Summary of “Professional Romance Novelists Can Write 3,000 Words a Day. Here’s How They Do It.”

Romance writers who are able to get published or sell their books through self-publishing are true hustlers.
The women who succeed here are not just writers, they’re business people, and they spend hours keeping up with fans online and doing their own marketing, in addition to writing.
H.M. Ward, a self-published romance author who’s sold 13 million books, says she writes two hours a day, averaging about 2,500 words an hour.
What makes these writers so prolific? What gives them the ability to sit down and create day after day? Indeed, it’s taking the romance out of the process, and treating it like any normal job.
If you’re aiming to write 10 pages, the goal marks seem more achievable.
If You’re Stuck, Write Crap For a Few Minutes If you’re blocked or lacking motivation, set the timer for five minutes and make an agreement with yourself that you can toss whatever you write.
Or you could just lie to yourself by repeating over and over how great writing is and how you can’t wait to start.
Start Small, But Write Everyday Before Thompson was writing full-time, and before her daughter was grown up-she’s just graduated college-she would aim to write two pages a day, before she left for work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 7 Best Books I’ve Ever Read About Writing”

I’ve made a list of the best books I’ve read on writing.
If you write, and you haven’t read On Writing, it’s time to stop everything you do and get that book.
On Writing Well by William Zinsser A solid book with solid advice about writing non-fiction.
Zinsser, a respected writer and teacher, talks about the principles and methods of writing in this book.
Ernest Hemingway on Writing by Larry W. Phillips There’s no point in denying it; Hemingway is one of the best writers in modern history.
Hemingway believed that there’s no pride in writing about writing.
Nobody Wants to Read Your Shit by Steven Pressfield Pressfield is one of my favorite writers.
If you don’t know how to sell your writing, no one will ever read it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Hemingway’s Advice on Writing, Ambition, and the Art of Revision”

Hemingway and Samuelson fishing and talking in Key West.”As a writer you should not judge. You should understand,” Ernest Hemingway counseled in his 1935 Esquire compendium of writing advice, addressed to an archetypal young correspondent but based on a real-life encounter that had taken place a year earlier.
In 1934, a 22-year-old aspiring writer named Arnold Samuelson set out to meet his literary hero, hoping to steal a few moments with Hemingway to talk about writing.
Alongside these edifying essentials, Hemingway offered young Samuelson some concrete writing advice.
The most important thing I’ve learned about writing is never write too much at a time Never pump yourself dry.
Don’t get discouraged because there’s a lot of mechanical work to writing.
Sometimes you can go on writing for years before it shows.
The only thing I can advise you is to keep on writing but it’s a damned tough racket.
The only way you can ever stay on top is by writing good stuff.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Death of Hollywood’s Middle Class”

In 2015, Jack Allison, a comedian with a nerdy affect and an impish wit, was a staff writer on The Jimmy Kimmel Show, doing what he loved best: Hanging out with a bunch of other funny people, writing jokes, and downing Twizzlers.
Almost all of the focus on this upheaval has been on viewers’ first-world problem of too many good shows to watch or the corporate gamesmanship between iconic Hollywood conglomerates and the tech giants who seek to usurp them in delivering the world its entertainment.
The tech entrants into Hollywood typically do not sell their shows to other platforms, which means there are no syndicated reruns, and networks, feeling the pressure to keep up, air far fewer reruns.
A writer on a Netflix show is paid differently from someone on a Hulu or YouTube Premium show, because fees are based on the number of subscribers that a service has.
More recently, the WGA successfully loosened the exclusive holds that studios traditionally held over lower-paid writers, which keep them from seeking other employment while they’re working on a show-which meant that if you’d finished working on one season and were waiting to see if the show was re-upped for a second, you couldn’t seek another gig.
Even with these attempts to level the playing field, there is still the fact that a season for a streaming show is typically less than half the length of a traditional network show.
If someone like Allison theoretically went from a network late-night show to its streaming equivalent, say, Norm Macdonald Has a Show on Netflix, or Sarah Silverman’s I Love You, America on Hulu, it’s a completely different financial outlook.
“My husband is a writer and director. The fact that I have that protection, meaning if one of us were to drop dead, we would definitely still have a source of income to take care of our kids. If I’m only on one show and it’s only 20 weeks, what am I going to do the rest of the year? And if the show is 10 episodes?”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Helpful advice for aspiring writers of all ages |”

