Summary of “Quanta Magazine”

They’re creating a single mathematical model that unites years of biological experiments and explains how the brain produces elaborate visual reproductions of the world based on scant visual information.
They’ve explained how neurons in the visual cortex interact to detect the edges of objects and changes in contrast, and now they’re working on explaining how the brain perceives the direction in which objects are moving.
Previous efforts to model human vision made wishful assumptions about the architecture of the visual cortex.
The retina is connected to the visual cortex, the part of the brain in the back of the head. However, there’s very little connectivity between the retina and the visual cortex.
For a visual area roughly one-quarter the size of a full moon, there are only about 10 nerve cells connecting the retina to the visual cortex.
LGN cells send a pulse to the visual cortex when they detect a change from dark to light, or vice versa, in their tiny section of the visual field.
For every 10 LGN neurons that snake back from the retina, there are 4,000 neurons in just the initial “Input layer” of the visual cortex – and many more in the rest of it.
All previous efforts assumed that more information travels between the retina and the cortex – an assumption that would make the visual cortex’s response to stimuli easier to explain.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NBA Young Core Rankings”

Basketball is a tricky sport to quantify completely, and particularly with young players, projections come with sizable error bars; that uncertainty only compounds over multiple years and across the multiple players who make up a roster.
Knox in particular stands out in a negative way: He projects as the worst NBA player over the next five seasons, with a befuddling minus-11.6 WAR. That assessment might seem harsh, but among 120 qualifying players last season, Knox had the worst true-shooting percentage.
Poeltl and Dejounte Murray are the best young Spurs but rank just 32nd and 35th, respectively, among all young players in five-year projected WAR. The Spurs could really use a breakout from the likes of Murray or Lonnie Walker IV or Derrick White to pass the franchise’s competitive torch.
The 76ers are a veteran team with possibly the best starting five in the NBA, so after Simmons-who projects as the best U25 player in the whole league-they’re really just hoping that a couple of their untested young players stick as useful bench pieces.
Beyond Porzingis, who is under investigation for rape and hasn’t played an NBA game since tearing his ACL in February 2018, the Dallas roster is mostly populated with veteran players.
New Orleans isn’t just the Zion Show: The Pelicans have more young depth than any other team in the NBA. Beyond the trio listed above, Brandon Ingram, Jaxson Hayes, and Nickeil Alexander-Walker all project as rotation players, and more players will join them in the coming years thanks to New Orleans’s numerous future first-round picks.
As befits a good young team, Denver won’t hope just for continued incremental improvements from last season’s key players.
Neither player projects to do much per CARMELO-but if just one overcomes his injury risks to reach his full basketball-playing potential, Denver’s crop of young players will rise even higher.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Teen Girl Activists Take On Skeptical Boys, Annoying Buzzwords”

In her home country, girls are often married young and may be discouraged from going to school.
As Ayesha says, “If that’s making your girls bad, please, can I make your girls bad?”.
Ayesha was one of ten young activists NPR interviewed at the Girl Up 2019 Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., this week.
Girl Up is a campaign founded by the U.N. foundation that promotes activism for 13- to 22-year-olds to work for the health, safety and education of girls.
Here’s what young activists are talking about this year.
“My own brother told me when I was going to senior high school that science is not for girls and that I should pursue something much more girl-like, like the liberal arts. He told me that I am likely to be a failure or probably always be at the bottom of the class because it’s very unnatural to see girls doing so well in school. I said, that’s not true. We’ve seen other women across the continents in other places make it. And I told him, I’m going to go to school and do science, and when I finish I’m going to medical school. And I can say that I was always at the top of my class.”
Paola Moreno-Roman, 29, Lima, Peru.”A lot of activists are passionate about things because we truly believe in them. But for most of us it comes from events that we went through when we were younger and that fuels and gives us energy. But I forget that there are things that we went through that we actually never addressed that we just shoved under the bed and just don’t like looking at it because it’s painful.” For her, therapy is helpful: “It goes along the lines of speaking to your friends, because if not, it can be a very lonely journey. Sometimes it just feels like you are the only one who cares. And that’s the loneliest feeling ever.”
“I think my girl here will be Sor Juana ; she’s a poet. She started creating poetry and art to be outspoken on issues that women were facing at that time. One specific poem talked about how men back then said that women were the ones creating their own problems. For her, it was like, how are we creating prostitution when it’s men creating demand for it? Or how do you say it’s women who are not successful when we can’t get an education?”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How millennials replaced religion with astrology and crystals”

