Summary of “Gary Hart’s Presidential Bid and the Possible Setup That Ended It”

Why, Strother asked himself, should he rake up an issue that could never be resolved and might cause Hart more stress than surcease?
One of his stops was Colorado, where he had a meal with Gary Hart.
Hart knew that Strother had been friends with Billy Broadhurst, the man who had taken Hart on the fateful Monkey Business cruise.
According to Strother and others involved with the Hart campaign, Broadhurst was from that familiar political category, the campaign groupie and aspiring insider.
In retrospect, Hart asked, what did Strother make of the whole imbroglio?
“Ray said, ‘Why do you ask?’‚ÄČ” Hart told me, when I called to talk with him about the episode.
According to Hart, that plan would have involved: contriving an invitation from Broadhurst for Hart to come on a boat ride, when Hart intended to be working on a speech.
Arranging for the Broadhurst boat Hart thought he would be boarding, with some unmemorable name, to be unavailable-so that the group would have to switch to another boat, Monkey Business.

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Summary of “The most important science policy issue in every state”

“This is the most important election of our lifetime,” says Bill Holland, State Policy Director for the League of Conservation Voters.
While state waters extend only 3.5 miles offshore, companies wanting to develop in the zone would still have to get state permission to build pipelines and other infrastructure.
State lawmakers are taking a multipronged approach to tackling the problem: They’ve limited fills to three days to keep doctors from overprescribing the meds; state Attorney General Andy Beshear has sued seven pharmaceutical companies for failing to disclose how addictive their painkillers are; and a bipartisan bill to legalize medical cannabis, which for some could be used as an alternative pain medication, will likely be reintroduced in the 2019 legislature.
Her opponent, state Attorney General Bill Schuette, led the investigation of the crisis that resulted in charges against 15 former and current Flint and state officials.
The Empire State has a lot of water cleanup ahead. According to the state Department of Environmental Conservation, as of this past August, 54 bodies of water have harmful algae blooms-rapidly growing nutrient colonies that can kill marine life and cause illness in humans.
Though the state sided with the villagers and set aside $25 million for relief efforts, the town is still waiting on an alternative source of H2O. Lawmakers are addressing the state’s overall clean-water issues broadly: They’ve passed $2.5 billion in funding to replace pipes and install new treatment systems; estimates from the state comptroller’s office put the cost of proper plumbing closer to $40 billion.
The groups sued the state in July; the plaintiffs contend that Meridian underestimated how much sulfur, methane, and other pollutants the facility will emit, and that the state health department’s monitoring requirements are inadequate.
Some lawmakers and residents worry that the state will repeat the same policy missteps with the natural-gas industry that it did with coal: imposing only a few regulations to protect water and ecosystems, and offering generous tax breaks that result in little revenue for the state.

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Summary of “New Ikea report finds that people don’t feel at home in their homes”

3 minute Read. Every year, Ikea Group and INGKA Holding publishes a research report on how people live in and relate to a specific aspect of their homes.
In other words, 35% of people who live in cities don’t feel at home in their house or apartment.
Almost a quarter of people who live with others feel more comfortable outside of their homes altogether.
On the other hand, people report a creeping unease with their living spaces: 53% of young families don’t get a sense of belonging from their residential home.
“Life at home is changing, profoundly, all over the world,” the report concludes.
As the writer Sarah Amandolare pointed out a few years ago, “Home” has become less permanent and more transient than ever, and, as a result, we’ve stopped thinking of our homes as “Self-expression.”
Ikea, of course, has a stake in helping people feel like they can create a sense of belonging, regardless of where home is-and a real shot at doing so, given its scale and ubiquity in cities.
Rather than suggesting a new sofa, the report ends with an interactive quiz that asks about how you feel at home, mapping your answers on a pictograph and offering you a personalized “Manifesto” of affirmations about finding alone time and building community.

