Summary of “When Cops Become Robbers”

In the course of testimony, the names of an additional 11 current and former Baltimore city police officers came out, including a former partner of Jenkins’ and a high-ranking deputy commissioner.
According to a spokesman, new checks and balances will be implemented to make sure gun cases are tracked from “Arrest to adjudication”, and an anti-corruption unit will be established to focus specifically on the misconduct of the Gun Trace Task Force officers.
Critics have questioned how an investigative unit housed within the BPD will be any different than the current Internal Affairs division, which failed to root out the GTTF officers.
After years of fighting for the right to view officers’ Internal Affairs files, Deborah Katz Levi, in charge of the public defender’s special litigation projects, says that a month after the end of the trial she’s suddenly been granted “Unparalleled access” to 21 officers’ files, including some members of the GTTF. Levi says they’re now working with the State’s Attorney’s Office to expand the number of convictions “That need to be undone”.
The office says their initial assessment concluded that 284 cases – active or closed – have been affected by the seven originally indicted GTTF officers.
Mosby’s office will only proceed on three active cases.
“The has shared components of its GTTF investigation with our office and we are not at liberty to comment,” Mosby’s spokeswoman wrote.
Among Baltimore citizens and police officers alike, there is sharp disagreement on how Sean Suiter died.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The University Is Fake. The Laughs Are Real.”

While the original perpetrators were eventually discovered by the N.C.A.A., which gives away tickets only to legitimate schools, a club was formed to keep the Final Four trips alive.
The members maintained the university theme – Maguire has a chancellor, an admissions director, a dean of its nonexistent law school and a coach of its nonexistent swim team – and enrollment has swelled to more than 1,000, at least according to the email list.
Four trips to the Final Four with Maguire are considered enough to graduate, with a degree in bracketology and a minor in intoxicology.
Still more were here for other, more social reasons.
Though they call themselves the Jollymen, Maguire officials and graduates finally ceded to Title IX in 2003 and began accepting women, like Comer, who serves as treasurer.
There are no dues, but there is tuition, which goes toward financing the annual Final Four pilgrimage, which this year ran around $2,000 for a five-night hotel stay.
Kurek, a member of the Maguire hall of fame making his 25th straight Final Four trip, was sitting next to Charlie Hounihan, a Loyola graduate who remembers watching the 1963 team in action.
They both live in Chicago and frequently attend Kelly’s Pub, which replaced Maguire’s as the main campus in 1988.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Fresh voices: 50 writers you should read now”

Mark O’ConnellO’Connell’s captivating book about transhumanism and “Solving the problem of death”, To Be a Machine, which saw him navigate some of the stranger byways of Silicon Valley, was shortlisted for the Baillie Gifford prize, the Royal Society science book prize and recently the Wellcome prize.
Reni Eddo-LodgeEddo-Lodge’s debut book Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race, published last year, has recently won the Jhalak prize – it was praised by the judges as a “Clarion call for action”, which “Not only holds up a mirror to contemporary Britain but also serves as a warning”.
His ambitious debut book New Dark Age comes out in July.
His ambitious debut book, New Dark Age, which argues that the digital era is radically shifting the boundaries of human experience, is out in July.
Nick DrnasoThe Illinois native picked up an LA Times book prize for his excellent 2016 debut, Beverly, a series of sad and lyrical interconnected stories.
Her second book, Force of Nature, which features the same investigator and concerns an elemental battle for survival in the unforgiving Australian wilderness, lives up to the promise of her stunning debut.
His first book for children, My Brother Is a Superhero, is subtitled “I could have been one too, except I needed a wee”; the story of comic geek Luke and his older brother Zack, unfairly given superpowers by a visiting alien, it won the Waterstones prize for children’s fiction in 2016, and its two sequels have since been flying off the shelves.
Her most recent book, Testosterone Rex, won the Royal Society science book of the year prize in 2017.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Student Loans Are Too Expensive To Forgive”

