Summary of “Tim Goodman: The Post-Review, Post-Premiere, Post-Finale World of Peak TV”

Pretty much any TV critic can tell you how that went.
The allure of catching up – and all TV critics are behind and scrambling to catch up – is too much.
Most of those revolve around Peak TV and the staggering increase in the number of scripted series, but also the surge of available outlets, the ways television is consumed – when and on what device – and the overall effect this all has on the consumer and the industry at large.
In the last two years, television critics have definitively realized they can’t watch everything and there’s nobody left even willing to lie about it.
If the critic’s conundrum was adjusting to a world where it was frustratingly impossible to watch every thing after being able to do just that several seasons prior, for the average viewer it was an overwhelming sense of, well, being overwhelmed.
I’m still fascinated by what Peak TV means to the creators and writers who actually make it – this weird combination of increased opportunity, increased paychecks, decreased awareness from the public that you actually made something combined with increased awareness of a frightening new world where some platforms that paid you to make it don’t seem entirely keen on promoting it when you’re finished, or making it easy to find once they put it out into the ether.
Think about what TV has given – or, if you prefer, done to – the average viewer.
I had already expressed a desire to write less about so many premieres and more about the endings of shows, since one of the scourges of the TV critic game is that we’re compelled to write about the start of new and returning series, yet have almost no capacity to see them all through to the end.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What “Pivoting to Video” Really Means”

On Wednesday, MTV announced it was trashing MTV News’ hub of political and cultural reporting and “Shifting resources into short-form video content more in line with young people’s media consumption habits.” In the midst of the biggest political story of its readers’ young lives, MTV was going No Labels.
To create “Premium video across all platforms.” Writers like Bruce Feldman would have to take their words and podcasts elsewhere.
Less than two weeks before that, Vocativ got rid of roughly 20 staffers, including Tomás Ríos and Robert Silverman, as part of what the company called a “Strategic shift to focus exclusively on video content.” Mindful of buzzwords, the company left open the possibility that some videos might be “Longform.”
It’s one thing to think of a video replacing a writer in theory.
Any of us who attempt to write about the “Pivot to video” do so from inside the same new-media vortex that swallowed our comrades.
As Select/All’s Brian Feldman pointed out, “Pivoting to video” is just another way to say “Layoff.” “It’s curious that a pivot into video involves firing everyone in the video department,” a former MTVer told Billboard.
The pivot to video feels both grislier and more soulless, like the fourth movie in a Blumhouse franchise.
Finally, the pivot to video stokes a longstanding existential fear among print journalists: What if writing is now the most important, but third-most-lucrative thing you can do for your media company? What if writing, full stop, isn’t a job anymore?

The orginal article.

Summary of “MTV News: The Good, the Bad, and the Contradictions of an Ill-Fated Experiment”

The goal of the new era of MTV, he told the Huffington Post, would be to deliver “Really smart criticism of the culture through a music lens.” That MTV News.
The dissolution of this micro-era of MTV News in just over a year and a half leaves us with several questions: Can a behemoth media company like MTV succeed in reinventing itself from within simply by creating a “Prestige journalism” arm? Further, what kind of journalism does a company like Viacom-which is largely reliant on friendly artist relationships for its financial success-support and allow? And what even was the intended outcome? Fierman and Hopper both came to MTV News from publications-Grantland and Pitchfork’s longform print magazine, respectively-that had not been economically viable from the perspectives of various suits.
When the story was featured on MTV’s Snapchat Discover channel, it caught the eye of Chance’s management, who subsequently contacted MTV and allegedly said that, as a result, he “Was never working with MTV again.”
On July 5, 2016, Hopper told the staff that MTV was attempting to book DJ Khaled for various unknown projects, telling the staff that they might have to “Nix” any writing on the producer “Unless it’s like, KHALED IS GREAT.” Elsewhere, interference from artist reps was so pervasive that some MTV News editors spent part of this past New Year’s Eve haggling line-by-line with a chart-topping, platinum-selling, Grammy-winning female pop star’s publicist over a post in which MTV’s editors eventually agreed to cut one sentence.
Earlier in the decade, an endeavor called MTV Hive was tasked with bringing in-depth, longform journalism to MTV, but it was never fully integrated into the company, and was eventually left to wither.
“There’s big opportunity for MTV and MTV News-especially on digital platforms,” Herzog told The Hollywood Reporter.
In the context of MTV, too, this MTV News experiment met a routine and familiar death.
There is one outlier that provides an interesting parallel to MTV News: Bill Simmons’ The Ringer, which, like MTV News, absorbed a sizable portion of Grantland’s staff.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Essay: Cultural Appropriation Is Indefensible”

