Summary of “How Stephen King’s Wife Saved “Carrie” and Launched His Career”

King couldn’t even afford his own typewriter; he had to use Tabby’s Olivetti from college.
Each evening, while Tabby changed diapers and cooked dinner, King ignored the ungraded papers in his briefcase and locked himself in the laundry room to write.
There’s a running joke at the King dinner table that Stephen married Tabby only because she had a typewriter.
King modeled Carrie White after two of the loneliest girls he remembered from high school.
“Very rarely in my career have I explored more distasteful territory,” King wrote, reflecting on how both of them were treated.
“Stephen King, are you there? Stephen King?” King reached for the intercom and said he was there.
King quit teaching and Tabby stopped peddling pastries.
Three years later, King bought Tabby another present.

The orginal article.

Summary of “25 Movies and the Magazine Stories That Inspired Them”

As more publications pursue blockbuster stories with film and television potential, producers in Hollywood and the magazine industry are taking their inspiration from successful article-to-film adaptations of the past that have achieved box office success.
Here are 25 gold-standard film adaptations of magazine articles, published over the course of half a century as cover stories, features, or breaking news, as well as direct links to read all 25 stories online.
Many of these writers’ names will be familiar to readers, as will the majority of the magazines and films themselves, in many cases because celebrated journalists inspired these major motion pictures at the peak of their careers as writers and reporters.
These stories belong on any narrative nonfiction syllabus on their own merit, but I hope these samples are still just the beginning, and that new filmmakers and magazine writers can start to work together far more often on a greater breadth of material, with sufficient editorial guidance and studio backing to support them.
The list of new film and television adaptations based on popular books or podcasts, let alone reporting that has helped support the explosion in streaming documentary formats, would run even longer.
It takes time, access, imagination, and resources to be able to realize ambitious true stories like these in their original form as narrative magazine features.
Writers are the lifeblood of all of these industries, and will always play a pivotal role in any production that is based on a true story.
He even inserted fake mistakes into his fake stories so fact checkers would catch them and feel as if they were doing their jobs.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The emoji is the modern hieroglyph”

Thousands of years after the Egyptians wrote the first hieroglyphic scripts, the spread of emoji seems to be bringing us back to a picture-based writing system.
Because both hieroglyphs and emoji are far more powerful than they appear.
The hieroglyph for a mouth, for example, did not simply mean “Mouth”; it also meant “Towards”, a different word that was pronounced the same way.
Sending a heart emoji, a shrug or an eye-roll is different from writing text.
Emoji are useful in part because they enact emotions, rather than stating them.
Surveys show many people find it easier to communicate feelings with emoji than words.
Demand for emoji means more software is becoming Unicode compatible, allowing users to access not just new emoji but unusual alphabets such as Cherokee that are released alongside them.
Our use of emoji today may end up having a similar effect.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Proving Precognition, Programming a Screenwriter, and Other Tales From the Field”

During one type of event, you stare at a list of digits for an hour, then over the next two hours, you write down every one you can recall, in order.
You might start out with only a few familiar sites, but you can gather more.
Jim Patterson, Director of Assessment Design and Development at the College Board When I was an English teacher, I got familiar with standardized tests, and in the mid-’90s, I joined the industry and started writing questions.
Actual humans have to write these questions, but most people can’t believe it.
Oscar Sharp, Director; Ross Goodwin, Technologist When director Oscar Sharp entered Sci-Fi-London’s 48 Hours Film Challenge in 2016, he had to write, shoot, and edit a movie in two days.
Learning To train a neural network that writes text one letter at a time, Goodwin fed it nearly 1,000 sci-fi scripts, including The X-Files and Blade Runner.
Writing Benjamin churned out a jabberwocky of a script.
Walking and talking For Sharp’s next project, Goodwin trained Benjamin to write like screenwriter Aaron Sorkin.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Margery Kempe Had 14 Children and She Still Invented the Memoir”

