100 people who had given up their jobs.
Stronge suggests a daily routine for post-work citizens that would include a provocative degree of state involvement: “You get your UBI payment from the government. Then you get a form from your local council telling you about things going on in your area: a five-a-side football tournament, say, or community activism – Big Society stuff, almost.” Other scenarios he proposes may disappoint those who dream of non-stop leisure: “I’m under no illusion that paid work is going to disappear entirely. It just may not be directed by someone else. You take as long as you want, have a long lunch, spread the work though the day.”
Tired of the never-ending task of making work better, some socialists have latched on to post-work, he argues, in the hope that exploitation can finally be ended by getting rid of work altogether.
Creating a more benign post-work world will be more difficult now than it would have been in the 70s. In today’s lower-wage economy, suggesting people do less work for less pay is a hard sell.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jason Rezaian’s ‘Prisoner’: Book excerpt describes his first terrifying hours inside Iranian prison”

Jason would spend 18 months in Iran’s Evin prison, and Yeganeh was separately imprisoned there for 72 days.
So at a time when it was too risky to cover the day-to-day politics, Iran’s lack of avocados became an obsession I had to get to the bottom of.
The very simple fact that the beloved avocado was almost unknown in Iran proved the first part of my argument: that Iran was cut off from the world, even in benign ways.
“I think the time is now for the American people to connect more closely to Iranian society however they can. And I’m offering a bridge to do just that. Hope you join me for the ride. I will bring the avocado to Iran, but I can’t do it without your support. The future of Persian guacamole is in your hands.”
“They’ve changed me into prison clothes. Why are you not in prison clothes?”.
“He’s afraid,” the first voice, the one that belonged to the Great Judge, said to the others in the room.
10 harrowing details about Jason Rezaian and Yeganeh Salehi’s imprisonment in Iran.
Jason Rezaian’s wife, mother describe their tortuous final hours in Iran.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What the Shutdown Means for a T.S.A. Agent at America’s Busiest Airport”

Earlier this week, Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, which is the busiest in the country and also the biggest employer in Georgia, announced security-line waiting times of nearly an hour and a half-more than twice that of any other airport in the country.
On account of the prolonged government shutdown, which began on December 22nd and does not appear to be ending anytime soon, Transportation Security Administration officers are not being paid, and a number of them have decided not to come to work.
“I’ve been cussed out by passengers. Somebody yesterday, in one of these long lines, called an officer a ‘fat heifer.’ I was called a racist and told, ‘That’s why Trump doesn’t like you,’ because I told the man to take his water out. The guy said, ‘I don’t have to.’ I said, ‘Sir, if your time is valuable, you need to take it out.'”.
“At work, I make jokes and talk. I have to. Some people I work with don’t care. They’re pissed. But I just want people the hell out of my face. I don’t want them to linger with their attitude. They’re already agitated: their private jet is broken and they had to get on this regular plane. So let’s get them out as quickly and safely as possible. I’m not a mall cop who wants to flex.”
“People from other airports want to come here because Atlanta is booming and it’s easier to live with a government job. We have a lot of transfers from New York. Coming here is great for your résumé. My dream was to make my T.S.A. job finance my beauty work. But you don’t have a lot of room to have a side job, a social life, to be on social media, to even wear your uniform. They want you to cover up your T.S.A. patches on your uniform shoulders so you aren’t exposed, because people hate T.S.A.”.
“It’s thirty minutes to three hours to process people. The hour-and-a-half wait times here recently in the domestic terminal could easily turn into three-hour wait times if we did everything extremely strictly, by the book. Imagine going from twenty officers down to four. It won’t necessarily be less safe, but it will take a lot longer.”
“I have co-workers that are viva la revolución personalities. They want change now, and they want to be part of it: ‘We should stop coming in during the shutdown and let them feel the pressure.’ For me and my household, I’ll show up. I’ve been through worse. I’ve lived some life. I have some other skill sets, thank God. Other people don’t have that.”
“The focus right now is the Super Bowl. If we don’t get a real check on the 25th, the word is ‘I’m not coming.’ And see what happens then. Everything would come to a halt.”

The orginal article.