Last week, the New York Times published an op-ed titled “In Defense of Cultural Appropriation” in which writer Kenan Malik attempted to extol the virtues of artistic appropriation and chastise those who would stand in the way of necessary “Cultural engagement.” What would have happened, he argues, had Elvis Presley not been able to swipe the sounds of black musicians?
Malik is not the first person to defend cultural appropriation.
The truth is that cultural appropriation is indefensible.
The issue here is that Niedzviecki conflated cultural appropriation and the practice of writing characters with very different identities from yourself – and they’re not the same thing.
Cultural appropriation can feel hard to get a handle on, because boiling it down to a two-sentence dictionary definition does no one any favors.
You will find many who say: Don’t write characters from minority or marginalized identities if you are not going to put in the hard work to do it well and avoid cultural appropriation and other harmful outcomes.
All of this lies at the root of why cultural appropriation is indefensible.
Cultural appropriation does damage, and it should be something writers and other artists work hard to avoid, not compete with each other to achieve.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Keeping a Daily Journal Could Change Your Life”

You acquire one of these habits and everything in your life can change.
Journal Every Day”Keeping a personal journal a daily in-depth analysis and evaluation of your experiences is a high-leverage activity that increases self-awareness and enhances all the endowments and the synergy among them.” - Stephen R.Covey.
Journaling Accelerates Your Ability To Manifest Your GoalsAs part of your morning creative burst, use your journal to review and hone your daily to-do list.
Journaling Generates Clarity And CongruenceThis keystone habit has so much power! By journaling in the morning and evening, you’ll quickly see the incongruencies in your life.
Journaling Clears Your EmotionsSeveral research studies have found that writing in your journal reduces stress.
Journaling Increases Your GratitudeEven if you start a journal session in a bad mood, the insight writing brings has a subtle way of shifting your mind towards gratitude.
You’ll be captivated not only by the amazing things in your life, but by the awe and brilliance of life in general.
Journaling Records Your Life HistoryI started journaling in 2008 after reading an article about the importance of journal writing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Life-Changing Habit of Journaling (Einstein, Leonardo da Vinci, and Many More Great Minds”

Ever wondered why history’s great minds including Isaac Newton, Abraham Lincoln, Andy Warhol, Leonardo Da Vinci, Marcus Aurelius, Charles Darwin, Winston Churchill, Benjamin Franklin, Ernest Hemingway, George Bernard Shaw and Maya Angelou would spend so much of their precious time writing things that will never be seen by another soul?
Judy Willis MD, a neurologist, and former classroom teacher explains, “The practice of writing can enhance the brain’s intake, processing, retaining, and retrieving of information it promotes the brain’s attentive focus boosts long-term memory, illuminates patterns, gives the brain time for reflection, and when well-guided, is a source of conceptual development and stimulus of the brain’s highest cognition.”
You don’t have to spend your whole morning writing, but the only rule is to write continuously.
As part of your morning and post-work journaling sessions, be sure to write about everything you are grateful for.
“Writing in a journal each day, with a structured, strategic process allows you to direct your focus to what you did accomplish, what you’re grateful for, and what you’re committed to doing better tomorrow. Thus, you more deeply enjoy your journey each day, feel good about any forward progress you made, and use a heightened level of clarity to accelerate your results,” says Hal Elrod, author of “The Miracle Morning”.
“Writing accesses you’re the left hemisphere of the brain, which is analytical and rational,” says Maud Purcell, a psychotherapist and journaling expert.
“While your left brain is occupied, your right brain is free to do what it does best, i.e. create, intuit and feel. In this way, writing removes mental blocks and allows us to use more of our brainpower to better understand ourselves and the world around us.”
Journaling is not a commonplace habit, it is a keystone habit.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5-minute morning routines that can make your whole day better”

Plenty of the habits that can help you start your day take five minutes or less.
We found a bunch of those habits on the Quora threads, “What can I do in 5 minutes in the morning to make my whole day better?” and “How can I improve my morning routine?”.
Below, check out some of the simplest routines to start your day feeling refreshed and ready to tackle whatever challenges come your way.
Journalist Charles Duhigg writes in his book “The Power of Habit” that making your bed can help increase your productivity for the rest of the day.
Chris Remus recommends using the “Five Minute Journal,” which is a specific journal that comes with inspirational quotes and thought-provoking questions: “You’ll feel more positive and happier when you use it. Your whole day will be better as a result.”
In his second book, “Smarter Faster Better,” Duhigg outlines a similar technique: Tell yourself stories about how the day will unfold.
He recommends making a habit of this strategy by spending your morning commute telling yourself a detailed story about the rest of the day.
As Julie Morgenstern, author of the book “Never Check Email in the Morning,” told The Huffington Post, if you start your morning by checking your email, “You’ll never recover.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “What does it mean for a journalist today to be a Serious Reader?”

