Summary of “The Legend of Nintendo”

Few people who play Nintendo games are likely to notice their fingerprints, though there are pious aficionados who vigilantly assess their work, bridling at signs of impurity like Tolstoy devotees picking over a new translation of War and Peace.
The only place to play Nintendo games was on Nintendo devices.
“If we think 20 years down the line, we may look back at the decision not to supply Nintendo games to smartphones and think that is the reason why the company is still here,” Satoru Iwata, then the company’s president, told the Wall Street Journal in 2013.
The following year, Niantic released Pokémon Go, a mobile game that thrust Nintendo back into the news.
More symptoms emerged in November, when the company released the NES Classic Edition, a miniaturized, rebooted version of the Nintendo Entertainment System, the console that had made the company a household name in Europe and America in the ’80s. The updated version was carefully calibrated to rekindle the latent passion of lapsed fans, with 30 of the most popular NES games built in.
At $59.99 per unit with no additional games, NES Classics were a low-margin item; much more important for the company was to whet the world’s appetite for Nintendo games in preparation for the Switch.
Nintendo has a few plans in motion: a partnership with Cygames Inc., a Japanese developer specializing in mobile games, and the launch in September of an online subscription service for the Switch, which will allow gamers to compete against one another and play a slate of retro titles.
In early June, Nintendo released a free online demo of the upcoming Mario Tennis Aces-a tournament game expected to be one of the first major attractions for its network service.

The orginal article.

Summary of “MMQB: Andrew Luck throwing, Mike McCarthy’s minicamp tradition”

“You gotta define the statement-‘limited time with players,'” McCarthy told me just before his last practice of the spring.
“From my viewpoint, the defining thing is it’s limited time with younger players. I’m of the opinion-and it started in 2016, and in a different form and fashion it started before that-that you get to a point in the offseason program where you’re trying to create more opportunities for your young players.”
The league in general has gotten younger, thanks in part to the reworked rookie salary scale, which means players have to be ready to play faster than ever, despite having less time to work than ever.
McCarthy says he’s seen the difference in his young quarterbacks and corners and pass-rushers, and with younger defensive players’ readiness to step into a signal-caller role.
“If you watch at the beginning of the season, games one through four, one through five, you look at the quality of play, it’s different from before. This is my opinion-it really is noticeable once you have injuries. And unfortunately, we’ve had injuries. When you start battling the injury component, and every team goes through it, now you’re playing younger players a little earlier than you’d like to.”
The result the coaches have seen is a locked-in starter who’s learning the ins and outs of every play call, rather than just going out and playing.
There is something of a domino effect at play here-if one player holds out then another will feel more comfortable following suit.
Pro Football Talk’s Mike Florio has tracked these arrests over the years, and he published some eye-opening numbers in 2016: There were just nine player arrests over the first half of that year, down from 13 in the first half of ’15, 21 over the first half of ’14, and 29 over the first half of ’13.

The orginal article.

Summary of “When should you retire? Don’t die at your desk, but don’t outlive your money either”

Fritz Gilbert knew in his 20s that he did not want to die at his desk.
“Every one of us is making a decision on retirement every day, in the way we live and spend our money,” Gilbert said.
Gilbert is a case study on how to mentally and financially ready yourself to retire.
Do something, she says, because “Dying at your desk is not a retirement plan.”
The rest of his investments are split between 60 percent stocks and 40 percent bonds, consistent with the playbook that most financial experts recommend for someone in his 50s and 60s. “Somewhere between 40 percent to 60 percent equities is a great place for most folks entering retirement age,” said David Blanchett, head of retirement research at Morningstar Investment Management.
“Assuming retirement is going to last 30 years, I think 70/30 stocks to bonds could be more aggressive.”
“It’s moving to a lower cost of living for retirement to allow retirement funds to stretch further.”
Gilbert is cruising into an affordable retirement that includes camping in national parks, fly-fishing, mountain biking, kayaking and his favorite – cold-water, long-distance swimming.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Climate Change Is Likely Killing Ancient Baobab Trees”

