Summary of “20 Slang Terms From World War I”

One of the subtlest and most surprising legacies of the First World War-which the United States entered more than 100 years ago, when the country declared war on Germany on April 6, 1917-is its effect on our language.
Not all of these words and phrases have remained in use to this day, but here are 20 words and phrases that are rooted in First World War slang.
Booby-TrapBooby-trap had been in use since the mid-19th century to refer to a fairly harmless prank or practical joke when it was taken up by troops during the First World War to describe an explosive device deliberately disguised as a harmless object.
During the First World War the term came to be used as a nickname for shrapnel or shell-fire.13.
Shell-Shock Although the adjective shell-shocked has been traced back as far as 1898, the first true cases of shell-shock emerged during the First World War.
Spike-BozzledSpike was used during the First World War to mean “To render a gun unusable.” Spike-bozzled, or spike-boozled, came to mean “Completely destroyed,” and was usually used to describe airships and other aircraft rather than weaponry.
Strafe One of the German propagandists’ most famous World War I slogans was “Gott Strafe England!” or “God punish England,” which was printed everywhere in Germany from newspaper advertisements to postage stamps.
ZigzagZigzag has been used in English since the 18th century to describe an angular, meandering line or course but during the First World War came to be used as a euphemism for drunkenness, presumably referring to the zigzagging walk of a soldier who had had one too many.

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Summary of “The Most Important Skill for 21st-Century Students Is the Discipline to Say “No””

Can you code? Speak a second language? How high is your IQ? There’s much debate on what students need most to succeed in an increasingly competitive world.
The challenges of automation, globalization, and political upheaval leave out the fact that we’re living an age of information overload. According to CNN’s Fareed Zakaria, the one thing that children will need to learn is “Intellectual discipline.” The ability to recall facts and parrot popular arguments has become obsolete.
In a panel on “Education in the Post-Truth World” at WISE 2017’s summit for education, Zakaria contrasts how the barrage of media effect how young people take in and process information.
In other words, students need to return to the fundamentals of education where you question the information and the source, which allows you to gain a greater understanding.
The report concludes: “Overall, young people’s ability to reason about the information on the Internet can be summed up in one word: bleak.”
Our primary sources of information come from the internet and social media but this, in turn, becomes a minefield for sorting out fact from fiction.
We’re at an inflection point where paring down and drilling deep into information is going to be a necessity.
The future is always uncertain but what seems clear is that one of the most powerful tools anyone can harness is the single-minded pursuit of mastering how to seek the truth from information.

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Summary of “The Third Self”

Two hundred years before social media, the great French artist Eugène Delacroix lamented the necessary torment of avoiding social distractions in creative work; a century and a half later, Agnes Martin admonished aspiring artists to exercise discernment in the interruptions they allow, or else corrupt the mental, emotional, and spiritual privacy where inspiration arises.
Just as self-criticism is the most merciless kind of criticism and self-compassion the most elusive kind of compassion, self-distraction is the most hazardous kind of distraction, and the most difficult to protect creative work against.
Let all of them work, as ordinarily they do, in confident familiarity with whatever the work requires, and no more.
In creative work – creative work of all kinds – those who are the world’s working artists are not trying to help the world go around, but forward.
Part of this something-elseness, Oliver argues, is the uncommon integration of the creative self – the artist’s work cannot be separated from the artist’s whole life, nor can its wholeness be broken down into the mechanical bits-and-pieces of specific actions and habits.
Intellectual work sometimes, spiritual work certainly, artistic work always – these are forces that fall within its grasp, forces that must travel beyond the realm of the hour and the restraint of the habit.
The working, concentrating artist is an adult who refuses interruption from himself, who remains absorbed and energized in and by the work – who is thus responsible to the work Serious interruptions to work are never the inopportune, cheerful, even loving interruptions which come to us from another.
The most regretful people on earth are those who felt the call to creative work, who felt their own creative power restive and uprising, and gave to it neither power nor time.

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Summary of “How Two Words Can Change Your Life”

“Do not spoil what you have by desiring what you have not; remember that what you now have was once among the things you only hoped for.”
Why do we always desire what we don’t have? Desiring things you don’t have is not necessarily a bad thing.
If we didn’t desire unattainable stuff, the world probably wouldn’t advance one bit.
When I read about historical figures such as Christopher Columbus, the Wright Brothers, or Nikola Tesla, they used that desire for good things.
They didn’t complain and had an innate desire to achieve things.
Or you can go with a casual “Thanks.” You can say it to people, but more importantly, you can also say it to random things.
Appreciation is an important aspect of a happy life.
“Appreciation is a wonderful thing. It makes what is excellent in others belong to us as well.”

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Summary of “The Dream of Open Borders Is Real-in the High Arctic”

Svalbard is as close as you can get to a place with open borders: As long as you can support yourself, you can live there visa-free.2.
Among Svalbard’s most prominent personalities was an American businessman and coal entrepreneur named John Munro Longyear, who cofounded the Arctic Coal Company in 1906.
I had heard of Svalbard, but it never fully registered as a real place where people actually lived.
Evidence of Svalbard’s open border policy is subtle.
In January 2017 the Norwegian Coast Guard held a Latvian trawler, the Senator, in Svalbard’s port for setting out 2,600 crab traps.
Svalbard might appear to be a libertarian fantasy of open borders, self-sufficiency, and low taxes, but managing such a society requires a surprising amount of government.
Askholt did not criticize Svalbard’s diversity, but she did note, referring to a government white paper, that making sure Norwegians aren’t outnumbered here is a national priority.
In a place with open borders, crafting incentives is complex: If you make life on Svalbard appealing-with good schools or better housing-there’s no way to guarantee that it will be Norwegians who come.

