Summary of “Stephen King’s 20 Rules for Writers”

We’ve talked so much about the reader, but you can’t forget that the opening line is important to the writer, too.
Now King admits that he doesn’t think much about the opening line as he writes, in a first draft, at least.
Revision in the second draft, “One of them, anyway,” may “Necessitate some big changes” says King in his 2000 memoir slash writing guide On Writing.
It is an essential process, and one that “Hardly ever fails.” Below, we bring you King’s top twenty rules from On Writing.
“Timid writers like passive verbs for the same reason that timid lovers like passive partners. The passive voice is safe.”
Read, read, read. “If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time to write.”
“One cannot imitate a writer’s approach to a particular genre, no matter how simple what that writer is doing may seem.”
“Writing isn’t about making money, getting famous, getting dates, getting laid or making friends. Writing is magic, as much as the water of life as any other creative art. The water is free. So drink.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Art of the Sidle: The Slickest Move in NBA Media”

Sidling has become the great skill on the NBA beat, as fundamental to reporting as the corner 3 is to the sport itself.
Talking about “Casual conversations” and “One-on-ones” can make NBA reporters sound like Bachelorette contestants.
Sidling became a rite of NBA reporting around the time of the Lakers’ back-to-back titles in 2009 and 2010.
To sidle, NBA reporters become geographers, learning the route a player takes to his car.
A national NBA writer told me: “It’s really annoying when you have a sidle-and it’s absolutely your sidle-and some local reporter comes in like that.” The writer pretended to thrust a microphone in my face.
Got a minute to hear why NBA reporters sidle? One reason is that reporters don’t like revealing their hole cards.
Occasionally, reporters will flaunt a sidle in their copy.
The postseason is also when you can see one of NBA reporting’s sneakiest moves.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Yan Lianke’s Forbidden Satires of China”

Yan is routinely referred to as China’s most controversial novelist, thanks to his scandalous satires about the brutalities of its Communist past and the moral nullity of its market-driven transformation.
Yan does not exempt himself from his critique; his books often feature an alter ego, also named Yan Lianke, a hack writer who periodically goes back home to gather material.
Yan brushed the idea aside, without mentioning that last year he published a novel in which the fictional Yan Lianke does precisely this.
“The people we met today, they know the name Yan Lianke and that he’s a Henanese who’s come by a bit of fame,” he said.
After we’d sat down, Entrekin asked Yan about the political situation in China.
Not only has he frequently been prevented from publishing new books but publishers have also suppressed his backlist: “Anything that has the name Yan Lianke is indiscriminately removed from the shelves.”
Yan used to joke that the day he managed to learn ten words of English he would move abroad, but he suspects that he wouldn’t feel the same urgency in his work if he left China.
Yan told me that he intended to probe the inherent falsity of life in China.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Form A Daily Writing Habit-It Will Improve Your Life”

One of the most important habits that I’ve formed in my life is daily writing.
Without question, writing every day has brought me many great things: A better career, fulfillment, self-improvement, and most importantly, the ability to share my ideas with you, the reader.
At some point, you have to look at yourself and say, “I’m a writer.” And then, start doing your job by writing every day.
Writing every day will demonstrate the power of compounding like very few other things can.
To be honest, there are many other benefits to writing every day.
“That’s great and all. But how do you even form a daily writing habit?”.
Remove distractionsTell the people in your life about your daily writing habit.
Ask them to not disturb you during the time you’re writing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “An enemy of envy”

I knew why she was getting what she got and he got what he got, and I was eaten alive by this envy.
Eaten alive, and now I tell young artists and writers: “You must make an enemy of envy today. Today. By tonight, because it will eat you alive.”
Nietzsche thought of envy as a confused but important signal from our deeper selves about what we really want.
We should learn to study our envy forensically, keeping a diary of envious moments, and then sift through episodes to discern the shape of a future, better self.
The envy we don’t own up to will otherwise end up emitting what Nietzsche called ‘sulfurous odours.
‘ Bitterness is envy that doesn’t understand itself.
My favorite writing on the subject of envy is the “Jealousy” chapter of Anne Lamott’s Bird By Bird.
Should you get everything you always wanted, remember the words on a pillow Joan Rivers kept in her apartment: “Don’t Expect Praise Without Envy Until You Are Dead.”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Movie Assassin – Popula”

