Summary of “How to Figure Out How Much Influence You Have at Work”

Informal power – which is unrelated to your formal title – can enable you to mobilize resources, drive change, and create value for the organization as well as yourself.
Approximate how much value you offer your contacts and how difficult it would be to replace you.
Do all of your contacts work in one team, function, product unit, or office building? This could indicate a limited ability to generate value beyond the basic requirements of your job description.
Do your contacts provide you with more value than you return? Such relationships are difficult to sustain in the long run.
Is all of the value you give or receive concentrated in a couple of contacts? You could be vulnerable if you lose these contacts or your relationship changes.
First of all, a prime way to rectify unfavorable power audit scores is to earn relationships by delivering value to your contacts.
Ask yourself: what value can you deliver to them? One way is to develop and continuously improve upon a skill set that leads others to value your contributions.
You may be surprised how something that is rather easy for you to do carries significant value for them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to stop overthinking your decisions”

Morin dedicates an entire chapter of her book to the problem of overthinking, and although she says women tend to overthink decisions more than men do, ruminating on a decision has the same negative impacts on both genders.
To avoid over-ruminating about a decision, give yourself a time frame to think about it.
One of the problems overthinkers often face is thinking about their problems all day long, or at inopportune times, such as during an important meeting.
If thoughts about the issue creep into your brain before your scheduled thinking time, telling yourself “No, I’m going to think about that after dinner, not during this meeting” can help you to push those thoughts away, knowing you’ll come back to it later.
While for most of us, overthinking stems from a fear of the consequences of taking action A or B, Morin says those who are chronic overthinkers often believe that they can solve a problem by continuing to pound away, thinking about it.
While dwelling on a problem, thinking “This is horrible, I can’t handle this” or rehashing things that happened in the past are an unproductive use of your time, thinking about what steps you can take to improve the situation or actively thinking of a solution to the problem are helpful toward moving forward.
Becoming aware of when your thinking is unhelpful and when it’s actively problem solving can help you to ensure your time spent thinking isn’t just adding to your stress.
You know the expression “Sleeping on a problem,” well, that’s because sometimes we’re better at solving a problem when we’re not thinking about it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Self-Reliance Is The Secret Sauce To Consistent Happiness”

Even though the purpose of life is not happiness in my opinion, being happy is still something that’s important to us.
When we become adults we should become self-reliant individuals, but funnily enough, we become even more dependent on others.
Otherwise, you become a dependent robot who can’t function by itself.
What you will find next are 6 lessons that can help you to become emotionally self-reliant.
How often do you think or feel something and you’re afraid of speaking it? We feel that we always have to agree with everything and everyone.
It’s always harder to speak your mind and to stand for something.
Once you separate yourself from everything in life, you become a passenger who tries to make the most out of every single minute.
If one thing falls through, don’t worry, do something else with your precious time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “19 Reasons You Did Not Achieve Any of Your Goals This Year”

You had all the energy and commitment and believed the year couldn’t possibly end without you hitting all your goals.
Here are 19 possible reasons why you couldn’t achieve your goals this year.1.
Learn what other people do to finish what they start, and apply those strategies in 2019 to achieve your own goals.
You launch into the year without a concrete, written-down plan of your goals and ways to achieve them.
The result is no achieved goals at the end of the year.
If you failed to achieve a goal last year, why would you do the same thing to try to achieve it this year? Working harder won’t make a difference if you don’t change your approach.
Acting on your goals is the only factor that’ll set you apart from those who don’t achieve their dreams.
It’s a good thing for you to set new goals for the coming year.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Develop Better Habits in 2019”

Just about everyone wants to cultivate better habits.
The problem is, very few of us want to do the work to make those habits a reality.
To start, I need to develop better habits, better accountability, and a clearer vision for my day-to-day life.
Piggyback New Habits on Old HabitsIn 2018, I kept telling myself I wanted to contribute more to my community or be of more service.
If you want to have better habits, find better friends.
If you want to have better habits this year, find a challenge you can participate in.
It’s a huge advantage to cultivate certain habits or commitments that are foundational to your identity.
Their habits require habits! No wonder they don’t make progress.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ask Polly: ‘I Will Never Be Who I Want to Be'”