How millennials replaced religion with astrology and crystals – Los Angeles Times.
She’s one of a growing number of young people – largely millennials, though the trend extends to younger Gen Xers, now cresting 40, and down to Gen Z, the oldest of whom are freshly minted college grads – who have turned away from traditional organized religion and are embracing more spiritual beliefs and practices like tarot, astrology, meditation, energy healing and crystals.
Today, young people still seek the things that traditional organized religion may have provided for their parents or grandparents: religious beliefs, yes, but also a sense of community, guidance, purpose and meaning.
One of the big draws for younger people about spiritual practices is the ability to “Pick and choose,” said Jim Burklo, a progressive Christian reverend who works with college students as the senior associate dean of the Office of Religious and Spiritual Life at USC. Spiritual practices appeal to the commitment-wary: You can get a little into crystals or astrology or tarot, or a lot into it.
Astrologer Chani Nicholas said social media has helped guide the way for a lot of young people.
Young people have grown up contending with a major recession, climate change and a more general awareness of seeing a political and economic system that many feel hasn’t benefited them, Nicholas said, so it’s not surprising that they’re pushing back against those systems at the same time they’re exploring nontraditional religious beliefs and finding ways to integrate it all.
In the past three or four years, business has exploded with people in their 20s and 30s. “The younger crowd is definitely our full force, especially on Instagram,” Vargas said.
The majority of people who attend her classes are women in their 20s and 30s. She said she’s noticed a shift in millennials and Gen Zers being willing to embrace – or at least try out – alternative practices like hers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Teen founded nonprofit to bring STEM to ‘Murdertown, USA'”

There are small cups of chemicals like borax and up front, a ringmaster in the form of a 16-year-old girl: Jacqueline Means, known locally as the STEM Queen.
Means gives the assembled girls a rundown of their day and briefly explains what science experiments she has in store for them.
Means says she aims to show the girls that STEM is exciting, fun, and most importantly, accessible to them.
Two years ago, Means founded the Wilmington Urban STEM Initiative, a non-profit organization dedicated to bringing STEM to underserved girls of Wilmington, a city that has earned the nickname “Murdertown, U.S.A.” for high rates of violent crime.
A shooting had taken place across the street from their home and JoAnn, Means’ mother, wasn’t taking any chances.
Means developed an interest in science from a young age, after her parents gave her a science kit around age 9.
She essentially created the option she wished she’d had. “I decided to start my own STEM initiative and program because I wanted kids in Wilmington to have the same opportunities that other kids often get,” Means says.
Means is graduating from high school next year, and plans on using her passion for STEM at Princeton University or the University of Delaware.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The very best summer reading books for kids.”

Got an awkward middle schooler on your hands? He should read these books.
In real life, our kids feel the pull of Fortnite and rebuke our summer reading prompts, subconsciously considering it “Homework.” Not to mention we parents can be at a loss for quality book recommendations powerful enough to truly lure our kids into another world.
So we’ve gone to the experts to bring you a list of books that will captivate your young reader this summer.
Chris Grabenstein, bestselling author of the Mr. Lemoncello series Back in the 1960s, when I was the same age as the majority of my readers we didn’t read books in school.
So my love of reading and writing didn’t come from children’s books.
I knew rationally, of course, that Sara’s life was nothing like mine, yet Burnett had created a character I yearned to be, living out a fantasy I didn’t know I had. How did Burnett know so much about me? Every day when I sit down to write, I hope I can give an 11-year-old this same deep reading pleasure that books like A Little Princess gave to me.
Grace Lin, award-winning author of novels like Where the Mountain Meets the Moon, as well as picture books like A Big Mooncake for Little Star Many books have shaped me, but the first one that comes to mind is Anne of Green Gables.
Matt De La Peña, award-winning author of children’s and young adult books like Mexican WhiteBoy I wasn’t a big reader as a kid.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I Took ‘Adulting Classes’ for Millennials”

Luckily, the rough road to adulthood can be paved with adulting classes.
The Adulting Collective, a startup venture out of Portland, Maine, made a big splash about two years ago after national news outlets reported on its in-person events.
“Adulting is something nobody prepares you for, but you know it when it happens. It’s the unglorified part of being on your own,” says Rebekah Fitzsimmons, assistant director of the writing and communication program at Georgia Tech who taught a class on adulting in the 21st century in 2016.In a bygone era, the ordinariness traditionally associated with growing the hell up was something few noticed-in the first half of the 20th century, 20-somethings were too busy trying not to die of the Spanish Flu or fighting Hitler to worry too much about what life skills they were failing to develop.
At the intersection of these two competing truths is the cottage industry of adulting, one nurtured by Instagram hashtags and built around how-to classes for hapless Millennials.
How hapless am I? To find out, I signed up for the two action challenges the Adulting Collective offered last fall: one on nutrition and another focused on monthly budgeting.
The crash course in nutrition from the Adulting Collective that arrived in my inbox last fall was titled “Detox Before You Retox,” and it heavily emphasized hangover avoidance.
The Adulting Collective doesn’t rely solely on Weinstein’s expertise for its courses, although it appears that designing an adulting curriculum is just as much of a challenge as growing up.
The most useful takeaways from my own brush with the adulting industry involved money management.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Inside the dark, daunting art of the NBA’s toughest position”

