Summary of “A Brief Timeline of George R.R. Martin Focusing on ‘The Winds of Winter'”

So in honor of Martin’s epic procrastinating, here’s a timeline of The Winds of Winter’s many postponements, and other assorted non-Winds of Winter ventures.
July 2011: “I’ve Repeatedly Been Guilty of an Excess of Optimism” In an interview with Entertainment Weekly published in July, Martin says that he’d get back to writing The Winds of Winter at the start of 2012 once the publicity cycle for A Dance With Dragons winds down.
October 2012: Martin Admits He Sucks at Making Predictions Martin has an interview with Adria’s News, which, to the best of my knowledge, is a Spanish blog.
The good news is Martin plans to use this time to wrap up the rest of The Winds of Winter.
“Here’s the update. You won’t like it.” Martin concedes that The Winds of Winter is not finished, and that by the time Thrones’ sixth season airs in April, it still won’t be completed.
January 2017: OK, for Real This Time, 2017 Is the Year A fan asks Martin on his blog for a Winds of Winter update, and while Martin’s a bit peeved to be asked about it again, he offers a glimmer of hope: “I think it will be out this year.”
April 2018: Yeah, It’s the Targaryen Book Martin confirms that the first volume of his Targaryen tome, Fire and Blood, is coming before The Winds of Winter and will be published in November 2018.
Martin has obviously anticipated more reader backlash-because, you know, The Winds of Winter isn’t finished years after he was optimistic he was getting very close-so he writes in the comments about all the famous authors who were never able to finish some of their books, for, uh, “The sake of argument.” “Many many people invest their time into works without endings. F. Scott Fitzgerald never finished The Last Tycoon, Charles Dickens never finished Edwin Drood, Mervyn Peake never finished Titus Alone, yet those works are still read.”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How George Orwell Predicted the Challenge of Writing Today”

Orwell was writing in 1946, five or seven years before scholarly works by Hannah Arendt, on the one hand, and Karl Friedrich, on the other, provided the definitions of totalitarianism that are still in use today.
In “Nineteen Eighty-Four,” Orwell predicted this negotiation, and named it doublethink.
Orwell notes that “Literature has sometimes flourished under despotic regimes.” It is having to cater to the instability imposed by totalitarianism-having to constantly adjust one’s world view-that is murderous to the writer, or at least to the writing.
One might reasonably suspect that censorship and fear were to blame, that better writing existed but had to be hidden.
Orwell suggests one more way in which totalitarianism kills writing.
Find a way to describe happiness as a public good, and the current pervasive crisis of mental health in a way that doesn’t involve the frames of norms and pathology, or the language of “Fixing” people.
Above all, find a way to describe a world in which the way things are is not the way things have always been and will always be, in which imagination is not only operant but prized and nurtured.
If one insists on writing the truth of those hopes-or, rather, if many writers do this-the result may not be great literature, which is always a miracle, but it will exercise the imagination.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Six Books We Could and Should All Write”

The spirit in which he wrote was like he was a mad bibliographer with a vast collection of rare and oddball books of no use to anybody but him, but which he was cataloguing just for the pleasure of having all that information in one place.
Just to refresh: I’m saying one should compose a book about oneself, a book about others, an anthology of favorites, a book about words, and now I’m adding a book of lists.
The Pillow Book is not all lists, but it’s the lists that always make the biggest impression.
Again, your book of lists won’t be as good as hers.
It can never be repeated too often: These books I’m telling you to write are not for the world.
Have you given any thought to 120 Days of Sodom lately? My philosophy professor at Penn State told us that Sade’s idea was to write a book one glance into which would entail eternal damnation for the reader.
I keep saying I want us all to write these books with no thought for publication, not even posthumous, but here, the goal would be to write a book that you dare not publish.
So there are the six books we should all write, and only the last is an idea book.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Gretchen Rubin”