When I met people, they’d say, “Wait! Aren’t you the movie girl?” Sometimes they would say, “Do you like anything?” A guy in a bar told me once that he and his friends called me “The movie assassin.”
“Me no understand movie joke,” the Julie puppet said.
Fuck those people! I felt the day, my $125, and my chance to hold forth on the most anticipated movie of the fall, slipping out from under me.
“I am not saying I’m positive that the movie is going to be bad. I mean, I give everything a chance.” I was sure I’d given her my bullshit speech about how I just wanted movies to be good.
“It’s just-very well written I guess I thought-I-well, I mean, I guess when I said the movie was going to be bad what I mean is that-What I was trying to say is that it’s probably not going to be as good as the book. That’s really what I meant. Because I really loved the book.”
The movie seemed very clearly bad. Binoche tittered with rueful appreciation as her patients sexually harassed her, peeled a plum with her sexy teeth, and-because what’s hotter than an irrepressible spirit during war-tickled out Bach on a bomb-damaged grand piano.
From my very first Thursday as a movie reviewer, I’d had the same routine.
I thought a lot about my lying review of that racist, boring, laughable, pseudo-intellectual movie.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why You Should Watch SNL Like a Sport”

Seemingly in response to something Birbiglia’s character said about a certain cast member’s work on the show, Tami Sagher’s character tells him, “I’m glad you’re keeping score.” Birbiglia says, “It’s the only live sporting event of comedy,” to which Gillian Jacobs’s character responds, “But comedy isn’t a sport.”
Whether SCTV in the ’80s or Mr. Show in the ’90s or Chappelle’s Show in the ’00s or Key and Peele in the ’10s, shows that produced better sketches more frequently have come along, but SNL has lasted because of how singularly exciting it is when something really hits.
If a sketch is bad, you won’t be able to deny it’s bad. And just like sports, you can analyze exactly why it was bad: “The premise didn’t totally make sense for the target of satire.” “The timing was off.” “Didn’t really have an ending.” “Didn’t really have an ending.” “Didn’t really have an ending.” That’s part of the fun! If I had a nickel for every time I Gchatted “They took too long to establish what was supposed to be funny” to a friend, I’d have, like, 50 nickels! There just isn’t much use comparing it to other comedy shows.
Though a great SNL sketch, especially when clipped online, can offer a similar experience to any great sketch show, watching SNL live is unlike any other experience on TV. Well, you know, except sports.
Actually watching SNL makes up only part of how I enjoy following the show like a sports team – and not even a large part.
If you’ve seen Don’t Think Twice, you can imagine that when a new cast member joins the show, all his friends at home are both really happy and really resentful.
All in all, sounds good, right? How can you start? Read Live From New York, Tom Shales and James Andrew Miller’s definitive oral history of the show.
Lastly, use the off-season months to follow rumors of cast moves and to think about what the show is or isn’t doing, and what it might mean its future.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Finding Comfort in Small Spaces”

I do not need to dwell on the specifics of my eating disorder, but suffice it to say that from as far back as I was obsessed with miniatures – as far back, that is, as I can remember – I thought obsessively about the size of my body, and sought both comfort and punishment in food.
The eating disorder, which took various forms over the years, often manifested in excessive eating at night, countered by exercise and highly restricted eating the following day, and on and on.
Halfway through the plate, in a state of transcendence, I realized with a start that I had been eating without censure or guilt.
One of the things you learn in recovery from an eating disorder – or in any kind of recovery, or perhaps in any period of healthy development – is that your deepest flaws, in different degrees or intensities, or differently directed, are also strengths.
Recovery from an eating disorder is not a free-for-all.
You don’t go from punishing yourself for eating bread to eating twenty loaves.
The way out of an eating disorder isn’t insane, unbridled freedom.
The narrator is writing, here, of a small space within her own mind.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Mathematicians Can’t Find the Hay in a Haystack”

The hay-in-a-haystack phenomenon is at work in one of the first objects that kids encounter in mathematics: the number line.
Points on the number line include the positive and negative integers, rational numbers and all irrational numbers – those numbers, like pi or $latex sqrt $, that can’t be expressed as a ratio.
Irrational numbers occupy the vast, vast majority of space on a number line – so vast that if you were to pick a number on the number line at random, there is literally a 100 percent chance that it will be irrational.
Yet despite their overwhelming presence, we almost never encounter irrational numbers in our daily lives.
The numbers we know best are the extremely rare numbers, the special numbers – the needles in the haystack.
Rational numbers have the distinctive property that it’s possible to write them down.
Irrational numbers have an infinite decimal expansion.
In my article, I explained how techniques from a field called “Tropical geometry” serve as an especially sly way of deducing the existence of these ubiquitous geometric objects – the ones that, like the irrational numbers, are everywhere, even if you can’t write them down.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to write the perfect sentence”

The sentence is our writing commons, the shared ground where all writers walk.
For James Baldwin, the only goal was “To write a sentence as clean as a bone”.
Some of this is true but none of it is a good way of learning how to write a sentence.
They fasten on content and forget about form – forgetting that content and form are the same thing, that what a sentence says is the same as how it says it.
Like every skilled writer Woolf starkly varies sentence length.
A good lesson for any writer: make each sentence worth reading, and something in it will lead the reader into the next one.
A decade ago the American writer Gary Lutz gave a lecture to Columbia University students titled “The sentence is a lonely place”.
Good writers write not just in sentences but with sentences.

The orginal article.