When trees are hollow, it’s usually because the wood inside them has died.
Baobab hollows were never filled; instead, these trees periodically produce new stems in the way that other trees sprout new branches.
Through this work, they also learned exactly how old these mythical trees can get.
The oldest tree that Patrut’s team studied-the Panke baobab from Zimbabwe-was more than 2,500 years old when it died in 2011.
The same can’t be said for the Platland tree, which was arguably the biggest and most visited baobab.
No one can say if baobabs have died off in this way in centuries past; these trees decay very quickly, and leave few traces behind.
“But when around 70 percent of your 1,500 to 2,000-year-old trees died within 12 years, it certainly is not normal,” says Erika Wise from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.
Although he originally suspected that Homasi was killed by a disease, none of the fallen trees have shown signs of infection, and the pattern of their deaths doesn’t fit with a spreading contagion.

The orginal article.

Summary of “End of Owning Music: How CDs, Downloads Died”

If you visited Austin’s Waterloo Records recently, you might have noticed a construction project that was unthinkable not so long ago: The 36-year-old Austin music staple was replacing 24 feet of CD racks with space for more vinyl.
“Whether they’re going back to vinyl, or streaming, people are selling off those CDs.”.
“It’s a streaming world and a vinyl world with a quickly diminishing CD,” says Daniel Glass, president of Glassnote Records, indie-label home of Mumford & Sons and Phoenix.
Jack White, arguably the most visible vinyl advocate in recent years, agrees: “I definitely believe the next decade is going to be streaming plus vinyl – streaming in the car and kitchen, vinyl in the living room and the den. Those will be the two formats. And I feel really good about that.”
. Who’s still buying CDs? “The Walmart customer,” says Glass, adding that sales are still strong in “Country, greatest-hits, soundtracks and baby records.” In the country world, Chris Stapleton’s second LP sold an impressive 373,000 physical releases last year.
CDs are also doing fine in some international markets – in Japan, where streaming has been slow to take off, 72 percent of last year’s music sales were physical.
A bulk order of 1,000 CDs costs about $1,000, while 200 vinyl LPs cost about $1,800.
“Vinyl is expensive,” says Kevin Breuner, marketing vice president for CD Baby, which helps artists sell and stream music independently.
White’s label, Third Man, recently opened its own pressing plant in Detroit with the first newly built vinyl presses in 35 years.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Antarctic ice loss has tripled in a decade. If that continues, we are in serious trouble.”

Antarctica’s ice sheet is melting at a rapidly increasing rate, now pouring more than 200 billion tons of ice into the ocean annually and raising sea levels a half-millimeter every year, a team of 80 scientists reported Wednesday.
Antarctica, the planet’s largest ice sheet, lost 219 billion tons of ice annually from 2012 through 2017 – approximately triple the 73 billion-ton melt rate of a decade ago, the scientists concluded.
The study is the product of a large group of Antarctic experts who collectively reviewed 24 recent measurements of Antarctic ice loss, reconciling their differences to produce the most definitive figures yet on changes in Antarctica.
The rapid, recent changes are almost entirely driven by the West Antarctic ice sheet, which scientists have long viewed as an Achilles’ heel.
In addition to West Antarctica, another increase in ice losses in the past decade came from the smaller glaciers of the Antarctic Peninsula, which are also melting rapidly but contain less potential to raise the sea level.
A single East Antarctic glacier, Totten, has the potential to unleash as much total sea-level rise as the entire West Antarctic ice sheet, or more.
Scientists have previously raised fears about a scenario in which ice loss from Antarctica takes on an explosive rate.
A key Antarctic glacier just lost a huge piece of ice – the latest sign of its worrying retreat.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The podcast business is still small. Which is great news for podcasts.”