The federal government is considering ending some of its student loan forgiveness programs, which could raise the economic barrier to entering certain public service professions and leave social workers, teachers and other people in public-service fields that require graduate degrees paying thousands of dollars more for their education.
President Trump’s Education Department and its inspector general, as well as lawmakers and think tanks of all ideological stripes, have raised concerns about the growing cost of the federal government’s student loan programs – specifically its loan forgiveness options for graduate students.
A new audit from the Department of Education’s inspector general found that between fiscal years 2011 and 2015, the cost of programs that allow student borrowers to repay their federal loans at a rate proportional to their income shot up from $1.4 billion to $11.5 billion.
The federal government currently offers several types of loans, with varying repayment terms, one of which can cover up to the full cost of a student’s graduate program.
A Georgetown Law grad who’s gunning for a job at a U.S. attorney’s office and enrolled in the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program would expect that the federal student loans she took out to help pay her $180,000 tuition will be forgiven after 10 years.
If, like the typical lawyer, she graduates with $140,000 in federal student loan debt and her salary rises from $59,000 to $121,000 a year over her first 10 years on the job, she could have the government wipe out $147,000 in debt – the full remaining principal of her debt plus interest – according to a 2014 study from the think tank New America, which Delisle co-authored.
Ending the option of having student loans forgiven also removes a bargaining chip for graduate programs that have a reputation for supporting public service careers, like Georgetown University’s Law Center.
If the PROSPER Act passes, rather than paying 10 percent of her discretionary income for 10 years and having $147,000 in federal student loan debt forgiven, she would have to choose from one of the two repayment plans it allows.

The orginal article.

Summary of “IV ‘Normal Saline’: A Medical Habit”

IV ‘Normal Saline’: A Medical Habit : Shots – Health News IV bags filled with what’s called normal saline are used to treat problems ranging from vomiting to lightheadedness.
IV fluids are among the most common medical interventions worldwide.
Ringer’s solution was slow to catch on and a simpler salt solution known as normal saline became the de facto IV fluid of the early 20th century.
Amazingly, the ascendance of normal saline as the default IV fluid seems to have been based solely on Hamburger’s early experiments.
The following year, researchers at Duke found that sepsis patients had a 3 percent increase in mortality when treated with saline rather than balanced fluids.
With colleagues at Vanderbilt, Semler studied 15,000 ICU patients randomly assigned to receive normal saline or balanced fluids like lactated Ringer’s, and found that those in the latter group did a bit better.
“For every 100 patients treated with balanced fluids instead of saline, 1 less patient would experience death, new dialysis, or persistent renal problems.”
“Because tens of millions of patients receive these fluids every year in the United States, just shifting the default from normal saline to balanced fluids has the potential to change outcomes for huge numbers of patients,” he said, “Much more so than most new blockbuster drugs.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Microsoft is ready for a world beyond Windows”

“We want to move from people needing Windows to choosing Windows, to loving Windows. That is our bold goal,” said Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella three years ago.
It was an exciting time of opportunity and optimism that had Microsoft betting on people loving Windows so much that Windows 10 would be running on 1 billion devices within three years.
The core development of Windows is being moved to a cloud and AI team, and a new team will take over the “Experiences” Windows 10 users see like apps, the Start menu, and new features.
Microsoft’s own Windows trends show that Windows 10 was running on 45 percent of all PCs and tablets back in November, meaning overall Windows usage might actually have slipped to 1.33 billion.
Universal Windows Apps were supposed to be the future of Windows across multiple devices, but they’ve largely flopped without a widely used mobile operating system to run on.
Windows 10 has been an impressive return to form from the controversial release of Windows 8.
Nadella says “The future of Windows is bright,” but in the same sentence he says Microsoft will “More deeply” connect Windows to its Microsoft 365 offering.
Now that Microsoft has moved the fundamental core of Windows over to the cloud team, it’s easy to see the long-term future of Windows being a cloud subscription service for the people who really need to use it, rather than love using it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tesla Looked Like the Future. Now Some Ask if It Has One.”

