Summary of “5 Ways to Respond to Ageism in a Job Interview”

Despite the negative stereotypes that older workers have less energy and are less productive, the data shows otherwise.
According to research from the Stanford Center on Longevity, older workers are healthy, have a strong work ethic, are loyal to their employers, and are more likely to be satisfied with their jobs than their younger coworkers.
Show your excitement about the opportunity and the work you do.
Instead of discussing how many years of experience you have, or how many times you’ve done a certain type of project, show your enthusiasm for the job by saying something like, “This is my sweet spot. This is the work I love to do.” Calling out all of your years of experience can have the unintended consequence of alienating or intimidating your interviewer, or making you appear to be a know-it-all.
In finding ways to connect personally with her interviewer, Lauren made sure to use current references that a younger person could relate to, like a popular show on Netflix.
Humor is another way to connect and show the other person you’d be enjoyable to work with.
Show your ability to work well with diverse groups of people.
While ageism exists, focusing on what you can control and employing the strategies above can divert attention from your age and refocus it on why you are right for the job.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I Want My 2.3 Bonus Years”

If there is any truth to her claim, maybe it’s because men know they can settle down at a later age.
A study that tracked 8,559 pregnancies found that “Conception during a 12-month period was 30 percent less likely for men over age 40 years as compared with men younger than age 30 years.”
In other words, all that data we have about how women in their late 30s are struggling to get pregnant doesn’t take into consideration the fact that many of those women are trying to conceive with men who are in their 40s. Men are much less fooled when it comes to that second belief – that they could get a younger woman if they wanted to.
The dating site’s researchers found that most conversations take place between an older man and a younger woman and in almost half of them, the age gap is at least five years.
Men might still be mistaken about just how much younger their next partner could be.
When New York magazine looked at the careers of 10 leading men, it found that as they aged, their onscreen love interests didn’t.
We are socialized into thinking that men are like wine, they get better with time.
I hereby swear that I will not take an eligible older man out of the dating pool – to do so would be to slap future-me in the face but it would also signal to men my age that it’s O.K., you have time.

The orginal article.