That’s honestly how I feel right now – like all my sneaking feelings of being an impostor, of not being smart enough or strong enough or confident enough to get what I want in life, are becoming demonstrably true, and not just in my head any longer.
I come back to feeling like I’m drowning and I just want to run away.
Every time you stare down the barrel of your heavy workload, you say to yourself, “I am bad at this job. I will fall behind.” Every time you feel tired or overwhelmed or bored, you say, “I feel these things because I’m an impostor, I’m lazy, I’m weak.” Every time you exercise, you say, “This won’t help that much, and I won’t stick with it anyway.” Every time you imagine quitting your job, you say, “I only want to quit because I’m pathetic; I’m an escapist and a quitter at heart.”
You need to notice that you don’t JUST feel guilty for not working hard, you also feel guilty for NOT WANTING to work hard when you ARE working hard.
So I often ask him, “Do you really want to spend time on that, or could you just relax instead?” I’ve been pushing both of us to define work and relaxation in clearer terms.
This is where you land when you’ve spent a solid decade or more telling yourself that the only thing that you SHOULD WANT is to be an all-powerful career-focused conquistador, and everything else you might want is BAD and A SIGN OF WEAKNESS. If you want to feel good in your own skin, if you want to feel hopeful about your abilities and your day, if you want to believe that you are strong enough and smart enough and energetic enough to do anything you set your mind to, you have to give up your current religion and honor your heart and your body instead. You have to make some room for REALITY instead of expecting too much from yourself.
Instead of daydreaming about what it would feel like to quit, you have to sit down and ask yourself “What would it really mean to quit? How could that work?”.
The ones who are happiest are the ones who honor these feelings and take them seriously instead of telling an elaborate story about how these feelings mean that they suck.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Be Creative When You’re Feeling Stressed”

People are still expecting you to produce creative solutions despite your current mental state.
To start, you need to let go of trying to “Make yourself” come up with something creative.
This causes you to operate out of the primal, least creative part of your brain.
In particular, I find that I am most creative when I not only am giving myself space from my computer but also positioning myself in a “Happy place.” In the warmer months, that’s somewhere outside preferably along a lake.
Beautiful, peaceful surroundings lift my spirits and creative mental capacity.
Some of my coaching clients have found their happy, creative spaces in historic libraries, art museums, or even browsing through boutique shops.
Alternating between solo thinking and time in groups proves the most effective way to develop the most creative thoughts.
When your brain operates at full capacity, you may have the ability to come up with creative thoughts on the fly.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Productivity Tips for People Who Hate Productivity Tips”

Why do people who know a lot about what helps people focus still struggle to focus? Through my work, I’ve identified several reasons, as well as strategies that may help you gain control.
Trying to make it work can send you into a rut where you repeat unhelpful behaviors while beating yourself up over your lack of focus.
These are often the same clients who are closely attuned to the quality of their work experience, who find joy in flow and seek to create more of it, and for whom the introduction of industrial productivity levers feels stifling.
She’s much better served by an intention to “Work on project” or “Make progress on project,” particularly when she identifies discrete tasks and little milestones that can serve as indicators of progress.
Making progress on work that is meaningful is among the most energizing and satisfying experiences anyone can have.
University of Minnesota professor Theresa Glomb recommends organizing your work for a “Downhill start.” Like parking your car on a slope facing downhill, what can you do to set conditions such that you need only lift your foot from the brake to get moving? Clear off your desk before you start a new task? Write down your two top priorities for the next day before leaving in the evening? Perhaps you’re a big-picture person who gets bogged down in details.
Waiting for inspiration to create something big from scratch doesn’t work; in fact, it slams the brakes on productivity.
What does work is finding ways to take small steps and enjoying the resulting sense of progress.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to manage your biggest distractions when working from home”

The benefit for employers is that people who work from home tend to be more productive and happier, according to a new study by Porch, a website that matches homeowners with home service professionals.
According to Porch, the biggest distraction is the television; 76.1% of remote employees have worked with the TV on.
Here are a few ways to stay productive while working from home.
Flexible working arrangements can mean flexible hours, but if you’re not good about getting your work done and your performance is slacking, you’ll need to treat your home office like a regular office and set structured working hours, says Stack.
Create a contract with yourself, such as “Work begins at 8 a.m. and ends at 5 p.m., and I will take one hour for lunch,” she says.
Whether you work from home or in an office, the problem with distractions is that we’re conditioned to seek them out, says productivity expert Maura Thomas, author of Work Without Walls: An Executive’s Guide to Attention Management, Productivity, and the Future of Work.
“If other people are home when you’re working, make sure they know when you’re not to be disturbed,” she says.
Reclaim your ability to focus by closing out email and working in offline mode, suggests Thomas.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Should you delete your social media?”

Should you delete your social media accounts right now? The title of Jaron Lanier’s excellent recent polemic, Ten Arguments For Deleting Your Social Media Accounts Right Now, leaves no doubt which side he’s on.
The thorny issue here – when it comes to whether you, personally, should abandon social media – is that the latter viewpoint has plenty of truth to it, yet also serves as a convenient excuse.
While some people may genuinely face social isolation by deleting Facebook, or professional ruin by leaving LinkedIn, chances are you’re not among them – even if you feel pretty sure you are.
It’s more likely you’re telling yourself that story to spare yourself being deprived of social media’s comfortably sedative effects, and being left alone with your thoughts instead. Of course, that’s easy for me to say.
Sometimes the glib advice it’s easy for columnists to dispense is the right advice for you, even if you’d rather it weren’t.
Every individual-level “Happiness hack”, from digital detoxes to meditation to therapy, is open to the retort that what we really need is a fairer, more humane society – and self-help just serves to make us more accepting of the status quo.
The truth is, you could choose, right now, to jettison social media, or indeed many other unfulfilling aspects of your life.
Even telling yourself you don’t have a choice is a choice.

The orginal article.