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Summary of “5 Mindsets that Create Success”

Today, Chuck Close is an internationally-renowned painter and graphic artist whose work hangs on some of the most famous walls in the world.
Successful people don’t sit around and wait for their muse to come and inspire them to change the world.
Dalio’s company, Bridgewater Associates, is one of the world’s largest hedge funds and has consistently beat the market in good times and bad for decades now.
“Being a model means being a benchmark, someone whose beliefs are worthy of being imitated, and I grew tired of being a model of superficiality. I grew tired of a world of lies, appearances, falsity, hypocrisy, and deception, a society full of anti-values that exalts violence, adultery, drugs, alcohol, fighting, and a world that exalts riches, pleasure, sexual immorality and fraud. I want to be a model that promotes the true dignity of women instead of being used for commercial purposes.”
“The world doesn’t appeal to me. I enjoy every moment God gives me.”
My new book, Everything Is F*cked: A Book about Hope, is a deep dive into how we find hope and meaning in the world-and how finding hope and meaning in the world can really fuck us if we’re not careful.
In almost every material aspect, the world is a better place than it ever has been.
Amada Rosa Pérez showed us that we can define success in a way that lifts others up, gives us a little peace, and maybe leaves the world a little less fucked than it was when we showed up.

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Summary of “Potosí: the mountain of silver that was the first global city”

Even in the Andes of South America there were other silver cities besides Potosí, including Oruro and Castrovirreyna in Peru.
A new design debuted to signal the new coins, but winning back global trust in Potosí silver took decades.
Almost a century before Don Elias visited Potosí, Viceroy Francisco de Toledo revolutionised world silver production.
A steady flow of Potosí silver – or, rather, the promise of silver futures – rendered the Spanish Habsburgs’ otherwise absurd dreams possible.
Even before the mint fraud of the 1640s, which helped bankrupt the crown, large quantities of Potosí silver slipped away, siphoned off by the empire’s friends and enemies alike: foreign bankers, contraband traders, pirates.
In the 17th century, these ‘country traders’, as Europeans called them, moved and lent more Potosí silver than all Europeans combined.
Just as the Spanish Habsburgs began squaring off against the French and English, the ‘gunpowder’ monarchs of the Middle East and South Asia scooped up satellite kingdoms and principalities, propelled to a degree by Potosí silver.
Potosí was a mountain of silver that changed the world even as the world changed it.

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Summary of “2020 Olympics: Preview, athletes and storylines to watch”

Great Britain’s Mo Farah capped the “Double double” in Rio and became the first runner to win the 5,000 meters and 10,000 meters at consecutive Olympics since Finland’s Lasse Viren at the 1972 Munich and 1976 Montreal Olympics.
In order to compete at the 2020 Olympics, an athlete will need to finish within the top three of their respective events at the trials and meet the Olympic standards set by the IAAF. STORYLINES TO WATCH. The next generation is here.
The International Gymnastics Federation voted to confirm a proposal in 2015 to change the size of Olympic gymnastics teams from five athletes to four, and the change will be enacted for the first time in Tokyo 2020.
This will be the first Olympics since the Nassar scandal; the first Olympics since these athletes bravely spoke out and began advocating for a more empowering culture.
How will Euro 2020 and the 2020 Copa América-the fourth Copa América in six years!-influence roster decisions and fan interest in the Olympics? Both marquee tournaments will end on July 12, just 11 days before the start of the men’s Olympic tournament.
If the 2020 Olympics were held today, every star-from Serena Williams to Roger Federer to Rafa Nadal-would happily be playing in the singles draw.
The Olympics are held in such high esteem that multiple stars still currently playing deep and into their 30s are using the motivation of Tokyo 2020 as a potential career finish line.
So a crucial event to watch out for in the run-up to 2020 is the Japan Cup, which begins August 30, and should be the last opportunity to see Team USA face Japan before the Olympics.

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Summary of “Story time: the five children’s books every adult should read”

My adult self wants all those things, and also: acknowledgments of fear, love, failure.
When you read a children’s book, you are given the space to read again as a child: to find your way back, back to the time when new discoveries came daily and when the world was colossal, before your imagination was trimmed and neatened, as if it were an optional extra.
For that we need books that are specifically written to give the heart and mind a galvanic kick – children’s books.
The books say: look, this is what bravery looks like.
WH Auden wrote, in an essay on Lewis Carroll: “There are good books which are only for adults, because their comprehension presupposes adult experiences, but there are no good books which are only for children.” I would not suggest that adults read only, or even primarily, children’s fiction.
The harpies make a bargain: if each soul has paid heed to the world and has a story to tell of it, and they tell it truly, they will be led through the darkness to the other side.
We must learn to tell stories, his books say, whether it comes naturally or not – because it is the best and sometimes the only way we have to exchange truth.
In One Dog and His Boy, Hal, a child with everything he could wish for except love and care, releases five dogs from the cruel Easy Pets agency.

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Summary of “Odell Beckham Jr. on Being Traded by the Giants, The Catch, and His Signature Hair”

Are you happier now, or were you happier then?I always say this: I wouldn’t change anything for the world for where I’m at now.
I also always say this: Be careful what you ask for and be careful what you speak.
Why?I didn’t know that getting to that level-or being on the level, like, where a LeBron is at-that I would have to deal with certain things.
Like, I really didn’t know that when I was younger.
People ask me what advice I would give, and I’m just like: Be careful what you ask for.
So let me ask you again: Are you happier now, or were you happier then?At this moment? I’m happier than I’ve ever been.
Honestly, the whole reason I play football is, one, for my momma.
I was a kid playing in the Georgia Dome at halftime for 15 plays, and I was there to watch Mike Vick.

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