The Book of Margery Kempe is mostly the kind of text you read if you’re a medievalist, or maybe an English major at a women’s college, although I was an English major at a women’s college and I didn’t read it until I was in graduate school.
In one of my favorite passages of The Book, Christ tells Margery that she should “Make every Christian man and women your child in your souland have as much grace for them as you have for your own children.” In a spiritual economy in which women could either be spiritual mothers or physical mothers, this vision of Christ suggesting that it is precisely Margery’s physical maternity that makes her a great spiritual intercessor is nothing short of radical.
It is important to note that The Book of Margery Kempe is a book written by a mother but it is not a book about being a mother.
It mostly ignores the years Margery spent birthing and raising her children.
The Book of Margery Kempe is a book written by a mother but it is not a book about being a mother.
The woman’s husband tells Margery that his wife “Roars and cries so that she makes folk terribly afraid.” They have put manacles on her wrists, he says, because she “Will both smite and bite.” But when Margery enters the house, the woman speaks to her calmly.
Writing about this episode, scholar Lynn Staley notes that in helping the postpartum woman, Margery “Seems to offer consolation to her former self.” It is not hard to imagine why Margery might have been popular among married and childbearing women.
By Ellmann’s standards, Margery Kempe certainly had too many children.

The orginal article.

Summary of “”Minor Feelings” and the Possibilities of Asian-American Identity”

Early in the formidable new essay collection “Minor Feelings: An Asian American Reckoning,” the poet Cathy Park Hong delivers a fatalistic state-of-the-race survey.
“In the popular imagination,” she writes, “Asian Americans inhabit a vague purgatorial status … distrusted by African Americans, ignored by whites, unless we’re being used by whites to keep the black man down.” Asians, she observes, are perceived to be emotionless functionaries, and yet she is always “Frantically paddling my feet underwater, always overcompensating to hide my devouring feelings of inadequacy.” Not enough has been said, Hong thinks, about the self-hatred that Asian-Americans experience.
“Minor Feelings” consists of seven essays; Hong explains the book’s title in an essay called “Stand Up” that centers on Richard Pryor’s “Live in Concert.” Minor feelings are “The racialized range of emotions that are negative, dysphoric, and therefore untelegenic.” One such minor feeling: the deadening sensation of seeing an Asian face on a movie screen and bracing for the ching-chong joke.
“If the indebted Asian immigrant thinks they owe their life to America, the child thinks they owe their livelihood to their parents for their suffering,” Hong writes.
“The indebted Asian American is therefore the ideal neoliberal subject.” She becomes a “Dog cone of shame,” a “Urinal cake of shame.” Hong’s metaphors are crafted with stinging care.
For a long time, Hong recounts in the book’s first essay, she did not want to write about her Asian identity.
Today, “Asian-American” mainly signifies people with East Asian ancestry: most Americans, Hong writes, think “Chinese is synecdoche for Asians the way Kleenex is for tissues.” The term, for many people-and for Hollywood-seems to conjure upper-middle-class images: doctors, bankers.
In his book “The Latinos of Asia,” the sociologist Anthony Christian Ocampo argues that Filipinos tend to manifest a sort of ethnic flexibility, feeling more at home, compared with members of other Asian ethnic groups, with whites, African-Americans, Latinos, and other Asians.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A dirty secret: you can only be a writer if you can afford it”

Let’s start with me: I’m not sure how or if I’d still be a writer without the help of other people’s money.
I did not know what this writer, who I thought was single, paid in rent, or all the other ways that they might have been able to cut corners, that I, a mother of two, could not cut, but even then, it felt impossible to me that this writer was sustaining themselves in any legitimate way without some outside help.
I don’t know this writer and don’t know how, actually, they lived.
What I do know is, when the panel was over, I wanted to take the microphone back and say loudly to the students that what this writer said was, at least in part, a lie.
According to a 2018 Author’s Guild Study the median income of all published authors for all writing related activity was $6,080 in 2017, down from $10,500 in 2009; while the median income for all published authors based solely on book-related activities went from $3,900 to $3,100, down 21%. Roughly 25% of authors earned $0 in income in 2017.
The median income of all published authors for all writing related activity was $6,080 in 2017.
There is the feeling that the choices that we’ve made outside of writing: who we married, whether or not we had children, the families we were born to, will forever hinder our ability to make good work.
To be a writer is a choice, after all, and I continue to make it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Life-Changing Magic Of Bullet Journaling”

