Summary of “What Netflix doesn’t want you to know about how its synopses are written”

Netflix synopses can be concise, sassy, opaque, or on-the-nose.
Netflix descriptions aren’t all so conversational or tongue-in-cheek.
I wrote back asking if there were any details they could share, and was again rebuffed: “I don’t have anything to share, but thanks for checking.” First of all, you’re welcome! And second of all, what? Why, I wondered, wouldn’t Netflix want to let me in on the wondrous mystery of their movie synopses?
“The Netflix team decided to scan in photos and titles from the boxes anyway and wait for the cease-and-desist letters,” Keating writes.
I then contacted Keating, who responded that she doesn’t know how Netflix generates their movie descriptions now.
Keating had no explanation for why Netflix would be secretive about the way they generate their synopses now.
That’s what Netflix doesn’t want us to know.
“All Netflix synopsis writers are full-time, experienced, professional writers hailing from digital and print journalism, film scholarship and creative writing backgrounds. Many have 10 or 20+ years of experience and this also includes bilingual staff who bring regional content expertise. Their key objectives are to create 100% accurate synopses and provide the most trustworthy entertainment experience possible to help give viewers important contextual information about a title.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Never Been Able to Keep a Journal Before? This Is the Journal Format for You”

An easy journal idea The idea comes from content marketer Barry Davret via Medium.
In a recent post, he explained the dead-simple journal format he uses to fuel his writing.
In your journal, write down 10 to 12 experiences from your day.
What use is a weird brain dump of random mundane details? Besides the proven mental health benefits of this sort of expressive writing, periodically you’ll be motivated to look back over what you’ve written, Davret explains, and that’s when the magic happens.
“Pick a handful of entries in your journal. Ask yourself what it teaches you about yourself, people, or life. You won’t find answers all the time. Once in a while, you will find one of those aha! moments that lead to growth,” he writes.
An even easier journal idea Still sound like too much for you? Author Gretchen Rubin may have the perfect journaling solution for even the laziest would-be journal keepers.
“One sentence is enough. When I look back on it years later, that one sentence really does keep memories vivid – it really does bring back the past – which is one of the things you really want a journal to do,” Rubin explains.
Have you struggled to keep a journal? Have you discovered any tricks or techniques that make it easier for you?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Digital Distraction Is Bad for Creativity · The Walrus”

In July 2010, I travelled to Fernie, British Columbia, for a ten-day stint as a fiction instructor at a summer writing school.
A common enough feeling among writers, I suspect, since so many of us were pariahs, nerds, wallflowers, social refugees in our formative years.
Again the door behind us opened and released a gust of sound from the clubhouse, and it struck me-or it strikes me now as I try to conjugate the moment-that that crowded hall is an apt analogy for the public side of the writer’s life, in both its positive and negative aspects.
As writers, we sometimes crave company, inclusion-the respect and affection of colleagues, the interest of readers, not to mention the social input and “Material” that our fellow human primates supply.
It’s a place where-as human primates first and writers second-we all reflexively seek the comforts of company, the pleasure of mutual respect, sometimes the professional necessities of connection and alliance.
Hemingway once sneered at those writers who could “Talk away any number of books” while lounging in cafés conversing with colleagues.
I’m a more distracted writer than I was a decade ago.
Which means I’m not writing as well as I might be, period.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Best books of 2017”

This truly is one of the best books I’ve read in years: funny, outrageous, touching, intimate, glorious.
I like most of the books I read but, now and again, I read one I wish I’d written myself.
I’ve barely started reading The White Book by Han Kang, but I can already tell it will be one of my books of the year.
A man recently claimed that 2017 had been “a thin year” for poetry; this has certainly not been the experience of attentive readers.
In the first annus horribilis of Trump, I found myself reading more periodicals than books – and small magazines rather than the mainstream journals.
The linked stories in Elizabeth Strout’s Anything Is Possible are among the best fiction I’ve read this year, and the poems in Simon Armitage’s The Unaccompanied the best verse.
I think it’s one of the finest books I’ve yet read. Then there’s Sebastian Barry’s Days Without End and Kamila Shamsie’s Home Fire.
What have you enjoyed reading in 2017? Send your choices in 150 words or fewer to readers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Wave of New Fiction From Nigeria, as Young Writers Experiment With New Genres”

A new wave of thematically and stylistically diverse fiction is emerging from the country, as writers there experiment with different genres and explore controversial subjects like violence against women, polygamy and the rise of the Islamist militant group Boko Haram.
Rather than selling publication rights to American publishing houses, as most foreign publishers do, Cassava Republic prints and distributes its titles to American booksellers through Consortium, a book distributor based in Minnesota.
When Ms. Bakare-Yusuf co-founded Cassava Republic in Abuja in 2006, her primary goal was to publish Nigerian writers who had gained stature in the West but weren’t being read at home.
More than a decade later, Cassava Republic has published more than 50 titles, and has expanded into romance, crime, memoir, fantasy, science fiction and children’s books.
Cassava Republic has published eight books in the United States, including children’s books, crime novels and literary fiction, a nonfiction book about the West African music scene and “Longthroat Memoirs,” a food memoir by Yemisi Aribisala, which came out this month.
The novel, which was published in Nigeria this spring, was shortlisted for Britain’s Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction, and received ecstatic reviews in The Guardian and The New York Times.
Writers and publishers in Nigeria still face significant obstacles.
The minimum wage in Nigeria hovers around $59 a month, and a new book costs around $8.Despite such hurdles, Nigeria’s publishing industry has blossomed in recent years, following the country’s return to democracy in 1999 after decades of military dictatorship.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 1 Sentence That Will Make You a More Effective Speaker Every Time”