“Dame just threw him like a piece of trash, and it was obvious,” said Clippers assistant Sam Cassell, who works most closely with the rookie on the dark arts of being an NBA point guard.
In recent years, as the NBA has accelerated into a constant offensive assault, the position of point guard has been transformed.
Gilgeous-Alexander orchestrated an improbable playoff run with a roster largely filled with a combo of vets and rookies, and Young anchored a young nucleus during a classic rebuild.
Young had sampled a taste for three quarters of what exerting his will over a meaningful game feels like in the NBA. “I mean, you’re managing a game in college,” Young says, with “Managing” effectively in air quotes.
There’s another point guard Gilgeous-Alexander and Young each independently cited when asked if there were active players in the league whom they studied closely for the kinds of secrets, hacks and shortcuts that you can conceive of only by observing firsthand: Mike Conley.
Though he wasn’t furnished with Young’s quote or choice of language, Conley said the single most important detail to grasp in his maturation of the position was “Learning how to control a game.”
Young faced up against Conley in his second career NBA game, and he marvels at just how Conley seems almost telepathic in reading defenses.
Virtually every point guard hides a weakness – Gilgeous-Alexander will never have Russell Westbrook’s first step, and Young’s size and frame make him a vulnerable defender.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Hard Lessons of Dianne Feinstein’s Encounter with the Young Green New Deal Activists”

One imagines that Senator Dianne Feinstein would like a do-over of her colloquy with some young people on Friday afternoon.
A group of school students, at least one as young as seven, went to the senator’s San Francisco office to ask her to support the Green New Deal climate legislation.
When the group persists in supporting the Green New Deal, which was introduced by Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Feinstein responds, “You know what’s interesting about this group? I’ve been doing this for thirty years. I know what I’m doing. You come in here and you say, ‘It has to be my way or the highway.’ I don’t respond to that. I’ve gotten elected, I just ran, I was elected by almost a million-vote plurality,” she continued.
Feinstein was demonstrating why climate change exemplifies an issue on which older people should listen to the young.
The kids whom Feinstein was talking to are going to be dealing with climate chaos for the rest of their lives, as any Californian who has lived through the past few years of drought, flood, and fire must recognize.
Feinstein’s condescension, though it’s less jarring in the video of the full encounter, which also shows gracious moments-including one when she offers a young person an internship-echoed that of Nancy Pelosi, from earlier this month, when the Speaker of the House talked about “The green dream, or whatever they call it. Nobody knows what it is, but they’re for it, right?”.
If we’d moved thirty years ago, moderate steps of the kind that Feinstein proposes would have been enough to change our trajectory.
“You didn’t vote for me,” Feinstein said to one of the young people in her office.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Word Collector”

The Settlement began with eighty acres that Young Bear’s great-great grandfather, Ma mi nwa ni ke, helped to secure from the governments of Iowa and the United States in 1856.
Though he’s lived the totality of his life on the Settlement, Young Bear did spend a few semesters at Pomona College in southern California during the late ’60s. He landed there after they offered him a $30/month stipend based on a poem he wrote in high school.
Young Bear, freshly sixty-eight years old, is just as much a Baby Boomer as a member of the Meskwaki Tribe.
The notion of identity is paramount in Young Bear’s work.
Many of his poems begin buried as dream fragments, remembered and eventually saddle-stitched together over time, like “The Lone Swimmer of Henry County, Virginia,” and “The Three Brothers, 1999.” Over the last two decades, Young Bear employed a La-Z-Boy recliner as a “Spirit guide.” “I would break that La-Z-Boy down and start thinking about stuff. I could feel it rock two or three inches each way. What the hell is it?” he said.
Through his work, Ray Young Bear is preserving a language and a culture in his mind, and transcribing those sounds and signs into English, his second language.
Later, as we were walking through the casino parking lot to leave, Young Bear pointed out a late ’90s model Ford Ranger and said, “I want something like this. You’ll see why.”
The work ended just before the Settlement started, yellow Caterpillars waiting to trudge west-yet another of Young Bear’s visions that had come in some way true.

The orginal article.