That doesn’t mean I’m not down to try whatever weird fad is trending on Instagram, because, I don’t know, life is short and why not try and give it a little structure, so I can use my unfortunately minimal time to its utmost potential? This desire to bring some sort of order to my life is what led me to finally bite the bullet and try bullet journaling.
Before getting into exactly what bullet journaling is, let me give you just a little more background on my own organizational and indeed journaling proclivities.
The bullet journal method encourages users to write and write and write, and so it appealed to me on the level that I wanted something distinct from the usual keyboard-based writing I was doing-and the bullet journal method is certainly distinct.
As intended, bullet journaling is a very well-regimented system.
The bullet journaling website offers a really comprehensive explanation of how it works, but the premise is quite simple: Journalers divide a notebook, pages of which they manually number, into sections including an index, a daily log, a monthly log, and a future log.
The thing about bullet journaling is that its benefits extend beyond simply helping with the problem at hand, but rather it works to soothe the anxiety of the specific type of person who can’t otherwise get a handle on things like organizing schedules and to-do lists.
It’s actually soothing for me to create my own lists and schedules, and because the bullet journal is filled with blank pages which I fill up in my own way, I also feel okay when I skip a day of journaling or just fill page after page with drawings or beginnings of stories I want to write.
Instead, bullet journaling has given shape to my oftentimes crazy life and allowed me the freedom of figuring out how I want to do things and when.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Advice For Aspiring Black Writers, From Black Writers”

There are more and more black men and women authors putting out work that reflects their experiences, and getting the recognition they deserve for it.
To help those in need of a little push, we reached out to some of said authors and had them share what advice they’d give to aspiring black writers.
Read their words, ahead. Natashia Deon, author of Grace.
“Persist. This is a hard business to navigate: Writers in general, and black writers in particular, will face a lot of rejection in publishing. You have two tasks as a writer: the first is to do the work. Hone your craft: read, write, revise, repeat. Enrich your voice. Become the best writer you can be. Your second task is to submit your work. Brave rejection after rejection after rejection until you find the one person in publishing who says yes, who understands and believes in your work and will open the door for you. You can weather a thousand noes; all you need is one yes.”
“Write as if you’re telling a story to a friend. Write as if no one is ever going to read it. Don’t write to compete with other writers. Don’t edit while writing a draft or you’ll never finish.”
“Reason two: I was afraid it was too diverse. Unfortunately, I think a lot of marginalized writers understand this one. I am eternally grateful for We Need Diverse Books, the grassroots organization that advocates for diversity in children’s literature. It is kicking down doors and walls that have limited the lenses presented in children’s books. But the work of We Need Diverse Books is recent; it is also ongoing. As the idea of turning that short story into a novel bounced around in my head, diversity in Young Adult novels was rare. Books where black girls were more than sassy sidekicks were rare. And books about black girls dealing with police brutality? Even rarer.”
“I could probably list a million more reasons why I didn’t want to write The Hate U Give, but one thing outweighs them all: I had to write it for myself. I couldn’t focus on whether it would be the idea that would get me in the door. I couldn’t worry that it was too diverse. I couldn’t be concerned that it would make someone uncomfortable. I had to see it come to life on the page. It was one of the best decisions I’ve made.”
“So writers, learn from my mistakes: Let your heart explore other stories, let your characters be their unapologetic selves, and write the book that you’re afraid to write. Above all, write it for yourself. You won’t regret it.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “How ‘Harriet The Spy’ Made Me Into A Writer”

In 1995, I found someone who finally made sense to me: Harriet M. Welsch.
For those unfamiliar, Harriet M. Welsch is the hero of Harriet the Spy, whom I met first through the Nickelodeon movie and then through Louise Fitzhugh’s 1964 novel, on which the movie was loyally based.
Harriet is 11 years old, an aspiring writer, and a diligent spy.
To some, this might seem like a barrier to truly living, as it does to Harriet’s father when he tells her, “You’re going to find that sometimes just experiencing things can be enough.” But young Harriet is unmoved, insisting, “That’s how I experience things. With my notebook.”
Harriet invigorated my desire to be a writer, but she also normalized my desire to be alone, to observe, to remember.
That Harriet is treated gently by Fitzhugh and, within the text and film, by her nanny Ole Golly, delivers a clear message: Living like Harriet isn’t bad, it just might have bad consequences.
It might sound hyperbolic to say this fictional 11-year-old gave me permission to cultivate the aspects of my personality that would turn me into not just a writer but a good writer, but the values I still see in Harriet the Spyhave been echoed in the reading I’ve done throughout my life.
An especially resonant idea is that of the importance of maintaining close correspondence with oneself, put forth as well in Joan Didion’s, “On Keeping a Notebook.” And though I’m sure Didion didn’t expect to be compared to Harriet M. Welsch, bear with me while I do just that.

The orginal article.