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Summary of “Google Pixel 3 and 3 XL review: the best camera gets a better phone”

More than anything else, that’s what I think Google focused on this year: improving the “Phone stuff.” The Pixel 3 and 3 XL are superb phones that attempt to address nearly all of the complaints people had about last year’s Pixels.
Don’t let the notch stop you from getting the XL if you want a big phone But all of these smartphone notches become kind of invisible to the naked eye when you actually use the phone for a while, and the Pixel 3 XL is no exception.
“The glass on Pixel 3 performs comparable with other premium smartphones and according to industry standards.” But I have a very difficult time believing that the scratches we got on two different Pixel 3 phones are in line with “Industry standards.” But the good news is that I’ve only seen these marks on the matte finish, not the glossy parts.
The Pixel 2 was the best phone camera for all of last year, and it seems like the Pixel 3 will be the best camera for all of this year.
Google has tuned the Pixel 3 and 3 XL to a remarkable degree.
The Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL are quite a bit like the S-year iPhones.
Where the Pixel 2 XL had a crappy screen, the Pixel 3 XL has a great one.
If you want the best Android experience and the best camera you can get on a phone today, the Pixel 3 is it.

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Summary of “H-1B: Fleeing Silicon Valley for Canada in the age of Trump”

Two weeks: That’s how quickly a foreign technology worker in Silicon Valley can get an employment permit from Canada.
As the administration of President Donald Trump has increased scrutiny of H-1B visas for skilled foreign workers and plans to ban their spouses from holding jobs in the U.S., Canada has been moving aggressively to suck top foreign talent out of Silicon Valley and other technology-rich regions of the U.S. The Canadian government won’t say if it’s leveraging the tumultuous and uncertain immigration climate in the U.S. But experts say Canada’s year-old “Global Skills Strategy” program, which offers work permits similar to America’s H-1B visa, is ideally structured to attract highly skilled foreign tech workers to Toronto, Montreal or Vancouver.
Trump’s plan to overhaul the H-1B – a visa intended for the kind of skilled workers Silicon Valley companies rely on but attacked by critics as a tool to replace American workers with cheaper foreign labor – has ratcheted up anxiety levels and created uncertainty for many skilled foreign tech workers in the U.S. “.
Rather than simply get a work permit, Khandelwal opted to obtain permanent residence in Canada – the equivalent of a U.S. green card.
Matthew Kolken, a New York immigration lawyer whose firm helps clients immigrate to both Canada and the U.S., said he’s had about a dozen foreign-citizen clients decide to move to Canada even though they were already in the midst of official proceedings to come to the U.S. “They gave up on their American dream,” Kolken said.
Google software engineer Karthik Ravindran, in Silicon Valley on an H-1B, applied for permanent residence in Canada late last year with his wife after the Trump administration first proposed banning foreign spouses from working.
Despite disruptions arising from Trump’s approach to immigration, the tech industry in Silicon Valley – where outrageous housing costs and horrific commutes are the norm – has more to worry about than Canada, said Harj Taggar, CEO of San Francisco-based Triplebyte, a jobs platform for software engineers.
A prominent Vancouver technology entrepreneur who travels regularly to Silicon Valley to help foreign tech workers move to Canada and launch startups, believes the U.S. immigration climate under Trump will produce broad, long-term effects.

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Summary of “The people who moved to Chernobyl”

Less than two hours’ drive from the capital Kiev, along the perimeter of the exclusion zone, it’s not just families looking for opportunities in these ghost towns, but also entrepreneurs.
Every day Vadim Minzuyk walks his dog along the high wire fence marking out the beginning of the exclusion zone.
“It’s like living in the north of Finland or Alaska,” says Vadim.
In his former hometown of Horlivka, eastern Ukraine, Vadim was a businessman turning over a million dollars a year.
Vadim remembers looking out of his back window to see the rebels erecting a barricade right against his garden fence.
After evacuating his children, Vadim and his wife soon followed.
For several months, living off savings, Vadim travelled around Ukraine looking for ways for his family to start again.
Vadim even re-employed seven of his former workers from Donbass, offering them accommodation by converting one of his houses into a hostel.