“Clear writing is clear thinking.” My tenth grade English teacher shared that morsel of wisdom once as I was slogging through a 20-page term paper with no idea where I was going or how to make the points I wanted to make; every word I wrote led me further down a rabbit hole of rambling sentences, incomplete thoughts and disjointed ideas.
What’s more, they lack a big idea – a powerful insight, perspective or thought that serves as the backbone of their presentation; the big idea is the spine that holds everything up.
Create the single sentence Once you’ve settled on your topic and decide where you stand, the next question to ask yourself is: Can I articulate my position, my stance, my big idea, in one sentence? In Arianna Huffington’s case, after sifting through the data, she was able to distill her message into a single sentence: only by renewing our relationship with sleep can we take back control of our lives.
Distilling your message into a single sentence will make your writing flow better, and make your key points easier to arrange.
Think of the single sentence as a lighthouse guiding you through fog.
If you become overwhelmed with an abundance of data or competing themes, the single sentence will help you stay on track.
Any piece of data, story or anecdote that doesn’t jive with your single sentence will wind up sidetracking and diluting your message.
If you can’t state your idea in a single sentence, don’t give up.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Get Your Mind to Read”

These examples help us understand why readers might decode well but score poorly on a test; they lack the knowledge the writer assumed in the audience.
If a text concerned a familiar topic, habitually poor readers ought to read like good readers.
In one experiment, third graders – some identified by a reading test as good readers, some as poor – were asked to read a passage about soccer.
The poor readers who knew a lot about soccer were three times as likely to make accurate inferences about the passage as the good readers who didn’t know much about the game.
Why test her reading with a passage about spiders, or the Titanic? If topics are random, the test weights knowledge learned outside the classroom – knowledge that wealthy children have greater opportunity to pick up.
The Common Core Standards for reading specify nearly nothing by way of content that children are supposed to know – the document valorizes reading skills.
Turning the tide will require profound changes in how reading is taught, in standardized testing and in school curriculums.
Underlying all these changes must be a better understanding of how the mind comprehends what it reads.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Life After ESPN”

The ESPN layoffs dumped about 100 writers and TV hosts back into the workforce.
At the outset, ESPN Dallas wanted its writers to blog everything.
Watkins appreciated the irony: Where he’d once fled to ESPN from a shrinking newspaper, now a newspaper was rescuing him from the shrinking Worldwide Leader.
Kuharsky worked at ESPN for nine years, covering the Titans and the AFC South.
A few hours after he was laid off, Scott Burnside, who covered hockey for ESPN for 13 years, got a phone call.
Crawford came to ESPN in 2003 - as cohost of Cold Pizza, the in utero version of First Take - and caught the last decade-plus of the network’s golden age.
Now, Crawford has embarked on what he calls his “Practice retirement.” At ESPN, he had money but no free time.
As Crawford put it to me: “I got their attention by telling them, look, there is life after ESPN, and it is awesome.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “An Unabashed Appreciation of Smitten Kitchen, the Ur-Food Blog”

One of them was Deb Perelman, a New Jersey native living in New York City, who, in 2003, started a blog to write about her bad dates.
Now, with the publication of Deb’s second cookbook-“Smitten Kitchen Every Day”-it is poised to take Deb into the realm of her lodestars, the Inas, Marthas, and Nigellas she jokingly writes about imagining herself to be.
Most of my disturbingly encyclopedic knowledge of everything S.K.-the way Deb’s recipe-making mind works, her family dynamics, her likes and dislikes-comes from being a longtime reader, and from having cooked and eaten probably hundreds of her recipes.
I’m not some outlier weirdo here! To prove it, I asked a friend who has also been an S.K. reader since the beginning to quickly list five things she knows about Deb’s palate.
I’d add another item, and probably list it first: the enduring backbone of the S.K. aesthetic is that Deb is a recovering vegetarian who sees meat as a form of seasoning.
Deb assumes, rightly, that almost everyone is on a budget, and builds frugality into her recipes in small but welcome ways.
Her at-home halal-cart chicken, complete with copious “White sauce,” provides all the primal satisfaction of the original, and she has unlocked the secret of the carrot-ginger dressing that comes on sushi-bar salads, which I will always think of as Dojo dressing, after the wallet-friendly restaurant near N.Y.U. I also can’t wait to try a few of the weirder-sounding dishes, like “Caramelized cabbage risotto.” Deb really, really loves cabbage.
Such is Deb’s power: I trust her when she tells me that something called “Sesame-peanut pesto” is worth getting out the Cuisinart for, and that I should serve “Loaded breakfast potato skins” at my next brunch.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This Is The Most Important Thing You Can Do Each Morning”

To prepare for the day ahead by meditating on a short prompt: Where am I standing in my own way? What’s the smallest step I can take toward a big thing today? What blessings can I count right now? Why do I care so much about impressing people? What is the harder choice I’m avoiding? Do I rule my fears, or do they rule me? How will today’s difficulties show my character?
To quote her further: ‘Once we get those muddy, maddening, confusing thoughts on the page, we face our day with clearer eyes.
Seems to have done his journaling in the morning, despite his noted struggles with arising early.
From what we can gather, he would jot down notes about what he was likely to face in the day ahead. Literally walking himself through what the day would bring and what he would need to bring to the day.
Reviewing the day is what helped Seneca prepare for the one that would begin the following morning.
It strikes me that the best approach would be to combine these two methods-to prepare for the day ahead and to reflect at the end of the day on how the preparation turned out.
A former slave who lived a life not nearly as cushy or powerful as Seneca or Marcus, he says, “Every day and night keep thoughts like these at hand-write them, read them aloud, talk to yourself and others about them.” Anyway, that’s what I tried to do in creating The Daily Stoic Journal.
A framework for the day ahead. A coping mechanism for troubles in your personal life.

The orginal article.