We first got to know each other through our related subjects – I love her work on understanding how we use time, and how to get more happiness from our time.
Reading her work always reminds me of one of my most important Secrets of Adulthood: I have plenty of time for the things that are important to me.
Despite making my living as a writer, I’m continually amazed how many other professional obligations can get in the way of writing! Doing my 500 words a day helps me feel more creative.
There are 168 hours in a week, so it turns out it is quite possible to work full-time, spend plenty of time with loved ones, and get enough sleep as well.
Who else would set a goal – in January – to write 500 words a day? I’m pretty sure the Upholder tribe includes anyone who writes about productivity and habits.
As we think about time, it’s important to remember that the “Self” is really three selves: the anticipating self, the experiencing self, and the remembering self.
The anticipating self thought it would be fun to go to the art museum on Friday night, when there’s live music and a bar, and the remembering self will look back fondly on the experience, but the experiencing self just got home from work.
In most cases, if your anticipating self wanted to do it, you’ll be happy you went, and probably the experiencing self will enjoy it too once she gets over the initial resistance.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie Comes to Terms with Global Fame”

Around the time that Imasuen was getting yelled at by his mother, the author of “Purple Hibiscus,” Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, who is now regarded as one of the most vital and original novelists of her generation, was living in a poky apartment in Baltimore, writing the last sections of her second book.
Sitting in Baltimore, Chimamanda found that writing her Biafra novel was arousing in her a degree of obsessiveness that she had not experienced before.
To write the last part of the book, when the war was going very badly for Biafra, she didn’t want to be in Nigeria at all: she needed distance.
In 2007, a guy he knew, who had written a Kafkaesque novel about a Nigerian who wakes up white, told him that Chimamanda was holding a writing workshop that September, in Lagos.
Chimamanda had thought that one thing she could do with the success of “Half of a Yellow Sun” was bring together would-be writers and show them that they had skill enough to make a go of it.
She could never live somewhere like New York, where you were tripping over writers every time you turned around, writers in restaurants, writers in the supermarket, writers on the subway.
A young Yoruba writer, under the gravitational pull of “Purple Hibiscus” and “Half of a Yellow Sun,” had made her characters Igbo for years, in the way that Chimamanda, having read only English books as a child, had made her first characters apple-eating and white.
She had instantly recognized herself in the Ojiugo character in “Americanah,” and complained to Chimamanda that if she was going to write about her could she next time just use her name and make it official?

The orginal article.

Summary of “The therapeutic benefits of keeping a journal-and throwing it away after you’re done”

After hearing a Dutch politician on the radio say he planned to collect individuals’ accounts of Germany’s occupation of the Netherlands during the war, she revised and edited her personal journal.
Journals aren’t written for mass consumption; they are therapeutic.
Filling journals is a healthy exercise that puts us in touch with our emotions and allows us to freely express ourselves.
Keeping a diary helped Mycoskie deal with his fear of failure when he needed to seem confident to others.
Like Susan Borkin, author of The Healing Power of Writing: A Therapist’s Guide to Using Journaling With Clients, even encourage clients to journal to improve their ability to express themselves during sessions.
Keeping a personal record helps people to alleviate their anxiety, face fears, set goals, and feel more free.
Learning to recognize the fleeting nature of our thoughts leads meditators and diary writers alike to the inevitable conclusion that not everything they think is important or permanent, nor do their fears and anxieties have to come true.
Writing worries away has been proven to boost exam performance, for example.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Zadie Smith Remembers Philip Roth”

One time, I was having a conversation with Philip Roth about lane swimming, a thing it turned out we both liked to do, although he could swim much farther and much faster.
Roth in the swimming pool was no different than Roth at his standing desk.
At an unusually tender age, he learned not to write to make people think well of him, nor to display to others, through fiction, the right sort of ideas, so they could think him the right sort of person.
Roth always told the truth-his own, subjective truth-through language and through lies, the twin engines at the embarrassing heart of literature.
Like all writers, there were things and ideas that lay beyond his ken or conception; he had blind spots, prejudices, selves he could imagine only partially, or selves he mistook or mislaid.
Unlike many writers, he did not aspire to perfect vision.
Roth used every little scrap of what he had. Nothing was held back or protected from writing, nothing saved for a rainy day.
Roth was an unusually patriotic writer, but his love for his country never outweighed or obscured his curiosity about it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Marti Noxon Wants to Put Angry Women on TV”