That sentence is great advice for writers of any age.
Once upon a time, she was a girl with a passion for words – “From the gate, I was like, ‘I want to be a writer – I want to write everything: poetry and short stories and fiction and ‘” She’s gone on to write more than 30 books – including Miracle’s Boys, Brown Girl Dreaming and After Tupac and D Foster – that span all those categories and then some.
“You don’t need to have a great vocabulary. What you need to have is a creative way of using the words you have. I think sometimes it is detrimental to writers to have too much of a vocabulary because they just rely on the word that they know how to define and they end up breaking the first rule of writing: Show, don’t tell.”
“Young writers can learn so much from reading picture books and really engaging in the text and how the language is laid on the page. With picture books, [writers] are working with a reader who has a very short attention span and you have to get them from line one and hold them to page 32. That’s a challenge, but it’s also a challenge that’s not going to be intimidating for a young writer. It also allows them to experiment with tone and form, especially poetic form, because picture books are intentional, the line breaks are intentional, and each line is laying down an image.”
“As a kid, you have a right to be in the world fully and you have a right to see representations of yourself wherever you go. And if you don’t, write your way out. Figure out why that is so, and rather than fixating on the dilemma of it, challenge it. Write the challenge, and that’s where your writing’s going to break through and create something new.”
“Writing is a lot of work. When I look at Brown Girl Dreaming, I rewrote that book 33 times. When I look at Another Brooklyn, I rewrote that about 16 times. I think people like the idea of being writers; I don’t think they like being re-writers.”
“It’s going to be the difference between finishing something and having a whole bunch of half-finished things in your drawer. For people who are starting out writing, know that your piece of writing is going to fall apart and it’s going to get really hard. But it’s the best place to be, because now your work is ahead of you. And you know what you have to do to make it better.”
“Whenever kids start asking me about their stuff getting published, I’m like, ‘That’s not what you should worry about. You should worry about writing the best piece that you possibly can.’ Writing is such a process. It’s an ongoing process, and you don’t write something in September and have it published by December. It takes much longer. If you really want to invest in the world of writing, you have to invest time and labor and faith in it.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Happened When I Tried to Learn Something New Every Day for a Month”

In attempt to challenge myself and step out of my comfort zone, I’ve decided to learn a new skill every day for a month.
I already learn new things everyday-reporting inherently prompts you to learn something each time you work on a story, even when it’s about an industry or topic that you’ve covered for years.
Thanks to Fast Company’s extensive coverage of brain science and its effect on productivity, I knew it wouldn’t be as simple as hitting up a new website, and I wanted at least the majority of the things I learned to fall into the category of useful skills.
So I parsed out a projected four weeks of learning roughly along the lines of cognitive and physical skills that ran the gamut between picking up some basic words and phrases of a new language and reciting poetry, to the aforementioned knitting, and the knife skills used in cooking.
I scheduled the more challenging ones for the beginning of the week, and on the weekends I gave myself the opportunity to just learn some fun facts.
From Learning a Language to How to Make Radish Flowers I started the challenge by trying to learn a few simple phrases in Hebrew since I am going to be attending a tech conference in Israel in September.
Making the Knowledge Stick What I tried to do while taking on these new skills and knowledge was to be mindful of how I was learning.
I discovered this through a report in The New York Times in which three experts confirmed that although children naturally learn languages more easily, adults can too, but it helps if the one they are trying to learn is in the same family as their first.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to Be Emotionally Resilient? Science Says Do This”

