Summary of “Globalisation: the rise and fall of an idea that swept the world”

In a panel titled Governing Globalisation, the economist Dambisa Moyo, otherwise a well-known supporter of free trade, forthrightly asked the audience to accept that “There have been significant losses” from globalisation.
“Rejecting globalisation,” the American journalist George Packer has written, “Was like rejecting the sunrise.” Globalisation could take place in services, capital and ideas, making it a notoriously imprecise term; but what it meant most often was making it cheaper to trade across borders – something that seemed to many at the time to be an unquestionable good.
Called “Anti-globalisation” by the media, and the “Alter-globalisation” or “Global justice” movement by its participants, it tried to draw attention to the devastating effect that free trade policies were having, especially in the developing world, where globalisation was supposed to be having its most beneficial effect.
That month, Martin Wolf argued in a column that globalisation had “Lost dynamism”, due to a slackening of the world economy, the “Exhaustion” of new markets to exploit and a rise in protectionist policies around the world.
Possessed of a panoply of elite titles – former chief economist of the World Bank, former Treasury secretary, president emeritus of Harvard, former economic adviser to President Barack Obama – Summers was renowned in the 1990s and 2000s for being a blustery proponent of globalisation.
From 1948 to 1990, world trade grew at an annual average of nearly 7% – faster than the post-communist years, which we think of as the high point of globalisation.
In his 2011 book The Globalization Paradox, Rodrik concluded that “We cannot simultaneously pursue democracy, national determination, and economic globalisation.” The results of the 2016 elections and referendums provide ample testimony of the justness of the thesis, with millions voting to push back, for better or for worse, against the campaigns and institutions that promised more globalisation.
One reason, says Wolf, was that “a very, very large proportion of the gains from globalisation – by no means all – have been exploited. We have a more open world economy to trade than we’ve ever had before.” Citing The Great Convergence, Wolf noted that supply chains have already expanded, and that future developments, such as automation and the use of robots, looked to undermine the promise of a growing industrial workforce.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This is your brain on Disneyland: A Disney addict's quest to discover why he loves the parks so much”

My name is Todd and I am addicted to Disney theme parks.
If anyone should be able to articulate why we love Disney parks, it’s a former head of Walt Disney Imagineering who wrote speeches for Walt.
Irving Biederman, a professor of psychology at USC, has been to some Disney parks and his gripe is one I regularly hear from friends: too fake.
Disney devotion can connote endless adolescence, but as Biederman began to interview me, the ways in which I engage with the parks became more clear.
Other times, I’ll bring work, sit with my laptop in the lobby of the Grand Californian, only venturing into one of the parks when I need to clear my head. Increasingly, I’ve been approaching the parks from a more studious perspective, investigating its history and reporting on new developments.
It’s no secret that many gravitate to Disney parks for family bonding experiences, which the parks leverage at every photo op.
“You could speak to a stranger. You feel safe. You know you’re going to be respected. Everything is clean. It’s an example that you take back to your own community. ‘Why can’t it be like this? Why can’t we treat people like we get treated at the Disney parks? Why can’t our streets be as clean as it is at Disney?'”.
Theme parks are a thoroughly modern invention based as much on technology as the belief in pixie dust, and we’re only just beginning to understand their growing role as a storytelling medium.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Fit Two Weeks’ Worth of Clothes in a Carry-On and Other Travel Tips”

You can always avoid checking your carry-on, even on a full flight.
How to fit two weeks’ worth of clothing in a carry-on.
Using them I can usually get two weeks’ worth of clothes to fit in a carry-on bag.
A two-point plan for scoring the best flight deals every time.
If there’s a place I haven’t been, I allow them to dictate where I travel next-like when I went to Bali, because I found a ticket for $450 from L.A. And Chase Sapphire Reserve is the best thing that’s ever happened to me; it blows the American Express Platinum card out of the water for anyone who calls himself a real traveler.
The annual fee is $450 per year, but you get a $300 travel credit every year, so if you charge a flight from New York to L.A? Boom! You get a $300 credit, so now the annual fee is really only $150. Where to shop in Africa.
It’s a short flight from Malindi, where most tourists go, and like much of the East African coast, it’s largely Muslim.
How to chop onions without crying, wherever you are in the world.

The orginal article.

Summary of “but this time no one is laughing”

More than half a millennium later, in a world dominated by indignation and outrage, and largely abandoned by laughter, a dose of the grotesque might help to better digest events, if only by having a good – and right kind of – laugh.
In his landmark Rabelais and His World, Bakhtin suggested that the laughter resounding through Rabelais’s work was particular, and practised at specific moments.
Laughter is no different than political systems, commercial relations or artistic practices: it evolves over time, the result and cause of material and social transformations.
Inclusive and communal, laughter left no one untouched; no less universal than faith, it was a bit more subversive.
What better reason for laughter? Not only did it defeat despair, but it also overturned the symbols of state power and violence – a dizzying liberation from time and place.
Carnival laughter is ‘directed at all and everyone, including the carnival’s participants’.
Medieval carnivals existed, for a limited time, to bring forth laughter.
Laughter is not among the many things that spill from the gaping mouth, housed at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, that now demands the attention of the world.

The orginal article.