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Summary of “The Strangest Desert Festival In the World Makes Everyone’s Mad Max Dreams Come True”

The roots of the event now known as Wasteland Weekend date back to 2009, when around 150 Mad Max fans decided to take a camping trip in the desert.
They dubbed it Road Warrior Weekend, but in 2010 some of the attendees set their sights larger: the Wasteland founders envisioned a desert festival experience, “Based heavily on the Mad Max films,” they wrote, “But incorporating other iconic pieces of post-apocalyptic pop culture.”
Most Wasteland attendees use Wasteland-specific nicknames while they’re out in the dust, and camp together in “Tribes,” with coordinated costumes, elaborately-themed camps, and, often enough, complicated rivalries with other tribes.
They’re such Wasteland devotees that three years ago they were married in the Thunderdome; Ares wore a dress she Frankensteined together out of other, lesser dresses.
The motorized things-“Please don’t call them fucking art cars,” Spud pleads- people bring to Wasteland are usually not so speedy but rather the culmination of years of dreams and planning and work.
“Thanks, bro,” the snowmobile owner replies; his Wasteland name turns out to be Beast, and he’s the president of the Raging Ferals, a Wasteland-only motorcycle club.
He’s been sick, Warsaw explains, too sick to come out to Wasteland himself.
“Wasteland isn’t just a car show. It’s a way of life year-round.” His tribe, who mostly live in Fresno, meet weekly, to dream about what they’ll build next and “To pull our hair out over what we can’t afford. We spend all year building and creating and figuring out how to get it here.”

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Summary of “A farewell to Brazil, country of broken dreams”

The whole world was looking at the country with new interest: powered by the commodity boom, Brazil had recently overtaken Britain as the world’s sixth largest economy, and it was flexing new diplomatic muscle.
For me, there was a particular attraction: I came to Brazil after 12 years of reporting in sub-Sarahan Africa and South Asia, where I wrote dozens of stories about projects that were designed to end poverty and reduce inequality.
In February of 2014, I wrote a first article about a sprawling graft scheme, introducing Globe readers to Lava Jato – “Car wash” in Portuguese, the police code name of the criminal investigation that would come to be the dominant story of my time in Brazil.
Much of the success in reducing poverty in Brazil was due to a sharp rise in the minimum wage and expansion in the manufacturing and service sectors – but now those areas began layoffs, and by the time the Olympics came to town, the unemployment rate was more than 12 per cent.
Those were feelings I could totally understand, but sometimes I would push back a bit, pointing out that many of the gains Brazil made in the best years – a surge in vaccination coverage of children, a rise in adult literacy, a healthy increase in the number of years kids stayed in school, a jump in the number of Afro-descendants who went to college – were not lost, despite the recession, despite the scandals and disillusionment with Mr. da Silva.
Instead of offering a salutary lesson in how to reduce inequality, I wrote then, Brazil turned out to be an illustration in just how devilishly difficult that is.
The development nerd in me was fascinated by this story, but the part of me that had come to love Brazil was further deflated.
Stephanie Nolen’s Brazil: More from our archives Brazil’s colour bind: How one of the world’s most diverse countries is just starting to talk about race.

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Summary of “The Glory of Otis, Fattest of the Fat Bears”

Fat Bear Week began as Fat Bear Tuesday, when Katmai employees printed before-and-after photos of some of the park’s 2,000-plus residents as they bulked up for hibernation.
Being on a peninsula of southern Alaska, the park doesn’t get many visitors-Zion National Park’s visitor count was more than 110 times Katmai’s in 2017-so Fat Bear Week helps the lower 48 really connect with the world’s largest protected population of brown bears.
“In the natural world, they’re probably gonna be among the fattest brown bears,” says Andrew LaValle, a park ranger at Katmai who’s been involved in Fat Bear Week since last year.
It’s where you can watch livestreams of all kinds of animals, but most important, in summer and early fall, you can watch seven different 24/7 streams of brown bears on Katmai’s Brooks River and its aptly named Dumpling Mountain, where many bears go to hibernate.
Fat Bear Week’s most hardcore fans are many of the same people who constantly populate the bear cam’s comment section and keep close tabs on the comings and goings of their favorite bears on Wikipedia-style fan pages.
Is really what Fat Bear Week is all about, because what else are you going to do with a reality show-style bear-watching experience? No other park has a Fat Bear Week, because most other parks don’t have 24/7 video surveillance of a particularly dedicated group of hunters at their favorite meal spot.
At a time when warming winters are keeping some bears up far past denning time and some urban bears stay up all winter eating literal garbage, Katmai’s bears live in rare, blissful ignorance.
One of the most popular videos of Otis on YouTube is titled “Bear 480 Otis slowly eats his fish.” It’s four minutes and 30 seconds of Otis slowly munching on a fish carcass, tearing off its red flesh in ribbons.

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