Do you worry a lot? Sometimes over things you absolutely can’t control, so that worrying about them serves no practical purpose? Do you think you worry too much? Do you worry that all this worrying may not be good for you?
A new study shows, there’s something you can do that will help you worry less and become more emotionally resilient.
Anyone can do it, it doesn’t take much time, and there’s no cost at all: Write down what you’re worrying about.
Keeping a “Worry journal” is an element of cognitive behavior therapy, or CBT, which has long been known to help with a great many emotional disorders.
Subjects were randomly selected to either keep a worry journal for 10 days, or else a “Thought journal” in which they simply recorded their thoughts.
Ten days isn’t a long time to address ongoing anxiety, but nevertheless, at the end of the 10-day experiment, those with worry journals were asked to review their worries and see how many had come true.
30 days later the worry journal group was still doing better than the control group.
Follow your own emotional prompts and try writing in your journal when your worried or scared or angry.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Don’t Press Send: The New Rules for Good Writing”

I’ve been let off parking tickets by writing politely and apologetically to the council to explain the circumstances.
In London Fields, Martin Amis offered the best postcard-writing advice I’ve ever read: “The letter with the foreign postmark that tells of good weather, pleasant food and comfortable accommodation,” he warned, “Isn’t nearly as much fun to read, or to write, as the letter that tells of rotting chalets, dysentery and drizzle. Who else but Tolstoy has made happiness really swing on the page?”.
There is little that paralyses the average person more than writing a letter of condolence.
Five simple ways to engage and convince your reader1 Bait the hook Call it audience awareness, call it decorum, call it reader relations if you like, but the key principle of all persuasive writing is customer service.
2 Be clear A lot of style guides, with good reason, tell their readers to write Plain English.
Whatever you call it, the basic style for non-literary writing wants to put clarity, which usually means simplicity, first.
If you’re not writing “Little Gidding”, do it the other way.5 Read it aloud It is almost impossibly hard to write, formally, about cadence – the term usually given to the rhythms of prose.
The formally learned skills of reading and writing come from the informally learned skills of speaking and hearing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “7 Expert-Approved Ways to Write a Better To-Do List”

When feeling overwhelmed by the mountain of tasks ahead of you, sit down, take a breath, and write a to-do list.
An entry on the first list, for example, might read, “If I have a lot of energy, then I will take a walk at lunch.” The second list should feature more mindless tasks like cleaning out your inbox, organizing your desk, or even setting aside time for a power nap.3.
Plugging your to-do list into an Eisenhower Matrix breaks it into four categories.
Tasks deemed urgent but not important can be delegated to others if possible, and entries that are neither urgent nor important should be crossed off the list altogether.
So not only does creating a visual to-do list help you memorize tasks, it also forces you to think them through ahead of time.5.
Instead of organizing entries by time or urgency, a one-three-five list looks at the size of the tasks at hand.
From there, pick three smaller, but still important tasks to fill out the middle of your list.
Instead of writing a to-do list, the author of Get It Done: From Procrastination to Creative Genius in 15 Minutes A Day takes the pressure off by creating a “Could-do” list.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Excerpt: ‘Generation Friends’ by Saul Austerlitz”

The Friends writers’ room was simultaneously a party room and a prison cell, a wild daily gathering whose participants, like the dinner guests in Luis Buñuel’s The Exterminating Angel, could never leave.
Participants were thrilled to be granted the privilege of being a part of the work of writing Friends.
The remarkable thing about the Friends writers’ room, Chase believed, was its complete allergy to compromise.
The sheer volume of polished material that the writers of Friends had to come up with placed inordinate pressure on the writers’ room to work in sync and to pick up each other’s slack.
The Friends writers’ room was, as some of its participants described it, a remarkable feat of alchemy, in which a dozen talented individuals transformed into a team that was far greater than the sum of its parts.
Being in the Friends writers’ room, Sikowitz thought, was like an emotional stock market.
The Friends characters were the writers’ stand-ins and doppelgangers, their adventures and discoveries simultaneously reflections of the writers’ own lives and romanticized versions of their more humdrum existences.
Kauffman notwithstanding, the Friends writers’ room was, at the outset, an exceedingly male place, its tastes and interests formed by the concerns of funny young men.

The orginal article.