Tesla shares dropped 8 percent on Tuesday and another 8 percent Wednesday, and though they regained ground Thursday, they have lost almost a quarter of their value in less than three weeks.
A Tesla representative declined to comment on the company’s finances.
Federal investigators are looking into a fiery crash that killed a Tesla driver last week in California, including the possibility that Autopilot was in use.
On Thursday, Tesla said it was recalling 123,000 Model S cars made before April 2016 to replace bolts that hold a power-steering motor in place.
For years, Tesla has ridden a wave of enthusiastic support from its customers and a certain set of investors, even though it generated barely any profit in the 15 years since its founding.
There’s no doubt Tesla has achieved some breakthroughs that have left the established automakers scrambling to catch up.
Along the way, Mr. Musk has also courted controversy, including his move in 2016 for Tesla to take over SolarCity, a maker of home solar panels run by his cousin.
In January, Tesla gave Mr. Musk a new compensation plan tied entirely to the company’s market value and other performance goals.

The orginal article.

Summary of “MLB Preview 2018: The Yankees Are Just a Better Version of the Red Sox”

We’re at a curious point in that rivalry right now because the Red Sox have had the upper hand over the past five years: three division titles and a World Series, while the Yankees ended a four-year division-series drought just last year.
That doesn’t mean the Red Sox, who won 93 games both years, weren’t very good themselves, but sometimes you run into a better or hotter team.
Last year’s Yankees won 91 games and finished with a plus-198 run differential: better than the Astros and Dodgers-and better than the Red Sox by 81 runs.
Even though they won fewer games, you could argue that the Yankees were better than the Red Sox last year.
The Red Sox ought to win 90-odd games for a third straight year.
Too, the Yankees: Their best two position players last year and best pitcher were all homegrown.
The Yankees have been either first or second in payroll every year since 2000, the first year for which Cot’s Contracts has data.
Once you factor that in, the Red Sox should be just as concerned about staying ahead of their wild-card rivals-distant though they may be-as they are with keeping up with the Yankees.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Will Our Society Look Like When Artificial Intelligence Is Everywhere?”

Hedge funds are using AI to beat the stock market, Google is utilizing it to diagnose heart disease more quickly and accurately, and American Express is deploying AI bots to serve its customers online.
This AI “Takeoff,” also known as the singularity, will likely see AI pull even with human intelligence and then blow past it in a matter of days.
“AIs will colonize and transform the entire cosmos,” says Juergen Schmidhuber, a pioneering computer scientist based at the Dalle Molle Institute for Artificial Intelligence in Switzerland, “And they will make it intelligent.”
As a novelist, I wanted to plot out what the AI future might actually look like, using interviews with more than a dozen futurists, philosophers, scientists, cultural psychiatrists and tech innovators.
Once you made the decision to leave him, your AI negotiated with your soon-to-be ex-husband’s AI, wrote the divorce settlement, then “Toured” a dozen apartments on the cloud before finding the right one for you to begin your single life.
You read a fresh Austen work every month, then spend hours talking to your AI about your favorite characters-and the AI’s.
There will be Christian, Muslim and Orthodox Jewish districts in cities such as Lagos and Phoenix and Jerusalem, places where people live in a time before AI, where they drive their cars and allow for the occasional spurt of violence, things almost unknown in the full AI zones.
In Lagos, “Civil rights” drones fly over police pods as they race to the scene of a crime-one AI watching over another AI, for the protection of humankind.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 100 million city: is 21st century urbanisation out of control?”

Overstretched Cities is an in-depth look at how urbanisation has seen cities all over the world mushroom in size, putting new strain on infrastructure and resources – but in some cases offering hope for a more sustainable relationship with the natural world.
If Nigeria’s population continues to grow and people move to cities at the same rate as now, Lagos could become the world’s largest metropolis, home to 85 or 100 million people.
Under the researchers’ extreme scenario – where countries are unable to control fertility rates and urbanisation continues apace – within 35 years more than 100 cities will have populations larger than 5.5 million people.
All the projections below are based on Hoornweg and Pope’s research paper Population predictions for the world’s largest cities in the 21st century.
Bangalore is the worst city in the world for unchecked urbanisation.
Today it has possibly 12 million and is predicted to be Africa’s second largest city with 75 million people inside 50 years.
In just 30 years, nearly 500 million people have moved from rural areas into China’s 622 main cities, and a predominantly rural country has become nearly 60% urban.
“Planning and thinking was geared to the idea that cars could circulate. Only 30% of Mexico City has a car, but the city was designed for the car. The 19th-century sanitary revolution has to be rethought. The environmental impacts of urbanisation are much worse outside cities.”

The orginal article.