On a soundstage in Queens, New York, the crew for Marti Noxon’s new TV series Dietland has built an extremely realistic replica of the offices of a modern women’s magazine.
At 53, Noxon has written, produced, and directed TV shows and films for more than two decades, but it’s only now, right now, that the stories she’s really interested in are stories that Hollywood wants to tell.
Joss Whedon, the creator of the cult hit Buffy the Vampire Slayer-which Noxon worked on as a writer and producer for six seasons, until the series’ finale in 2003-dubbed her the “Chains-and-pain gal.” Gillian Flynn, who wrote the novel Sharp Objects, describes Noxon as an “Amazing force wrapped in this kind of calm, pleasant package, but also, don’t fuck with her.”
If a singular thread runs through Noxon’s work, it’s the assertion that women can be just as complex as men-that they can make catastrophic decisions, put themselves in danger, damage others, and damage themselves.
Buffy’s own struggles preceded the darker stories about women that have emerged in recent years, in shows including Jessica Jones, Fleabag, Insecure, Big Little Lies, Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, and UnREAL-an Emmy-nominated series, co-created by Noxon, that makes its own meta-commentary on the portrayal of women in entertainment.
Until Noxon left Buffy, a show she describes as “This little enclave of feminist thought and respect for female voices,” she didn’t fully realize how male-dominated the TV industry was.
Noxon is on the fence about how much women in Hollywood should expect from this particular moment, though.
As soon as Noxon proposed making Sharp Objects into a TV show, “It was like the shackles on the storytelling fell off.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is your kid grumpy, stubborn or defiant? This might be the reason”

One mother’s investigation into why her child was acting so stubborn led to a surprising discovery: He was discouraged.
The root of an at-times defiant, difficult child: discouragementRudolf Dreikurs, a 20th century psychologist who focused much of his work on parenting, observed that, “A misbehaving child is a discouraged child.”
Sometimes a child who is misbehaving frequently is struggling with discouragement, 20th century psychologist Rudolf Dreikurs found.
After struggling to understand why her very smart child refused to do his homework, one mom finally asks the right question.
This is one of the hardest places to pull a kid out of because the child’s behavior makes adults feel the same emotions that the child is feeling: hopeless, helpless, and inadequate.
These uncomfortable emotions are frequently masked by the child with defiance and lack of motivation.
Tips for encouraging your child, combating defiant behaviorPulling our child out of this hole takes creativity and patience.
Break a task down into small steps and ask your child to just do one step at a time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Profile: Maira Kalman, Author and Illustrator”

Not all her fans think of Maira Kalman primarily as a writer, but that’s how she described herself to me when we met last month.
My excuse for writing about Kalman is the reissue of several stories for children that she published in the 1990s, starring a dog called Max.
In those texts, her other work for children, and her work for adults, Kalman is the remix artist she describes above, one for whom image and word are intertwined and of equal importance.
In her work for adults, Kalman is almost a diarist, which breeds a certain deceptive sense of familiarity.
The bare bones of her life, gleaned from our conversation and her books: Kalman was born in Israel, in 1949, and her family relocated to the States when she was still a toddler.
In Thomas Jefferson: Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Everything, a children’s biography of the statesman, Kalman writes candidly about the man.
The book succeeds because Kalman is so forthright, the rare adult willing to admit to kids that scary things happen.
In My Favorite Things, Kalman writes, “The artist Charlotte Salomon lived in this room in Berlin in the 1930s. She painted and wrote about her family in a book called ‘Opera or Life.’ People were always coming and going and dying. She was killed in the Holocaust. Which brings us inevitably to sorrow.”

The orginal article.