Love of reading was, if not innate, second nature: his mother, a linguistics professor; father, an English professor; brother, an art critic; and four sisters, all Ph.Ds. The labor of writing, as he’s put it, “Is, if not uniquely hard work, then uniquely draining.” Reading afterward is emotionally and intellectually replenishing.
Journalists would seem to have a professional responsibility, maybe even a public duty, to self-educate with greater strategy and intensity-to be Serious Readers.
My reporting was bound to overlook brilliant, worthy readers, but to help identify which journalists exemplify lifestyles of Serious Reading, it was useful to follow chains of admiration.
As he once explained, “I spend half my day writing about television, and the other half writing about books, and I read instead of sleep.” One way or another, Serious Readers must overcome a basic problem: There are only so many hours in a day.
There may not be an entrance exam for journalists, but is there a threshold of reading necessary to earn credibility covering a topic-some quantity of books read, or some familiarity with seminal works? On a basic level, sure, but that also misses the lesson of Traister’s childhood.
Her work reading aligns almost perfectly with what she’d read for pleasure.
As a teen, Christopher Hitchens was a voracious but directionless reader, later recalling, “I was too brittle to decide among so many possible treats.” If only he had a Serious Reading Pyramid, right?
“To be a good reader, paradoxically, doesn’t mean being a discriminating reader, it means being an omnivorous reader,” he explains.

The orginal article.

Summary of “deadspin-quote-carrot-aligned-w-bgr-2”

As screenwriter Craig Mazin says, “The most exciting script in the world is the one you’re about to write. The least exciting script is the one you’re on page 80 of.” So that idea debt metastasizes, threatening to hold up the real projects, or halt them so long that they too become idea debt.
Do you have a lot of ideas but no clue how to organize them? Or maybe ideas come to you and by the.
In his 2006 video Brain Crack, Ze Frank imagined his unused ideas “On a beautiful platter with glitter and rose petals.” To avoid getting addicted to his brain crack, Frank said, “When I get an idea, even a bad one, I try to get it out into the world as fast as possible.”
The problem solves itself, he tells me: “I have often times come up with an idea that’s a lot of work, and then I have T-Rex describe the idea in a comic as a way to scratch that itch.”
One upside of idea debt’s perverse appeal is that the idea can seem so good, so worthy, that you just want someone to make it happen, whether or not that someone is you.
Novelist Neil Gaiman says people come up to every author with the same offer: “They’ll tell you the Idea, you write it down and turn it into a novel, the two of you can split the money fifty-fifty.” Business ideas are similarly unsellable.
As investor Tim Berry says, “The way real people with real ideas get value from them is by building a company to implement those ideas.” Unless the Patent Office will let you register it, it’s worthless.
They’re fun ideas: A puzzle game based on DNA editing; a simulation of Lenin’s final days; a cow-clicker game about blogging; a Qbert MMO. “Ideas are cheap,” Beschizza wrote.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Different languages: How cultures around the world draw shapes differently”

Did you start at the top or bottom? Clockwise or counterclockwise? New data show that the way you draw a circle holds clues about where you come from.
In November, Google released an online game called Quick, Draw!, in which users have 20 seconds to draw prompts like “Camel” and “Washing machine.” It’s fun, but the game’s real aim is to use those sketches to teach algorithms how humans draw.
We used the public database from Quick, Draw! to compare how people draw basic shapes around the world.
No matter where you begin, there are really only two ways to draw a circle, a single stroke heading clockwise, or a single stroke heading counterclockwise.
Most of the world, it seems, draws circles counterclockwise, with just two exceptions from our dataset: Taiwan and Japan.
English has a stroke order, too, though it’s far less rigid: Perhaps it’s writing counterclockwise “c” and “g” over and over as kids that has most of the Latin-alphabet world drawing circles that way.
X X X. To help researchers figure out if a child was right or left-handed, the child would be told to draw circles around each X, then again with the other hand.
A 1973 cross-cultural study looked at how US and Israeli children copied shapes at different ages and found, too, that American children overwhelmingly drew circles counterclockwise.

The orginal article.