It’s sort of nuts to imagine a time before podcasts, right? Podcasts are the future.
More precisely: Advertisers put $314 million into podcast ads in the U.S. last year.
That’s from a new study from the Interactive Advertising Bureau, which takes self-reported revenues from podcast companies like Gimlet and Midroll Media and then extrapolates to get a full-market estimate.
Podcast enthusiasts – that includes me, per above – will point out that the podcast industry’s very, very modest revenues are increasing rapidly.
So you don’t need to generate a ton of revenue to make podcasting a viable business.
Don’t tell anyone, but one of the reasons podcasts are fun to listen to is because the podcast ad business is so tiny.
Measuring podcast audiences is still a work in progress, and there’s no good way for advertisers to automate their ad buys across lots of podcasts.
If that changes, you may well see podcast advertising move much faster – but it also means podcast advertising will be more unpleasant.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Seahawks Rebuild on Pete Carroll’s Competition Mantra”

In the team meeting room, each player gets up from the seats they were in the year before and finds a new spot around different people.
Kam Chancellor is awaiting scans on his neck to see if he’ll be able to play.
Here’s the curveball: The roster turnover, the departure of all those core players, has actually made it easier for Carroll.
We’re going to share details on a visit Kobe Bryant took to Foxboro in May. The Kobe visit was an interesting one, because of Bryant’s experience as an athlete who played 20 professional seasons.
“We want to turn the page on that as fast as we can. Obviously we can’t get the taste out of our mouth until we start playing football games. We all know that and we respect that. But to talk about it, what does that do? It doesn’t do anything but bring up bad memories. We’ve pushed forward from that.”
“That’s the way John’s approached it. I know it’s the way our coaching staff has approached it. We want to get to winning as soon as we can, and the moves signal that. Tyrod Taylor’s our starting quarterback, we drafted a rookie quarterback, and I think it’s a great situation to be in-we don’t have to play a rookie quarterback right away, because we have a proven guy who’s played in the league, won games, played in playoff games. That’s exciting. I also think it sends a message, creates a narrative that this team is gearing up to win, that everything we’re doing is pointing towards winning.”
Among Bryant’s talking points was the importance of training, and of studying other players, to his ability to play two decades in the NBA. The Patriots who were listening have another pretty good example of longevity in their own locker room, and they made the connection quickly.
I’ll never blame a football player in that situation for trying to leverage a team.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Financial Crimes That Fueled Brazil’s Inhotim Museum”

Paz believes beauty changes lives, and, perhaps because he lets the poor in for free, he’s called Inhotim “a factory of citizens” and “The greatest social project anyone in the world has ever done.” He’s also called himself a socialist, and scoffs at the ostentation of other rich people with their yachts and private jets.
Inhotim began as an unintended consequence of Paz’s 1980s takeover spree.
As soon as Paz moved on, an Inhotim curator stayed behind to cancel the sales, explaining that he was trailing Paz to “Unbuy” impulsive purchases.
Not long after Inhotim opened, a series of government investigations began uncovering the environmental and labor violations that had helped Paz build his fortune-and then the financial crimes that had shielded his fortune from taxation.
The investigators focused on a holding company called Horizontes that Paz had formed to administer Inhotim.
Allegedly, Paz used some of the money going through Horizontes to buy land for Inhotim and transferred some to his other companies, ordering employees to cash checks for as much as 500,000 reais at a time.
Paz started buying the work of Brazilian artist Miguel Rio Branco in the ’90s. The conversations they had helped inspire Inhotim’s creation, and today the museum has a whole building to display Rio Branco’s color-saturated photographs of humble Brazilians.
Up in northern Minas Gerais, Dias says he’d never even heard of Inhotim until his legal battles with Paz.

The orginal article.

Summary of “My First Drive After Cancer”

Half a mile from home, on my very first drive since my doctor forbade me from getting behind the wheel a month previously, I was cut off while in the middle of a wide right turn.
While dealing with muscle cramps that felt like they might break bones or running out of breath after climbing just three steps, everyone tells you you have the “Easy” cancer.
This cancer, which you statistically shouldn’t have in the first place, is quite curable, they say.
It’s the “Good” cancer and you’re “Lucky.”
Every time I was sick this past year, doctors had to check for more cancer.
Who could blame me? In the last year, I’ve been scanned for lung cancer, bone cancer and uterine cancer on top of thyroid cancer follow ups.
Due to having a rarer form of thyroid cancer, mine was caught later and more likely to spread. While I’m always told the odds are good I don’t have more cancer, that’s what I was told about my thyroid.
My latest scan came up clear for thyroid cancer, so I’m now technically in remission, but I’ll need to be rescanned every year for the next three or four years.

The orginal article.