Summary of “One of Africa’s best kept secrets”

Africa has a rich and complex history but there is widespread ignorance of this heritage.
A celebrated British historian once said there was only the history of Europeans in Africa.
A few years later, at Unesco’s Paris headquarters, I saw on the bookshelves of Ethiopian-born Deputy Director-General Getachew Engida a collection of volumes – the General History of Africa.
This, it turned out, is one of Unesco’s and the continent’s best kept secrets: Africa’s history written by African scholars.
Unesco helped African scholars put together the project, recruiting 350 experts, mostly from across Africa and from a range of disciplines, to compile eight volumes, starting from prehistory and continuing to the modern era.
At present there is none, or very little: there is only the history of the Europeans in Africa.
“The rest is largely darkness, like the history of pre-European, pre-Columbian America. And darkness is not a subject for history.”
The General History of Africa is a start and Unesco plans to incorporate its research into school syllabuses across the continent.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This is the Muslim tradition of sci-fi and speculative fiction”

Western readers often overlook the Muslim world’s speculative fiction.
The Virtuous City, written in the 9th century by the scholar Al-Farabi, was one of the earliest great texts produced by the nascent Muslim civilisation.
As well as political philosophy, debates about the value of reason were a hallmark of Muslim writing at this time.
The first Arabic novel, The Self-Taught Philosopher, was composed by Ibn Tufail, a Muslim physician from 12th-century Spain.
We also have the Muslim world to thank for one of the first works of feminist science fiction.
By the early 20th century, speculative fiction from the Muslim world emerged as a form of resistance to the forces of Western colonialism.
An even darker brand of fiction has emerged from Muslim cultures today.
Speculative fiction is often lumped in with European Romanticism and read as a reaction to the Industrial Revolution.

The orginal article.

Summary of “10 Habits That Change Boys Into Men”

Much has been said and written in recent years about the challenges of men and boys.
A common theme is that men and boys have become increasingly confused about their identity and role in society.
Girls outperform boys now at every level - from elementary school through graduate school.
According to the National Center for Education Statistics, boys are 30 percent more likely than girls to drop out of both high school and college.
Naturally, boys have a strong need for accomplishment and challenge.
Boys on the other hand, are often motivated by tangible experiences that relate to real life.
Get Intensive Physical StimulationShort and intensive learning spurts, followed by rigorous physical stimulation is a powerful and positive way for boys and men to learn.
The Need For Physical PainInterestingly, boys and girls experience pain differently.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Monocle’s View From Nowhere”

In the March 2017 redesign issue there are “Collaboration” ad packages with the nations of both Thailand and Portugal; each package appears next to unpaid Monocle editorial content about said countries.
Under an umbrella entity incorporated in Switzerland called Winkorp, Brûlé’s ad agency, Winkreative, sells creative services to companies that also often buy ads in Monocle.
On top of the Winkorp cake, he has added Monocle-branded clothing lines that can be bought through the magazine; hardcover books about home decoration and nation building; a 24/7 streaming radio station; retail stores around the world; and cafés in Tokyo and London that serve up a wan, placeless cuisine of Monocle chicken katsu sandwiches and Monocle taco salad bowls.
“If you believe you are a citizen of the world,” British Prime Minister Theresa May pronounced last year, “You are a citizen of nowhere.” May became prime minister in no small part because she argued that the people of her country couldn’t trust the Monocle class-not just the Eurocrats in Brussels, but also the global financial elite and PR gurus like her predecessor, David Cameron-who were too untethered to act in the best interests of the nation.
Monocle views the world as a single, utopian marketplace, linked by digital technology and first-class air travel, bestridden by compelling brands and their executives.
Every Monocle reader, regardless of where they live or work, should want the same things and seek them out wherever they go in the world, forming an identity made up not of places or people but of desirable products: German newspapers, Thai beach festivals, Norwegian television.
A recent article in The Guardian about Lisbon described the city as embracing “Monocle urbanism,” a shorthand for all that the magazine glorifies: plentiful local culture, a relaxed pace of life, modernized airports, and co-working spaces.
Who doesn’t like a good Japanese leather origami bag? But if nationalists have a point in decrying the “Global citizenship” that Monocle epitomizes, it lies in the magazine’s subtle approach to cultural homogenization.

The orginal article.

Summary of “All Models Are Wrong”

How is your journey towards understanding Farnam Street’s latticework of mental models going? Is it proving useful? Changing your view of the world? If the answer is that it’s going well that’s good.
Remember that all models are wrong; the practical question is how wrong do they have to be to not be useful.
It’s crucial for us to understand as many mental models as possible.
In the same way, our simplest mental models tend to be the most useful.
The same goes for mental models – they are always evolving, being revised – never really achieving perfection.
Many mental models are based upon scientific and mathematical concepts.
How long has this model been around? As a general rule, mental models which have been around for a long time will have been subjected to a great deal of scrutiny.
Mental models are a way of thinking about the world that prepares us to make good decisions in the first place.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Race Ipsa Loquitur”

It took me 2 years to run a “Regular” length Spartan Race, which happened to be the Spartan Race World Championships.
I spent the week leading up to the race in a walking boot, dodging anyone who might see me in it, only taking it off for the race, and hiding it in my luggage.
Podiums are meaningless if you spend the weeks leading up to a race an absolute miserable human being.
There will come a day when I’m no longer able to race, and if I destroy everything else in my life in the meantime to be singularly fixated on that goal, then what will I have left?
So in deciding to race again, I vowed to myself that this season and this year is a new challenge – different from any one I’ve tackled in the past.
I’m racing to see if I can race like I did in the early days of the sport – with passion, gratitude, and a perspective on things that really matter in life.
I finally put together WHY that is: because the longer the race gets, the more the race is about others.
If you are sending good vibes and well wishes to me before races, don’t tell me “Good luck” or “Kick ass” or “I hope you win,” – instead, please tell me to “Have fun.” And if you catch me after a race, give me a hug, hand me a beer, and tell me about your day.

The orginal article.