Summary of “Learning Is Supposed to Feel Uncomfortable”

Here’s the thing: While the act of learning is primarily intellectual, behavioral, or methodological, the experience of learning is primarily emotional.
It’s the emotional experience of learning – of being a beginner and making mistakes, often publicly – that often keeps people from even trying to learn.
“I don’t want to be harsh,” I told her, “But honestly, I wouldn’t trust you as a leader if I didn’t see you learning as a participant.”
Because while learning may not be that hard, being a learner – a beginner at something – can be very hard.
They are the inescapable growth pains that come with learning, developing, and becoming better at something.
Then look for learning situations where the stakes are low – maybe a class where you’re not expected to be an expert or you don’t know anyone else.
Learning takes time and comfort takes experience.
That said, there is one thing the workshop did make me more comfortable doing: staying in the discomfort of learning long enough to learn.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Inside J.J. Abrams’s Bad Robot, the coolest office in Hollywood”

3 minute Read. Taking up a cozy space of real estate on the ground floor of Bad Robot’s office is what’s simply known as the Workshop.
“J.J. was very deliberate about how he wanted the building created,” says Beth Waisler, Bad Robot’s Workshop Manager.
In true Bad Robot fashion, the workshop started as Abrams’s analog playground.
Initially, there were no plans for a Bad Robot online shop.
“Though the workshop exists as a way to express the way we think and to make things, we’re always thinking about when we expand that or what that would be,” says Katie McGrath, co-CEO of Bad Robot.
Bad Robot’s reception area envelops you with shelves of toys, games, and tchotchkes.
Abrams discovered the Beastlies in a comic book shop where Levings worked, reached out to her to see if she wanted to collaborate, and now her bug-eyed monsters scored a deal with Mattel and are in the works to become a TV, film, and/or game franchise.
Abrams bought an Ohio letterpress shop even before Bad Robot moved into its office.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Heroin for middle-class nerds’: how Warhammer conquered gaming”

In 2017, the same company was the publicly traded British stock that outperformed every other: Games Workshop, a high-street retailer of science fiction and fantasy miniatures, now carries a market capitalisation of more than £1bn. But how did a company founded 40 years ago with one shop in Hammersmith, west London, become so successful? The answer lies in Warhammer 40,000 – 40k, as it is usually known; a sprawling tabletop conflict game in which two players fight with collectible armies, including the space marines of the fascist human Imperium and the ancient fallen angels of the Eldar, using rules found in a library of 30 or so source books.
The first is the motto of Warhammer 40,000: “In the grim darkness of the 41st millennium, there is only war.” In other words Games Workshop is a serious business, but it is not to be taken seriously.
Warhammer Fantasy Battle, a goblins-and-gnomes war game, and Warhammer 40k are ridiculous, over-the-top pastiches, created by people who were bored and angry under Margaret Thatcher, and channelled that rage into worlds where everyone is the villain, and hope has been extinguished for millennia.
That’s because the second thing to know about Games Workshop is, as Gillen says, that Warhammer was what middle-class nerds did instead of heroin.
Whose latest book, Die, is loosely inspired by his own experience playing the Warhammer role-playing game in his teens, says things have changed.
In 2015, the company abruptly discontinued its oldest game, Warhammer Fantasy Battle – even publishing in-game fiction that destroyed the world.
As well as the core Warhammer games, it has been releasing spin-offs at a steady clip.
Games Workshop had its own answer, in an FAQ it published before the launch of the latest edition of Warhammer 40,000.

The orginal article.